List of Georgia Bulldogs starting quarterbacks

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This is a list of every Georgia Bulldogs football team quarterback and the years they participated on the Georgia Bulldogs football team.

Main starting quarterbacks[edit]

1892 to 1894[edit]

The following players were the predominant quarters for the Bulldogs each season the team was a non-conference independent team, following the birth of Georgia football.

Name Years Started Notability References
W. N. Gramling 1892 Georgia's first quarterback.
George Butler 1893–1894 Captain in 1894. [1][2]

1895 to 1921[edit]

The following quarterbacks were the predominant quarters for the Bulldogs each season after the establishment of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association until the establishment of the Southern Conference.

Name Years Started Notability References
Craig Barrow 1895 Later a distinguished physician in Savannah. [1]
Richard Von Albade Gammon 1896 Led Georgia to its first undefeated season under Pop Warner. He is most famous for having died after injuries sustained in a collegiate football game, the next year, he moved to fullback. He died in the game against Virginia. [1]
Reynolds Tichenor 1897 Transferred from Auburn. He was quarterback when Richard Von Albade Gammon met his death. [1][3]
James "Kid" Huff 1898 The small quarterback once prevented a Vanderbilt touchdown by tackling the massive Wallace Crutchfield. [1][4]
Young 1899
Frank K. McCutcheon 1899–1900 [2]
Cam Dorsey 1900 [5]
Johnny Monahan 1901–1902 [1]
Harry Woodruff 1903–1904 Brother of "Kid" and known as "Big Kid". The two of them were the namesake of Woodruff Hall. [1]
John Dozier Lowndes 1905–1906 [1][2]
E. Farriss 1906 [1]
Kid Woodruff 1907–1908; 1910–1911 He took a year off in 1909 to travel around the U.S. and Mexico. He coached the "dream and wonder team" of 1927. Brother of Harry; the two of them were the namesake of Woodruff Hall. [1][2]
John Northcutt 1909
Hafford Hay 1909–1910 [6]
Homer Thompson 1910
Leon Covington 1912 [1]
David Paddock 1913–1915 3x All-Southern. Paddock went unnoticed his freshman year at halfback, until he was moved to the quarterback position in the game with Georgia Tech and led the Bulldogs to a 20 to 0 victory. Paddock is the only player in school history to have a petition circulated by the student body requesting that he play for the Bulldogs, he was its second ever All-American after Bob McWhorter. [1][6][7]
William Donnelly 1916
Buck Cheves 1919–1920 Head of the 1920 "ten second backfield" that went undefeated and was the first team of Georgia's to be called "Bulldogs." [1][8]
Sheldon Fitts 1920 Started the Florida game. [1]
Teany Randall 1921 [1]

1922 to 1932[edit]

The following quarterbacks were the predominant quarters for the Bulldogs each season after the establishment of the Southern Conference until the establishment of the Southeastern Conference.

Name Years Started Notability References
Dick Mulvehill 1922 [1][9]
Dave Collings 1922 Started the Vandy game. [1][9]
Scrappy Moore 1923–1925 Made the drop kick to beat Vandy. It was the game which injured Lynn Bomar, he coached the Chattanooga Mocs for many years, and is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach. [1][10]
Johnny Broadnax 1926–1927 Quarterback on the "dream and wonder team." In the 1940s he was assistant athletic director at UGA. [1]
H. F. Johnson 1926–1928 Quarterback on the "dream and wonder team." [1]
Moran 1929 [1]
Austin Downes 1929–1931 All-Southern. Led the 1930 team to wins over NYU and Yale, the 1931 team lost only to Southern Conference champion Tulane (whose only loss was in the Rose Bowl to USC) and National Champion USC. [1][6]
Leroy Young 1932 [11]

1933 to present[edit]

The following quarterbacks were the leading passer for the Bulldogs each season since joining the Southeastern Conference in 1933.

