List of Celtic deities

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The Celtic pantheon is known from a variety of sources such as written Celtic mythology, ancient places of worship, statues, engravings, religious objects, and place or personal names. The Celtic pantheon has over 1,200 named deities; a comprehensive list is difficult to assemble.

Celtic deities can belong to two categories: general deities and local deities. "General deities" were known by Celts throughout large regions, and are the gods and goddesses invoked for protection, healing, luck, and honour. The "local deities" that embodied Celtic nature worship were the spirits of a particular feature of the landscape, such as mountains, trees, or rivers, and thus were generally only known by the locals in the surrounding areas.[1]

After Celtic lands became Christianised, there were attempts by Christian writers to euhemerize or even demonize the pre-Christian deities. For example, the Tuatha Dé Danann of Irish mythological sources have commonly been interpreted to be a divine pantheon, despite certain redactors' interjecting that the Tuatha Dé Danann were merely mortals, or else that they were demons.[1]

Gaulish and Brythonic deities[edit]

The Gaulish Celts inhabited the region corresponding to modern-day France, Switzerland, southern and western Germany, Belgium, Frisia, Netherlands, Holland, Luxembourg and northern Italy. The Brythonic Celts, or Britons, inhabited most of the island of Great Britain and later migrated to Brittany.

Male[edit]

