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List of Latin phrases

This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as vēnī, vīdī, vīcī and et cetera. Some of the phrases are themselves translations of Greek phrases, because Greek rhetoric and literature were esteemed in Ancient Rome when Latin rhetoric and literature were maturing; the Latin letter "i" may be used either as a consonant. In Medieval Latin, when "i" was used as a consonant, the letter "j", an orthographic "long'i'", used in initial positions and when it occurred between two other vowels, replaced it; this convention is preserved in Latin legal terminology. In this page, phrases that in Medieval Latin had the letter "j" replace their consonantal "i"s are enumerated as if beginning with "i". To view all phrases on a single, lengthy document, see: List of Latin phrases The list is divided alphabetically into twenty pages: Notable idioms and concepts in Latin Commonly used Latin phrases Latin abbreviations Over 1000 Latin terms and phrases

Outsourcing in Ukraine

Outsourcing in Ukraine — is a used type of services in Ukraine. Most outsourcing services are provided in the IT sphere, but they are popular in the spheres of logistics, marketing services, accounting and systematization of information, medical services, administration etc. IT outsourcing is the practice of the partial or complete using an external service provider to deliver some or IT functions required by a business. Most common services include managing infrastructure, directing strategy, business process outsourcing, software development, running the service desk etc. Ukraine has a long-standing reputation as a major technology region, with a well-developed scientific and educational base. In March 2013 Ukraine ranks fourth in the world in number of certified IT professionals after the United States and Russia. In 2017 Ukraine emerged as the top outsoursing destination of the year according to the Global Sourcing Association. By the year 2017, there were 13 R&D centers of global companies located in Ukraine.

According to the IT sector report 2019 Ukraine is the largest exporter of IT services in Europe and ranks among the 25 most attractive countries for software development worldwide. Ukraine is a European leader in the number of outsourcing companies in the field of artificial intelligence. According to research, 90% of Ukraine's IT services are outsourced to other countries. IT outsourcing is most developing industry on the outsourcing services market and Ukraine ranks second after India in terms of growth of this segment of IT in the world; as for 2019 the number of IT specialists involved in the IT industry of Ukraine reached 172,000 people. The number of IT professionals is expected to reach 200,000 by 2020; the share of IT industry in Ukraine's GDP is 4%. According to DOU’s annual job market research, conducted by the end of each year, the IT sector in Ukraine has grown by 60%, it is clear. In 2003, the IT outsourcing market in Ukraine amounted to $110 million, in 2007 — $544 million, in 2011 — $1.1 billion, in 2014 it reached nearly $2.4 billion.

In 2016 the outsourcing market of Ukraine was estimated at $3.2 billion the total income of information technology sphere amounted to $2.48 billion in 2017. IT-service export reached $3.6 billion in 2017. In 2015, Ukraine ranked 41th in the global outsource rating. In 2016-2017, Ukraine ranked 24th in the global outsource rating; the level of development of IT outsourcing in Ukraine allows to achieve positive macroeconomic effects that affect the economic development of the country. In the long term, these effects are capable of causing structural transformations that will shape new trends in the Ukrainian economy; the effects of the development of IT outsourcing in our country include:- improving the structure of the labor market. The rating is based on applications received and evaluated by an independent panel of judges from the IAOP; the main criteria for ranking are profitability, team growth, best projects, customer recommendations, corporate social responsibility and innovation in customer service delivery.

In 2018, 18 Ukrainian outsourcing companies have been included into this ranking. The concept of “outsourcing” in Ukrainian law has no definition, so it can be regulated in the context of analogy to certain legal rules. At the same time, the legislative field defines economic interaction through the conclusion of contracts, as well as the fact that everyone has the right to engage in business activities that are not prohibited by law. However, in the National Classifier of Ukraine, outsourcing is defined as an agreement according to which a customer delegates certain tasks to a contractor, in particular, the part of the production process or the whole production process, provision of recruitment services, support functions. According to Art. 6 of the Civil Code of Ukraine "The parties have the right to enter into an agreement, not provided for by the acts of civil law, but is consistent with the general principles of civil law", further in Art. 627 this position is extended "the parties are free to enter into a contract, select a contractor and determine the terms of the contract, taking into account the requirements of this Code, other acts of civil law, customs of business, the requirements of reasonableness and fairness."

