List of Dominican submissions for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film

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The Dominican Republic is among the one-hundred countries that have submitted films for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The award is handed out annually by the United States Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to a feature-length motion picture produced outside the United States that contains primarily non-English dialogue.[1]

The Dominican Republic has submitted a total of ten films since their debut in 1983, but they have never yet been nominated.

Submissions[edit]

Every year, each country is invited by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to submit its best film for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The Foreign Language Film Award Committee oversees the process and reviews all the submitted films. Following this, they vote via secret ballot to determine the five nominees for the award.[1]

The following is a list of the films submitted by the Dominican Republic in the Best Foreign Language Film category at the Academy Awards. All films were produced in Spanish.

Year
(Ceremony)
English title Spanish title Director Result
1983
(56th)
Guaguasi Guaguasi Jorge Ulla Not Nominated
1988
(61st)
One Way Ticket Un pasaje de Ida Agliberto Meléndez Not Nominated
1995
(68th)
Nueba Yol Nueba Yol Ángel Muñiz Not Nominated
2011
(84th)
Love Child[2] La hija natural Leticia Tonos Not Nominated
2012
(85th)
Jaque Mate[3] Jaque Mate José María Cabral Not Nominated
2013
(86th)
Who's the Boss?[4] ¿Quién Manda? Ronni Castillo Not Nominated
2014
(87th)
Cristo Rey[5] Cristo Rey Leticia Tonos Not Nominated
2015
(88th)
Sand Dollars[6] Dólares de Arena Laura Amelia Guzmán, Israel Cárdenas Not Nominated
2016
(89th)
Sugar Fields[7] Flor de Azúcar Fernando Baez Mella Not Nominated
2017
(90th)
Woodpeckers[8] Carpinteros José María Cabral Not Nominated

Notes[edit]

The Dominican Republic's first submission, Guaguasi, was not a majority Dominican production. Set amidst the 1956 Cuban Revolution, it was filmed in the Dominican Republic by a Cuban-American exile.

References[edit]

Variety[9]

  1. ^ a b "Rule Thirteen: Special Rules for the Foreign Language Film Award" (PDF). Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 August 2014. Retrieved 19 September 2014. 
  2. ^ "63 Countries Vie for 2011 Foreign Language Film Oscar". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 21 May 2012. Retrieved 2011-10-14. 
  3. ^ "Jaque Mate, nominada por RD a los Oscar". El Nacional. 18 September 2012. Archived from the original on 6 January 2013. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  4. ^ "Dominican film vying for Oscar: Who's The Boss?". Dominican Today. Retrieved 2013-08-31. 
  5. ^ "87th Academy Awards Foreign Language Film Submissions". Move On. Retrieved 11 August 2014. 
  6. ^ "Dominican Republic Selects 'Sand Dollars' as Best Foreign Language Oscar Entry". Variety Latino. 4 September 2015. Retrieved 4 September 2015. 
  7. ^ Salazar, Francisco (9 September 2016). "Oscar 2017 Predictions: Dominican Republic chooses 'Flor de Azcuar' for the Oscars". Latin Post. Retrieved 9 September 2016. 
  8. ^ Lang, Jamie (24 August 2017). "Outsider Pictures Prepares U.S. Release for Dominican Republic Oscar Entry 'Woodpeckers'". Variety. Retrieved 26 August 2017. 
  9. ^ Scheib, Ronnie (2005-06-07). "Caribe Movie Review". Variety.