  • Abandinus - possibly a river god[2]
  • Abellio (Abelio, Abelionni) - god of apple trees[2]
  • Abianius - a river god[3]
  • Abilus - a god of health[3]
  • Abinius - a Gallic river god[3]
  • Adsmerius - a Gallic god identified with Mercury[3]
  • Aereda - a Gallic serpent god[4]
  • Aericurus - a god of the Underworld[3]
  • Alator - a war god[3]
  • Alaunus (Fin) - god of healing and prophecy[2]
  • Albiorix - a war god[3]
  • Albius - a healing god[3]
  • Alisanos (Alisaunus) - a mountain god[5]
  • Alletio (Allitio, Alittius) - a Brythonic warrior god and lord of the Underworld[3]
  • Allobrogis - Gallic god of the tribe Allobriges[3]
  • Alus - an agricultural god[6]
  • Ambisagrus, a god of thunder and lightning, Ancestor God, Sky God, God of Wind, Rain & Hail[7]
  • Andeis - a Gallic god of the Pyrenees[4]
  • Andescoci (Andescociocus) - a Brythonic god of messengers[3]
  • Andicrose - a Brythonic god of the woods[3]
  • Anextiomarus (Anextlomarus, Anextlomara) - a protector god[2]
  • Ankou - a god of death
  • Anoctitcus (Antenociticus, Antocidicus) - a warrior god or god of metalworking[3]
  • Anvallus - a Gallic father god[3]
  • Apollo Cunomaglus - a hunter god[8]
  • Apollo Grannus - a healing god[8]
  • Arardus - a Gallic god of the Pyrenees
  • Arciacon - Brythonic god of trade[3]
  • Arimanes - god of agriculture[3]
  • Ariocalatus (Riocalatus) - a warrior god[3]
  • Arixus - a Gallic god of the Pyrenees[4]
  • Armogius (Harmogius, Marinogius, Marmogius, Maromogius) - a powerful warrior god[3]
  • Arpeninus - a Gallic god of the Pyrenees[4]
  • Artahe (Artehe) - a Gallic protector god associated with bears[3]
  • Arvalus - a Brythonic god, possibly of agriculture[3]
  • Arvernus - a tribal god[2]
  • Arausio - a god of water[2]
  • Atepomarus - a Gallic horse god[3]
  • Atesmerius - a Gallic healer god[3]
  • Auseci - a Brythonic nature god[3]
  • Avicantus - a river god of Nîmes, now in France[3]
  • Barinthus (Manannán mac Lir) - a god of the sea and water[9]
  • Baesert - a Gallic god of the Pyrenees
  • Baigorixus - a vernal god of the Pyrenees
  • Balitucaurus - Brythonic god whose name means "lover of the death"[3]
  • Barrecis (Barrex) - Gallic war god[3]
  • Bedaius - a sea god[10]
  • Beissirissa - Gallic god of lawmaking[3]
  • Belado - Gallic warrior god[3]
  • Belatucadros - a god of war[7]
  • Belenus - a god of healing.
  • Bemilucius - a Gallic god of Paris whose statue was found in Burgundy
  • Bergimus - god of heights and mountains[11]
  • Bolgios (Belgius) - a god of lightning
  • Bolvinnus - protector god of wells[3]
  • Borvo (Bormo, Bormanus), a god of mineral and hot springs[9]
  • Borrum - a god of the winds.
  • Bracacia (Brâg) - Brythonic god of brewing and warrior god[3]
  • Brasennus - a god for whom an inscription in the house of vilicus of Trumplini is dedicated[6]
  • Bregans (Bregantis) - a god of the tribe Brigantes, consort of Brigantia[3]
  • Brenos - a war god[5]
  • Britovius (Britus) - a god who selects who will live on the battlefield[3]
  • Brixantus (Brixianus, Brixienus) - a Gallic god whose name means "god of the higher place"[3]
  • Budenicus - a war god whose name means "he who will prevail"[3]
  • Bugius - Gallic god of the healing waters[3]
  • Buxenus - a god of box trees[2]
  • Caber - god of speed and bards[3]
  • Cacus - fire god[3]
  • Caiva (Casis, Cassibus, Cassis) - Gallic protector god of tribes, not to be confused with Caiva, a mother goddess[3]
  • Caletos - a god of the hard[12]
  • Callirius - wood and hunter god[3]
  • Camoulatis (Kamoulatis) - a warrior god[3]
  • Camulus (Camulus, Camalos) - a god of war and sky[9]
  • Canetonnessis[2]
  • Carpantus (Carpentus)[3]
  • Caswallawn - war god[13]
  • Caturix - Gallic warrior god[3]
  • Ceaiius - a Brythonic god, possibly of oceans
  • Ceileus (Celeus) - a god, possibly of the druid order[3]
  • Cernunnos - horned God or God of fertility, life, animals, wealth and the underworld.[9]
  • Cicolluis - a god of the Celtic army[2]
  • Cimialcinnus - god of paths
  • Cissonius - a god of trade[14]
  • Mars Cnabetius - a god of war[15]
  • Cocidius - a god of war[9]