This allows the parties to determine the nature of the contract at their discretion and to include outsourcing work in it

Mikael Samuelsson

Karl Mikael Samuelsson is a Swedish former professional ice hockey right winger. Samuelsson began his career in Sweden, starting with small town team IFK Mariefred, followed by Södertälje SK as a junior in 1994, he went on to play for Swedish teams IK Nyköping, Frölunda HC and Brynäs IF. After being selected 145th overall in the 1998 NHL Entry Draft by the San Jose Sharks, he moved to North America for the 2000–01 NHL season. Samuelsson spent short stints with the Sharks, New York Rangers, Pittsburgh Penguins and Florida Panthers, before returning to Europe during the 2004–05 NHL lockout; as NHL play resumed, Samuelsson signed with the Detroit Red Wings, where he enjoyed individual and team success, winning the Stanley Cup with the club in 2008. After four seasons in Detroit, he signed with the Vancouver Canucks in July 2009, he enjoyed the two most successful individual seasons of his career with Vancouver, recording back-to-back 50-point campaigns in 2009–10 and 2010–11. In his third year with the club, he was traded to the Panthers for his second stint in Florida.

At the end of the season, he re-signed with the Red Wings in July 2012. Internationally, Samuelsson is a member of the Triple Gold Club. In addition to his Stanley Cup championship, he has won gold medals with the Swedish national team at the 2006 Winter Olympics and 2006 World Championships. After playing for IFK Mariefred during his childhood, Samuelsson played junior with Södertälje SK of the J20 SuperElit, beginning in 1994–95. Scoring at a point-per-game pace at the junior level the following season, he was called up to the club's professional club, scoring five goals and an assist in 18 games, he helped Södertälje SK earn a promotion from the second-tier HockeyAllsvenskan to Sweden's premier league, the Elitserien, for the 1996–97 campaign. Debuting in the Elitserien, Samuelsson recorded six points over 29 games. While improving to 16 points in 31 games the following season, he played in ten games for IK Nyköping in the Allsvenskan. During the subsequent off-season, Samuelsson was selected in the fifth round, 145th overall, by the San Jose Sharks in the 1998 NHL Entry Draft.

Upon being drafted, he remained in Sweden for two more seasons. As Södertälje SK was demoted back to the Allsvenskan for the 1998–99 season, Samuelsson remained in the Elitserien by joining Frölunda HC, playing with both teams over the course of the season. While scoring 23 points over 18 games with Södertälje, he managed five points over 27 games with Frölunda; the following season, 1999–2000, Samuelsson transferred to Brynäs IF of the Elitserien and recorded seven points in 40 games. He helped the club to the second-best record in the regular season, before losing in the semifinals to Modo Hockey, he ranked second in team-scoring with nine points in 11 post-season games. Samuelsson moved to North America in 2000–01 to begin playing within the San Jose Sharks organization, he was assigned to the club's American Hockey League affiliate, the Kentucky Thoroughblades, out of training camp, where he spent the majority of the season. He had 78 points over 66 games in the AHL to finish seventh in League scoring.

Called up to the Sharks on two occasions over the course of the season, he appeared in his first four NHL games, recording no points. In the subsequent off-season, Samuelsson was traded to the New York Rangers, along with fellow prospect Christian Gosselin, in exchange for veteran forward Adam Graves on June 24, 2001, he began the 2001–02 season with the Rangers' AHL affiliate, the Hartford Wolf Pack, but after notching nine points in eight games, he was recalled to the NHL on November 5. He scored his first two NHL goals on November 20 against goaltender Patrick Roy in a 5–3 win against the Colorado Avalanche. Samuelsson's first goal came short-handed and broke Roy's three-game shutout streak, in contention to tie the modern-day NHL record at the time of four games. Samuelsson remained with the Rangers for the rest of the season and recorded six goals and 16 assists over 67 games as an NHL rookie, he was utilized in defensive roles during his time in New York, playing on the penalty kill and matching up against opposing teams' top offensive lines.