Name Years Started Notability References
Byron Griffith 1933–1934 [1]
Charlie Treadaway 1935 [1]
Andy Roddenberry 1936 [1]
Lewis Young 1936–1937 [1]
Wallace Miller 1937
Bob Salisbury 1938 [1]
Robin Nowell 1939 [1]
Paul Kluk 1940 [1]
Cliff Kimsey 1941 [1]
Walter Maguire 1942 [1]
Bobby Hague 1943 [1]
Billy Hodges 1944 [1]
John Rauch 1945–1948
Ray Prosperi 1949
Zeke Bratkowski 1950–1952
Jimmy Harper 1953–1955
Billy Hearn 1956
Charley Britt 1957–1959
Fran Tarkenton 1959–1960 Led the Bulldogs to the 1959 SEC Championship. He was a famed scrambler. College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. With the Minnesota Vikings, he had 3 Super Bowl appearances. Vikings Career Passing Yards Leader with 33,098. Vikings Career Passing Touchdowns Leader with 239. Vikings head coach Bud Grant flatly called Tarkenton "the greatest quarterback who's ever played." [12]
Larry Rakestraw 1961–1963
Lynn Hughes 1964
Kirby Moore 1965–1967 Led the Bulldogs to the 1966 SEC Championship.
Mike Cavan 1968–1970 Led the Bulldogs to the 1968 SEC Championship.
Andy Johnson 1971–1973
Matt Robinson 1974 With Ray Goff, led the Bulldogs to the 1976 SEC Championship.
Ray Goff 1975–1976 With Matt Robinson, led the Bulldogs to the 1976 SEC Championship.
Jeff Pyburn 1977–1979
Buck Belue 1979–1981 Led the Bulldogs to the 1980 National Championship. Led the Bulldogs to the 1980 and 1981 SEC Championships.
John Lastinger 1982–1983 Led the Bulldogs to the 1982 SEC Championship.
Todd Williams 1983–1984
James Jackson 1985–1987
Wayne Johnson 1988
Joe Dupree 1990-1991
Eric Zeier 1991–1994
Hines Ward 1995 Super Bowl MVP (XL). [13]
Mike Bobo 1995–1997
Quincy Carter 1998–2000
David Greene 2001–2004 Led the Bulldogs to the 2002 SEC Championship.
D. J. Shockley 2004–2005 Led the Bulldogs to the 2005 SEC Championship.
Joe Tereshinski 2005–2006
Matthew Stafford 2006–2008 Current starting quarterback for the Detroit Lions. 1st Overall Pick of the 2009 NFL Draft. AP NFL Comeback Player of the Year (2011). [14]
Joe Cox 2009
Aaron Murray 2010–2013 SEC Career Passing Yards Leader [15]
Hutson Mason 2014
Greyson Lambert 2015-2016
Faton Bauta 2015
Jacob Eason 2016
Jake Fromm 2017 Led the Bulldogs to the 2018 National Championship title game

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag Reed, Thomas Walter (c. 1949). "Athletics at the University from the Beginning Through 1947". History of the University of Georgia. dlg.galileo.usg.edu. Retrieved 2006-12-21. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Team Captains". 
  3. ^ "A History of Rome and Floyd County, State of Georgia, United States of America: Including Numerous Incidents of More Than Local Interest, 1540-1922". 1: 345. 
  4. ^ "Kid Huff". Atlanta Constitution. October 30, 1898. p. 19. Retrieved August 27, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  5. ^ "A Look Back: South Carolina". 
  6. ^ a b c Patrick Garbin. About Them Dawgs!: Georgia Football's Memorable Teams and Players. 
  7. ^ "Georgia All-Americans". 
  8. ^ Michael Bradley. Big Games: College Football's Greatest Rivalries. p. 151. 
  9. ^ a b "Mulvihill Out As Georgia Goes To Battle With Vandy". Athens Banner. November 18, 1922. 
  10. ^ "Andy "Scrappy" Moore". Retrieved February 4, 2015. 
  11. ^ Patrick Garbin. I Love Georgia/I Hate Florida. p. 77. 
  12. ^ "Fran Tarkenton". 
  13. ^ "Super Bowl MVPs". 
  14. ^ Clayton, John (April 24, 2009). "Sources: Matthew Stafford agrees to $41.7M, six-year deal with Detroit Lions". ESPN.com. 
  15. ^ Ching, David. "Aaron Murray (knee) leaves game". ESPN. Retrieved 25 November 2013.