  • Condatis - a god of the confluences of rivers[7]
  • Contrebis (Contrebis, Contrebus) - a god of a city[2]
  • Mars Corotiacus - a death god
  • Cranus - god of forests[3]
  • Creto (Greto) - Gallic god at Stumpfer Turm, now in Germany[3]
  • Cuntinus - Gallic god whose name means "dog of the city"[3]
  • Cuslanus - a god associated with Jupiter[6]
  • Deus Latis - a Brythonic god whose role is unknown
  • Dervos (Robor, Roboris, Robur) - god of the oaks[3]
  • Deuce (Dus) - Brythonic chief god of the Brigantes[3]
  • Deus Ducavavius - god of the rivers[11]
  • Deus Orevaius - a little known god to whom an inscription at Cemenelum was dedicated[11]
  • Dii Casses - god of refuse[2]
  • Dinomogetimarus - a powerful protector god
  • Dis Pater (Dispater), a god of the underworld[2]
  • Divano - a war god[16]
  • Donnotaurus - a Gallic bull god[3]
  • Dorminus - a god of hot springs[11]
  • Dullovius - a forest god
  • Dumiatis - a Gallic god of Puy de Dome that became associated with Mercury
  • Dunatis - god of fortifications[5]
  • Endovius - a god whose name means "the one who provides heat"
  • Entarabus (Intarabus, Interabus) - a god whose name means "between the rivers"[3]
  • Epos Olloatir - a god of horses, possibly the consort of Epona[9]
  • Erditse - minor deity known by only one inscription[17]
  • Esus (Hesus)(possibly) the God of vegatation[9]
  • Etnosus - a bird god[3]
  • Fagus, a god of beech trees[2]
  • Gabrus (Gebrus, Gebrinnius, Gebrinus) - healer and fertility god[3]
  • Gavida - god of the forge[3]
  • Genii Cucullait (Genii Cucullatus) - hooded deities associated with fertility and prosperity[3]
  • Gesacus - a Gallic god whose name means "secret world"[3]
  • Giarinus - a Gallic god of rivers[3]
  • Gisacus - a warrior god[3]
  • Glanis - a spring god[3]
  • Gnatus - a Gallic god whose name means "he who knows"[3]
  • Gobannus (Gobannos, Cobannus) - a smith god
  • Grannus - a god of healing and mineral springs[2]
  • Graselos - patron god of the healing spring[3]
  • Greidiawl - a god of conquest
  • Gwendolleu - a god of strategy
  • Herne - god of wisdom
  • Hillon - god of music
  • Hu - a god associated with the sun[3]
  • Ialonus - a god of meadows[5]
  • Icaunus (Icauna, Icauni) - a god of a river[2]
  • Ihamnagalla Sqnnagalla - a god for whom an inscription was dedicated by Gaius Octavian Capiton[11]
  • Ilixo - god of hot springs[3]
  • Ilunis (Ilunnus) - a warrior god and possibly a god of eloquence[3]
  • Iovantucarus - a protector of youth[2]
  • Joehaynus - a god of knives[2]
  • Jupiter Felvennis - a god of the sky[11]
  • Kagiris - agrarian god[3]
  • Karnuntinus - a god who gave his name to Carnuntum, now in Germany[3]
  • Kelpie (Kelpy) - A water sprite god[18]
  • Kenninos (Penninos) - God of the summit[10]
  • Lacavus - Gallic warrior god[3]
  • Lanovalus - a Gallic leader god[3]
  • Larraso - possibly a Gallic blacksmith god[3]
  • Lavaratus - god whose name means "he who is sufficient"[3]
  • Lavictus - Gallic healer god
  • Leigh Gurney - Gallic darkness god
  • Leherennus - warrior god[3]
  • Lelhunnus - god of light[3]
  • Leno - patron god of Lérins[19]
  • Lenumius (Lenumio) - healer god[3]
  • Lenus (Laenus) - a healing god[2]
  • Letinno - Gallic god whose name means "the housing"[3]
  • Leucetios (Leucetius) - a god of thunder[9]
  • Leucutios - a healer god
  • Leusdrinus - a Gallic god who resolves arguments[3]
  • Limetus - a Gallic nature god whose name means "he is of the elm"[3]
  • Litavis - a Brythonic god of the forge, not to be confused with the goddess, Litavis[3]
  • Livicus - little known Gallic god in Germany[3]
  • Lugus (Arverniorix, Clavarigiatis, Dumiatis, Vassocaletis) - god of creation and learning[20]
  • Luxovius (Lussoius) - a god of a city's water[2]
  • MacKay - Scottish god, possibly of fire[3]
  • Magalos - Gallic hunter god[3]
  • Magesus (Magisus) - a god of great strength[3]
  • Magiorix - Gallic god whose name means "the great king"[3]
  • Magniacus - possibly a Gallic war god[3]
  • Mantounus - a Gallic god whose name means "powerful jaws"[3]
  • Maponos (Maponus) - a god of youth[7]