In the off-season, Samuelsson was re-signed by the Rangers and made the club's opening roster for the 2002–03 campaign. Late in the season, he was dealt to the Pittsburgh Penguins in an eight-player trade on February 10, 2003. Along with Samuelsson, the Rangers sent Rico Fata, Joël Bouchard, Richard Lintner and cash to the Penguins in exchange for Alexei Kovalev, Dan LaCouture, Janne Laukkanen and Mike Wilson. Samuelsson scored two goals in 22 games with the Penguins to finish his second NHL season with a combined 10 goals and 24 points between Pittsburgh and New York. Looking to move up in the 2003 NHL Entry Draft, the Penguins traded him on draft-day, along with their first- and second-round picks, to the Florida Panthers in exchange for the first overall selection that year and a third-round pick on June 21, 2003. Samuelsson spent most of his time with the Panthers on the injured reserve list, beginning with a fractured jaw after receiving a high-stick from Branislav Mezei on November 22, 2003.

He did not return until January 2004. That same month, Samuelsson fractured his hand. After finishing the campaign with nine points in 37 games, he was not tendered a qualifying offer by the Panthers and subsequently became a free agent; as it became apparent that the following NHL season would be suspended due to a lockout, Samuelsson signed with Genève-Servette HC of the Swiss National League A in September 2004. He appeared in 12 games for t

Palazzo Grassi

Palazzo Grassi is a building in the Venetian Classical style located on the Grand Canal of Venice, between the Palazzo Moro Lin and the campo San Samuele. During the 16th century, the building was owned by the Cini family. On February 1605, Alamanno Aragon Hocheppan, grandson of Cosimo I, acquired it; the Grassi family first moved in the building in 1655. The Palazzo Grassi was designed by Giorgio Massari, rebuilt between 1748 and 1772. Massari started the Palazzo while he was finishing the Ca' Rezzonico on the opposite bank of the river. A latecomer among the palaces on the Grand Canal of Venice, Palazzo Grassi has an academic classical style, in contrast to the surrounding Byzantine Romanesque and Baroque Venetian palazzi, it has a formal palace façade, constructed of white marble, but lacks the lower mercantile openings typical of many Venetian patrician palaces. The main stairwell is frescoed by Michelangelo Morlaiter and Francesco Zanchi, the ceilings are decorated by the artists Giambattista Canal and Christian Griepenkerl.

The Palazzo Grassi was the last palace to be built on the Grand Canal before the fall of the Venetian Republic, the largest-sited. The Grassi family sold the palazzo in 1840, with ownership that followed passing through many different individuals. In 1857, the building was bought by Baron Simeone De Sina. A small scenic garden was created adjacent to the building. In 1951, the building became the International Centre of Costume; the adjacent garden was turned into an open-air theatre, covered in the 1960s. The International Centre for Arts and Costume closed in 1983; the Palazzo was purchased by the Fiat Group in 1983, under the late chairman Gianni Agnelli, it underwent a complete restoration overseen by architect Gae Aulenti. The group's aim was to transform Palazzo Grassi into an exhibition hall for the visual arts, it continues to be used as an art gallery today. Between 1984 and 1990, Pontus Hultén was in charge of the art museum which contained a 600-seat outdoor theatre. In 1990, the architect Aldo Rossi received the Pritzker Architecture Prize in this building.

In May 2005, the French entrepreneur François Pinault bought the Palazzo Grassi for 29 million euros. The remodeling of the building was assigned to the Japanese architect Tadao Ando; the Palazzo reopened in April 2006 with the exhibit Where Are We Going?. The Palazzo is divided in 40 rooms. Jean-Jacques Aillagon was the museum's first director. In 2007, François Pinault acquired the Punta della Dogana to transform it into a contemporary art museum paired with the Palazzo Grassi; the replanning of the building, in disrepair when acquired, was assigned to Tadao Ando. The Punta della Dogana reopened after 14 months of renovation. In 2013, Tadao Ando redesigned the Teatrino into a 225-seat auditorium. Since 2006, Palazzo Grassi has been presenting temporary exhibitions from the Pinault Collection: Where Are We Going? A selection of works from the Pinault Collection, curated by Alison Gingeras, April 2006 - October 2006 Picasso, la joie de vivre. 1945-1948, curated by Jean-Louis Andral, November 2006 - March 2007 François Pinault Collection: a Post-Pop Selection, curated by Alison Gingeras, November 2006 - March 2007 Sequence 1 – Painting and Sculpture from the François Pinault Collection, curated by Alison Gingeras, May 2007 – November 2007 Rome and the barbarians.

