List of German exonyms

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Below is a list of German language exonyms for formerly German places and places in non-German-speaking areas of the world :

Links to more extensive lists[edit]

Belgium
Croatia
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Hungary
Italy
Latvia
Poland
Slovakia
Slovenia
Switzerland

List of German exonyms for places in other areas[edit]

Albania[edit]

Belarus[edit]

Croatia[edit]

* For a more detailed list see : List of German exonyms for places in Croatia

Czech Republic[edit]

Denmark[edit]

Estonia[edit]

France[edit]

  • German exonyms in the Vosges department :
  • Vosges Wasgenwald or Vogesen / Wasgau
  • German exonyms in the Meuse department :
  • German exonyms in the Franche-Comté (Freigrafschaft Burgund) region:


Greece[edit]

Hungary[edit]

Italy[edit]

Province of Aosta[edit]

Province of Belluno[edit]

Province of Gorizia[edit]

Province of Pordenone[edit]

Province of Sondrio[edit]

Between 1512 and 1797 Valtellina and Valchiavenna were under the Graubünden domination.

Province of Trento[edit]

Trentino was under Austrian administration between 1815 and 1918.

Province of Trieste[edit]

Province of Udine[edit]

Latvia[edit]

Lithuania[edit]

see List of cities and towns in East Prussia

Luxembourg[edit]

Note that this list only includes towns whose German name is significantly different from the official (mainly French) spelling. Towns that differ in the ending only (-ange/-ingen), e.g. Wormeldange=Wormeldingen are not included in this list.

Moldova[edit]

Netherlands[edit]

Norway[edit]

  • Trondheim Drontheim (shortly used during World War II)

Poland[edit]

For further German places names see : List of German exonyms for places in Poland and List of cities and towns in East Prussia

Polish cities with German names[edit]

In addition there are several modern Polish cities that were settled with German names

Portugal[edit]

Romania[edit]

Russia[edit]

Russian cities with German names[edit]

In addition there are several Russian cities that were settled with German names
Cities renamed
  • Engels (founded as Pokrovskaya sloboda, renamed Pokrovsk in 1914. In 1931, when it became the capital of the Volga German SSR, now a part of Saratov, it was renamed after Friedrich Engels)[dubious ]
  • Jamburg (Settled as Yama or Yamsky Gorodok, renamed Jamburg, then Yamburg', now Kingisepp, Russian: Кингисе́пп)

Serbia[edit]

For German place names in the Vojvodina region, please see: German exonyms (Vojvodina)

Slovakia[edit]

Slovenia[edit]

For a more detailed list see: List of German exonyms for places in Slovenia

Spain[edit]

Sweden[edit]

Ukraine[edit]

Ukrainian settlements with German names[edit]

In addition there are several Ukrainian settlements that were settled with German names


Ukraine[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

Exonyms for places outside of Europe[edit]

Africa[edit]

Most place names in German East Africa continued to bear German spellings of the local names, such as Udjidji for Ujiji and Kilima-Ndscharo or Kilimandscharo for Mount Kilimanjaro. (Kigoma was known for a time as Rutschugi.) The few exceptions to the rule included

as well as German translations of some local phrases, such as Kleinaruscha for Arusha-Chini and Neu-Moschi for the settlement that is now known as Moshi. Lake Eyasi was known as the "Hohenlohe Sea", and the mission town of Sankt-Michael (St. Michael) near Kahama was formerly more important[citation needed].

China[edit]

Israel[edit]

Turkey[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barnes & Nobles Revised Atlas of World History