  • Matuix - god of the sign[3]
  • Matunus - a bear god[3]
  • Matutinus - patron of the herons[3]
  • Medignus (Medugenus) - a god whose name means "drink maker"[3]
  • Medocius - a fight god[3]
  • Medros - a little known god who leaned on a bull[3]
  • Meduio - god of drunkenness[3]
  • Medurinis - god of drunkenness[3]
  • Meldius (Mellt) - a Gallic lightning god[3]
  • Melovius - god of the struggle[3]
  • Melwas - god of the Otherworld[9]
  • Minuris - a Gallic god of binding and spells[3]
  • Moccus - god of pigs[9]
  • Mogetius - a Gallic warrior god[3]
  • Mogons (Moguns, Mogounos) - a god of righteousness[2]
  • Moltinus - a ram god[3]
  • Moritasgus - a healing badger god[3]
  • Mullo - the god of mules and horses[9]
  • Nabelcus - a Gallic god associated with mountains[3]
  • Nemausus - a god worshipped at Nîmes[3]
  • Nemedus - a god possibly associated with sanctuaries
  • Nerius - god of the springs[2]
  • Niskus - a sea god[3]
  • Nodens (Nudens, Nodons) - a god of healing, the sea, hunting and dogs
  • Ocaere (Ocelos, Ocelus) - god of agriculture[3]
  • Ogmios - god of eloquence[2]
  • Ollodagus (Ollodius, Olloudius) - probably a protector god[3]
  • Ollovidius - an all knowing god[12]
  • Padus (Pados) - river god[3]
  • Paronnus - a god for whom a votive offering at Brixia was dedicated[11]
  • Parthinus - Gallic god, probably of the Partheni[3]
  • Pipius - Gallic god whose name means "he is as the domestic birds"[3]
  • Pisintos - a Gallic god equated with Vertumnus, god of the seasons[3]
  • Poeninus (Poininus, Pyninus) - thunder god[3]
  • Ratamatos - a defense god[3]
  • Riga - warrior god[3]
  • Rigisamus - a Brythonic and Gallic war god[3]
  • Rigonometis - a war god[3]
  • Robor - a god of oak trees[2]
  • Roquetius - possibly a Gallic hunter god[3]
  • Rudianos - a god of war[2]
  • Rudiobus (Rudobius) - war god[3]
  • Sacanus - god whose name means "the strong" or "the ugly"[3]
  • Saegon - a Brythonic war god[3]
  • Saegontius - a Brythonic god of victory[3]
  • Segomo - a god of war[9]
  • Sexarborius (Suexoprennos) - god of trees[3]
  • Siannus - healer god[3]
  • Sinquas (Sinquates, Sinquatis, Sinquatos) - hunter god[3]
  • Smertrios (Smertios, Smertrius) - a god of war[7]
  • Smertullus - a hammer god[3]
  • Solitumarus - a healer god[3]
  • Subremis - a Gallic warrior god[3]
  • Sucellus (Sucellos) - a god of nature[9]
  • Surburus - Gallic god whose name means "the shining thrower"[3]
  • Sutugius - Gallic defensive god[3]
  • Tanarus - a river god[3]
  • Taranis (Taranus) - a god of thunder[7]
  • Tarvis Trigaraunos - a bull god[7]
  • Telo - patron god of Toulouse, now in France[3]
  • Theutates (Teutates) - a god of the people
  • Thincsus - a warrior god[3]
  • Tiernon (Tigernonos) - a Gallic shepherd god with supernatural powers[3]
  • Tinco (Tincus) - Gallic god, probably of the Underworld[3]
  • Toleandossus - god of eloquence[3]
  • Toutatis (Caturix, Teutates) - a tribal protector god[2]
  • Tribanos (Tribans, Tribantis, Tribantos) - warrior god[3]
  • Tridamos - bovine triplication and abundance[3]
  • Ucuetis - blacksmith god[3]
  • Urien (Uryen) - sun god[3]
  • Urobrocis - an agrarian god[3]
  • Uxellus - god whose name means "he of the high market"[3]
  • Vasio - possibly patron god of Vaison-la-Romaine
  • Vellaunus (Veraudunus) - possibly an ancestral god of death and the Underworld[3]
  • Veraudinus - a sun god[3]
  • Vercanua (Vindonnus) - healer god[3]
  • Vernostonus - a Brythonic god, possibly a warrior or funerary god[3]
  • Vesontius - a war god
  • Veteris (Vitiris, Vheteris, Huetiris, Hueteris, Hveteris) - possibly a hunting god[2]
  • Vicribus - a war god[3]
  • Viducus - a god of wood
  • Vindonnus - sun god[3]
  • Vinotonus - Brythonic god of vines[3]
  • Vintius - god of winds[3]
  • Viridios (Viridius) - possibly a god of plants[3]
  • Virotutis - Gallic healer god[3]
  • Visucius - possibly a Gallic god of trade[3]
  • Vitucadrus - a god brilliant in energy[12]
  • Vorocius - healer god[3]
  • Vosegus - a god of the Vosges Mountains[3]
  • Wayland (Volund, Weland, Weiland, Weyland) - a smith god[7]
  • Zacharus - a god of theft[2]

Female[edit]

  • Acionna - a river goddess[21][22]
  • Adder - an evil snake goddess[18]
  • Adganai - mother goddesses[23]
  • Adonna - a goddess of Orleans, now in France
  • Adsagsona - a sorceress goddess of the Underworld[3]
  • Adsullata - goddess of the River Savubalabada[5][24]
  • Aericula - a mother goddess[25]
  • Aericura - Underworld goddess[26]
  • Aeron - goddess of war and slaughter[18][24]
  • Aide - goddess of magic[27]
  • Aige - water goddess[27]
  • Ailbe - goddess of wisdom[27]
  • Ailinn - tree goddess of love and magic[27]
  • Alagabiae - giving mother goddesses[3]
  • Alantedoba - an agricultural goddess[6]
  • Alaterviae - mother goddesses[28]
  • Alauda (Alauna) - a bountiful goddess[3]
  • Alavina - a mother goddess[3]
  • Ambirena - mother goddesses[3]
  • Ambiamarcis - Gallic mother goddesses[3]
  • Ammaca - a grandmother goddess[28]
  • Ancamna - a water goddess[3]
  • Ancasta - goddess of the River Itchen
  • Andante - a Gallic fertility goddess[3]
  • Andarta - a goddess of war[9]
  • Andraste - goddess of victory[9]
  • Anesiaminehae - mother goddess[28]
  • Annea Clivana - a protective goddess associated with spirits
  • Apadeva - water goddess[3]
  • Arduinna - goddess of the Ardennes Forest[7][29]
  • Arenmetia - a healing goddess[29]
  • Argante - a healing goddess
  • Arnomecta - a Brythonic blacksmith goddess[3]
  • Arterancus - goddess of harvest[3]
  • Arnemetia (Arnamentia) - a water goddess[29]
  • Arricura (Herecura) - a funerary goddess[3]
  • Artio - goddess of the bear[9][29]
  • Atesmerta - a goddess of abundance[3]
  • Audrinehae (Austriahenis, Autrinehabae) - mother goddesses of destiny[3]
  • Aufaniae - mother goddesses[2]
  • Aventia - a goddess who gave her name to the town Avanche, now in Switzerland[2]
  • Aventla - a Gallic goddess worshipped at Aventicum
  • Aveta - a mother goddess, associated with the fresh-water spring at Trier, in what is now Germany[9]
  • Axona - goddess of the river Aisne[30]
  • Baeserta - a goddess of the Pyrenees[4]
  • Beda - one of a pair of Alaisiagae, a burial goddess[3]
  • Belisama - a goddess of lakes and rivers, fire, crafts and light, consort of the god Belenus[9]
  • Bellona - a Scottish war goddess[9]
  • Berecynthia (Berecyntia) - earth goddess[5]
  • Bergusia - goddess of the crafts[3]
  • Bibracte - a fortification goddess, see etymology of Bibracte, a Gaulish fortified city
  • Blotugus - goddess of fertility[3]
  • Bodua - a goddess of war[5]
  • Bormana - goddess of minerals and spring water
  • Boudena (Boudina) - warrior goddess[3]
  • Boudiga - a goddess of war
  • Boudihillia - one of a pair of Alaisiagae, a goddess of victory[3]
  • Brianan - a Scottish deity used for making oaths[3]
  • Briant - a Brythonic tutelary deity of a river of the same name[5]
  • Bricta (Brixta) - a Gallic water goddess, consort of Luxovius[3]
  • Bride - Scottish goddess of blacksmithing, healing, and poetry[3]
  • Brigandu (Brigindo) - goddess of arts, crafts, and fertility[26]
  • Brigantia - goddess of victory, equated with Victoria[9]
  • Brigida - patron of medicine[31]
  • Britannia (Prydein), originally a personification of the island, later made into a goddess[9]
  • Brixia - a river goddess[21]
  • Cadwallon (Cassivelaunus, Caswallawn, Caswallon, Catwallawn) - goddess of the craft[3]
  • Cailleach Bheur - a Scottish goddess associated with winter
  • Caimineae - mother goddesses[28]
  • Caiva - a mother goddess[3]
  • Camma - goddess of the hunt[2]
  • Campestres - a triad of goddesses of fertility and abundance[2]
  • Candida - goddess of luck[3]
  • Cantismerta - a Gallic goddess whose name means "providing together"
  • Cantrusteihiae - ancestral mother goddesses[28]
  • Carantana - a goddess of wisdom[3]
  • Carlin - spirit of the eve of Halloween[26]
  • Carpundia - a river goddess[21]
  • Cassibodua - goddess of flight[3]
  • Cathubodua - a goddess of war[9]
  • Caticatona - a water goddess[32]
  • Cissonia - a Gallic goddess of trade[3]
  • Clota - patron goddess of the River Clyde[9]
  • Clutoida - a river goddess[21]
  • Coinchend - a female warrior from the Otherworld[5]
  • Conchenn - goddess of love
  • Corra - a Scottish goddess of prophecy[9]
  • Coventina - goddess of wells and springs[5]
  • Cuda - fertility goddess[3]
  • Cuhvetana - goddess of fertility and healing[33]
  • Damara - a fertility goddess[9]
  • Dahud-Ahes - a goddess of earthly pleasure[9]
  • Damona - consort of Apollo Borvo and of Apollo Moritasgus, a goddess of healing, fertility, and incubation
  • Dea Latis - a goddess of bogs and pools[19]
  • Dea Abnoba - patron goddess of the Black Forest[21][34]
  • Dea Matres - a triad of mother goddesses[9]
  • Dea Matrona - "divine mother goddess" and goddess of the River Marne in Gaul
  • Dea Mediotautehae - mother goddesses[28]
  • Dea Meduna - goddess of healing[28]
  • Dea Sequana - goddess of the River Seine
  • Deae Nutrices - mother goddesses
  • Deae Vediantiae - mother goddesses[35]
  • Dealgnait - a death goddess
  • Debranua - a goddess of air[2]
  • Dervonnae - mother goddesses[36]
  • Deva (Dee) - goddess of the river Dee[37]
  • Dexiva - a Gallic goddess of the tribe Dexviates
  • Dexsiua - a Gallic goddess of the southern winds[3]
  • Dia Greine - a Scottish sun goddess[9]
  • Dibǒnā - a fountain goddess[38]
  • Divona (Devona) - a Gallic goddess of a sacred spring used by the city of Burdigala as a water source[9]
  • Dominae - mother goddesses[11]
  • Druantia - a hypothetical Gallic tree goddess proposed by Robert Graves in his 1948 study The White Goddess; popular with Neopagans.[7]
  • Dunisia - a goddess of a hill or fort
  • Edain - a goddess associated with horseback riding[13]
  • Elen (Helen, Helena) - a Brythonic goddess associated with Colchester[3]
  • Elphane (Elphlane) - goddess of disease[3]
  • Epona - fertility goddess, protector of horses, donkeys, and mules[9]
  • Erecura (Aeracura) - earth goddess[21]
  • Etiona - goddess of knowledge[3]
  • Fachea - goddess of poetry[3]
  • Feminae - mother goddesses[11]
  • Fideal - a water demon goddess[26]
  • Gabiabus (Gabiae, Gabinis, Gcabiadus, Iunoniibus Gabiabus, Matronis Gabiabus) - mother goddesses and protectors of women[3]
  • Garbh Ogh - a Gallic goddess of hunting, possibly different from the Irish Garbh Ogh[3]
  • Garmangabis - goddess of fortune[3]
  • Geofon - goddess of the ocean[3]
  • Glanicae (Gontia, Griselicae) - a triad of mother goddesses associated with healing springs[39]
  • Gobróig - goddesses of wells and springs[40]
  • Gwenn Teir Bronn - goddess of motherhood[3]
  • Habetrot - a Brythonic goddess of spinning and healing, later euhemerized[9]
  • Harimella (Viradechthis) - a Scottish goddess of protection[9]
  • Hella - goddess of the underworld[3]
  • Henwen - a sow goddess[9]
  • Herecura - a goddess of death and fertility[39]
  • Hidua - goddess of birth[3]
  • Histria - a Gallic goddess of land[11]
  • Ialona (Ianuaria, Icotiae, Icovellauna, Iethon, Inciona) - goddess of cultivated fields[3]
  • Ianuaraia (Januaria) - Gallic goddess of the New Year[3]
  • Icaunus (Icauna) - a goddess of a river
  • Icovellauna - a water goddess[3]
  • Imona - a well goddess[41]
  • Inciona - goddess of metalworking[3]
  • Iouga - goddess of joinings[42]
  • Isosa - a Gallic goddess of respect[3]
  • Iunones - triple mother goddesses[3]
  • Junones - a triad of goddesses of fertility, health, and regeneration[39]
  • Karnuntina - a Gallic goddess who gives her name to Carnuntum, now in Germany[3]
  • Ked (Ket) - an evil mother goddess[18]
  • Kesara - mother goddess[43]
  • Korrigan, The - a Gallic goddess of underground springs and wells
  • Kosmerta - a Gallic goddess later associated with Mercury, with a role similar to him[44]
  • Laha - a Gallic goddess of the Pyrenees of healing[3]
  • Lamiae Tres - a triad of witches[3]
  • Lerina - a patron goddess of Lérins
  • Letha - a Midsummer harvest goddess
  • Litavis - an earth goddess[5]
  • Maiabus - a Gallic goddess with a role similar to Maia[45]
  • Mairiae - a triad of goddesses, inseparable[2]
  • Maluisae - mother goddesses[3]
  • Marcia Proba - a Brythonic warrior queen who enforced the Marcian Statutes, deified[9]
  • Maree - goddess of wells, stands of trees[3]
  • Matres Almahabae - a triad of mother goddesses[39]
  • Matres Britannae - a triad of mother goddesses[22]
  • Matres Comedovae - a triad of mother goddesses[3]
  • Matres Domesticae - a triad of mother goddesses[3]
  • Matres Eburnicae - a triad of mother goddesses[22]
  • Matres Gerudatiae - a triad of mother goddesses[39]
  • Matres Glanicae (Matrebo Glaneikabo) - a triad of mother goddesses[3]
  • Matres Griselicae - a triad of mother goddesses[3]
  • Matres Mogontiones - a triad of mother goddesses[22]
  • Matres Nemetiales - a triad of mother goddesses[22]
  • Matres Ollototae - a triad of mother goddesses[22]
  • Matres Suleviae - a triad of mother goddesses[39]
  • Matres Ubelkabae (Matres Ubelkae) - a triad of mother goddesses[3]
  • Matris Augustis - mother goddesses[22]
  • Matronae Aufaniea - mother goddesses[28]
  • Matronae Alhiahenae - mother goddesses[3]
  • Matronae Andrustehiae - mother goddesses[3]
  • Matronae Audrinehae - mother goddesses[39]
  • Matronae Axsinginehae - mother goddesses[3]
  • Matronae Dervonnae - mother goddesses[35]
  • Matronae Fernovinehae - mother goddesses[3]
  • Matronae Ollogabiae - mother goddesses[28]
  • Matronae Senonae - mother goddesses[22]
  • Matronae Suleviae - mother goddesses[28]
  • Matronae Udravarinehae - mother goddesses[3]
  • Matronae Vacallinehae - mother goddesses[39]
  • Matronae Vallabneihae - mother goddesses[3]
  • Matronae Vediantiae - mother goddesses[35]
  • Mattiaca - patron goddess of the sacred waters[3]
  • Maximia - fountain goddess[46]
  • Meduna - goddess of mead[3]
  • Melior - a Brythonic goddess of fortune, later conflated with Fortuna
  • Melior - a sister of Melusine[3]
  • Melusine - a Brythonic snake goddess[9]
  • Menmandutae - mother goddesses[39]
  • Mm - goddess of the thought[3]
  • Mogontia - a goddess of youth[3]
  • Momu - Scottish goddess of land[5]
  • Morgay - a Brythonic harvest goddess[9]
  • Nantosuelta - goddess of nature, the earth, fire, and fertility in Gaul[9]
  • Nantosuetta - a fertility goddess[26]
  • Naria - a Gallic goddess, possibly of luck and blessings[3]
  • Nassania - a river goddess[3]
  • Natae - goddesses whose roles are unknown[11]
  • Nemausicae - mother goddesses[3]
  • Nemetiales (Nemetialis) - mother goddesses[3]
  • Nemetona - a goddess of sacred groves[9]
  • Nicevenn - a Scottish crone witch goddess[9]
  • Niskai - water sprites[36]
  • Noreia - goddess of childbirth[3]
  • Nostiluca - a goddess of magic
  • Nousantia - a Gallic goddess, her name means "she is the new (secret) opinion"[3]
  • Nutrix - a mother goddess of renewal and rebirth[3]
  • Oanuava (Obelenses Matres) - a Gallic earth goddess[9]
  • Obelenses Matres (Olatonae, Onuava) - a triad of mother goddesses[39]
  • Octocannabus (Octocannae, Octocannis) - mother goddesses[3]
  • Ollogabiae - mother goddesses[3]
  • Ollototis - mother goddesses[3]
  • Olwyn - a fertility goddess
  • Oulatias (Ulatias) - a Gallic sovereignty goddess[3]
  • Palatina - a mother goddess
  • Palatina - a sister of Melusine[3]
  • Palu - mother goddess[3]
  • Perta (Proxumae) - goddess of the sacred forest
  • Proxumae - guardian goddesses
  • Quadriviae (Quadrivae, Quadruviae) - goddesses of the crossroads[3]
  • Ratis - a Brythonic goddess of fortresses[9]
  • Regina - a Brythonic goddess of queens or a queen goddess[3]
  • Ricagambeda - war goddess[3]
  • Rigani - a little known Brythonic queen goddess who was offered a wild boar
  • Ritona (Pritona) - goddess of fords[3]
  • Rocloisiabo - mother goddesses[22]
  • Ronea - a Gallic goddess, possibly of horses[3]
  • Rosmerta - goddess of fertility and abundance[7]
  • Rotona - a goddess of nature
  • Rumanehae (Rumanehis) - mother goddesses[3]
  • Saba - mother and fertility goddess[47]
  • Sabrina (Habrena, Hafren, Sabrann) - goddess of the River Severn[3]
  • Sadv - an ancient deer goddess
  • Saitada - a Brythonic goddess of the throng[5]
  • Samara - Gallic river goddess[3]
  • Segeta - goddess of thermal springs[3]
  • Segomana - a mother goddess of victory[3]
  • Seixomniai Leuciticai - a Celtic goddess, equated with Diana[11]
  • Senua (Senuna) - a Brythonic older spring goddess[2]
  • Sequana - goddess of the River Seine
  • Setlocenia - a Brythonic goddess of long life[3]
  • Silgina - goddess of springs[3]
  • Sirona - goddess of healing and fertility[9]
  • Soio - a river goddess who gave her name to Soynos, now in France[3]
  • Soucana - patron goddess of the river Sâone[9]
  • Stanna - goddess whose name means "the permanent goddess"[3]
  • Stine Bheag O'Tarbat - a mother goddess
  • Sueta - a goddess of hot springs[11]
  • Sul - goddess of the hot springs in Bath[13]
  • Suleviae - a triune version of Sulis
  • Sulis - a solar nourishing, life-giving goddess and an agent of curses[9]
  • Tamara - a Brythonic goddess, patron of the river Tamar[9]
  • Tamesis - goddess of the River Thames[5]
  • Taranis - a death goddess, not to be confused with the god Taranis[9]
  • Tawa - a river goddess[48]
  • Temusio - goddess of thermal baths[3]
  • Thucoliss - a little known Gallic goddess worshipped by priestesses[3]
  • Triana - a goddess of healing, knowledge, and nature
  • Tribans (Tricoria) - patron goddess of the Tricorii tribe[3]
  • Triduana - a beautiful Scottish goddess of Edinburgh[9]
  • Tritta (Trittia) - patron goddess of Trets, now in France[3]
  • Ura (Urae fontis) - goddess of springs[3]
  • Urnia (Ussia) - warrior goddess
  • Uroica - goddess of heather[7]
  • Ursula of the Silver Host - a swan maiden
  • Vatviae - mother goddesses[3]
  • Veica Noriceia - a war goddess[11]
  • Vennolandua - mother of Sabrina
  • Verauduna - a goddess of the Underworld[3]
  • Verbeia - goddess of the River Wharfe[5]
  • Vercana (Veica, Visucia) - a Gallic muse goddess[3]
  • Vesunna - a goddess who gave her name to the town Vesona, now in France[21]
  • Vibes - a goddess attested in Noricum[10]
  • Viradecdis (Viradecthis, Viratethis, Virodacti, Viroththis) - a goddess, protector of boatmen[3]
  • Visucia - consort of Visucius
  • Wachilt - a goddess of the sea[7]
  • Warna - a Brythonic goddess of healing charms and shipwrecks
  • White Lady, The - dryad goddess of death and destruction[49]
  • Xulsigiae - triad of fertility goddesses[3]
  • Yonne - a river goddess[50]

Welsh deities/characters[edit]

The Welsh are the Britons that inhabit modern-day Wales (Welsh: Cymru). After the Anglo-Saxons invaded Britain, many Brythonic territories came under Anglo-Saxon influence; in Wales, however, Brythonic Celtic religion was largely retained. Many Welsh myths were later Christianized so it is sometimes difficult to determine if their characters were originally gods, mortals, or historical figures.

Male[edit]

Female[edit]

Gaelic deities[edit]

Note: Modern spellings are shown in brackets.

Male[edit]

Female[edit]

Celtiberian, Gallaecian and Lusitanian deities[edit]

The Celtiberians were the ancient peoples who inhabited modern-day Portugal and Spain. Some believe the Lusitani and Vettones were culturally Celtic. Nevertheless, they were at least Celtic-influenced.

Male[edit]

Female[edit]

  • Arentia (Arengia)[3]
  • Ariconā - goddess of tribal protection and dogs
  • Asidiae[84]
  • Ataegina (Ataecina)[83]
  • Banda (Bandis) - goddess of the entrance to the Otherworld, water protection
  • Bandoga (Bandonga)
  • Besenclā (Besenclae) - a community and house protector[84]
  • Broeneiae[84]
  • Coruae[84]
  • Corvā - war and defense goddess
  • Cosuneae[84]
  • Crougeae (Corougiae)
  • Deae sanctae (Burrulobrigensi)[84]
  • Deiba[96]
  • Dēvā
  • Dēvās Nemucelaecās - celestial goddesses
  • Endovellius - water deity[98]
  • Epane (Epona, Iccona)
  • Erbina - a goddess of wild animals, hunting, and domestic security[83]
  • Ermae[84]
  • Flauiae Conimbriga (Flauiae Conimbrigae)[84]
  • Frovida
  • Icconā - healing and medicine goddess
  • Ilurbeda[99]
  • Lacipaea (Lacibiā, Lacibea)[83]
  • Lahara[3]
  • Lahus Paraliomegus[3]
  • Laneana (Laneanis) - a goddess of springs and floods[83]
  • Lidā - land and fertility goddess
  • Limia - goddess of the Lima river
  • Losa[100]
  • Luna Augusta[101]
  • Matres Termegiste - a triad of mother goddesses
  • Mirobleo[89]
  • Munidis[83]
  • Nabia (Navia) - versatile goddess[83]
  • Nymphis[89]
  • Ocaeris
  • Ocrimirae[89]
  • Rea[82]
  • Reva (Reua) - personification of water flows[102]
  • Sūliās - goddesses associated with medicine and springs
  • Thucolis[103]
  • Toga[83]
  • Trebaruna[83]
  • Trebopala[86]
  • Turculā - a boar goddess
  • Tutelae[89]
  • Visucia[3]

Germanian and Pannonian Celtic deities[edit]

Germania was a geographical region covering north-central Europe. Pannonia was a region in central Europe.

Male[edit]

Female[edit]

  • Apadeva - a water goddess[14]
  • Cissonia - a goddess of trade[14]
  • Danuvia - river goddess[3]
  • Matres Mopates - a triad of mother goddesses[22]
  • Matres Treverae - a triad of mother goddesses[22]
  • Nehalennia - a goddess of seafarers and abundance[9]
  • Salacea - water goddess[3]
  • Sandravdiga[3]
  • Sarana - a healer goddess[3]
  • Uncia[3]
  • Vataranehae (Veterahenae) - mother goddesses[3]
  • Vesuniahenia - mother goddess[3]
  • Vesunna[3]

Illyrian and Moesian Celtic deities[edit]

Illyria is a region in the western part of the Balkan peninsula.

Male[edit]

Female[edit]

  • Eia - a healing goddess, later assimilated to Bona Dea[11]
  • Magla - hunting goddess[3]
  • Matres-Nutrices - mother goddesses[22]
  • Orcia - river goddess[3]
  • Sentona[3]
  • Tiana[3]
  • Trita - goddess of health[105]
  • Venus Ansotica

Pictish deities[edit]

The Picts were ancient peoples living in Scotland.

Female[edit]

  • Athfhinn[106]
  • Berva - river goddess[48]
  • Boderia - river goddess[48]
  • Brutaca - river goddess[48]
  • Buadhnat - river goddess[48]
  • Cuachag[106]
  • Deva[106]
  • Dubrona - river goddess[48]
  • Duibhe[106]
  • Éiteag - a sprite[106]
  • Gamhnach[106]
  • Gelidia - river goddess[48]
  • Labara - river goddess[48]
  • Luathnat - river goddess[48]
  • Nectona - river goddess[48]
  • Tava (Tatha) - river goddess[106]

Galatian deities[edit]

The Galatians were the ancient peoples who inhabited north-central Anatolia (modern-day Turkey).

Male[edit]

  • Bussumuras (Bussumarius, Bussurigius) - a god of thunder[7]
  • Deiotaurus - a bull god[3]
  • Souolibrogenos[107]
  • Tabalenos (Taballaenus) - a hunter god[3]
  • Taenos - a lightning god[3]
  • Tarvianos - a sky god[3]
  • Telesphorus[108]
  • Zeus Bousorigios[107]
  • Zeus Tavianos[109]

Female[edit]

  • Diana - A boar riding goddess called a demon by the Romans, not to be confused with the Roman Diana[110]

References[edit]

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