The Birth of a New World, curated by Jean-Jacques Aillagon, January 2008 – July 2008 Italics. Italian Art Between Traditions and Revolutions, 1968-2008, curated by Francesco Bonami, September 2008 - March 2009 Mapping the Studio: Artists from the François Pinault Collection, curated by Francesco Bonami and Alison Gingeras. Presented at Palazzo Grassi and at Punta della Dogana. June 2009 – April 2011 The World Belongs to You, curated by Caroline Bourgeois, June 2011 – February 2012 Madame Fisscher, solo exhibition by Urs Fischer curated in collaboration with Caroline Bourgeois, April 2012 – July 2012 Voice of Images, curated by Caroline Bourgeois, August 2012 – January 2013 Rudolf Stingel, solo exhibition curated by the artist in collaboration with Elena Geuna, April 2013 – January 2014 The Illusion of Light, curated by Caroline Bourgeois, April 2014 – January 2015 Irving Penn, curated by Pierre Apraxine and Matthieu Humery, April 2014 – January 2015 Martial Raysse, curated by Caroline Bourgeois in collaboration with the artist, April 2015 – November 2015 Sigmar Polke, curated by Elena Geuna and Guy Tosatto, April 2016 – November 2016 Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable, Damien Hirst, curated by Elena Geuna.

Presented at Palazzo Grassi and at Punta della Dogana. April 2017 – December 2017 Cows by the Water, Albert Oehlen, curated by Caroline Bourgeois, April 2018 - January 2019 La Pelle, Luc Tuymans, curated by the artist in collaboration with Caroline Bourgeois, March 2019 - January 2020 The Palazzo Grassi was designed by Giorgio Massari; the main stairwell was frescoed by Michelangelo Morlaiter. and Francesco Zanchi. The ceilings were decorated by Giovanni Battista Christian Griepenkerl. Giorgio Massari Gianni Agnelli François Pinault Punta della Dogana Philip Jodidio, Tadao Ando Venice: The Pinault Collection at the Palazzo Grassi and the Punta Della Dogana, ed. Skira Rizzoli, 28 September 2010 Official website

Calcareous dinoflagellate cysts

Calcareous dinoflagellate cysts or calcareous dinocysts are dinoflagellate cysts produced by a group of peridinoid dinoflagellates, called calcareous dinoflagellates. Organisms producing calcareous structures are found in a small group of peridinoid dinoflagellates, called calcareous dinoflagellates; such calcareous structures are either dinocysts, which are formed during the life cycle or found in vegetative stages. The potential to produce calcareous structures has been considered as apomorphic within alveolates, arguing for the monophyly of Calciodinellaceae. Calciodinellaceae comprise 35 extant species of calcareous dinophytes, plus about 260 fossil species, they are distributed in cold through tropical seas of the world. Calcareous cysts are deposited in both marine sediments that are oceanic; the first freshwater dinoflagellate that produces calcareous cysts was discovered. According to the fossil record, calcareous dinoflagellates originate in the Upper Triassic and are diverse during the Cretaceous and throughout the Tertiary.

Due to their long stratigraphic range, many fossil species have been described. By contrast, descriptions of extant species are based on the motile stages; this has led to two distinct systematics: paleontological and neontological

Football Annual

The Football Annual was a reference work published annually from 1868 to 1908. It reported on the various codes of football played in England. Association and rugby football provided its main focus, but it included some material on public school football, Sheffield football, and, on occasion Australian and American football. A typical issue would include laws of the various codes, a summary of the preceding season, a listing of football clubs in England, essays about aspects of the game; the Football Annual was edited for its entire existence by Charles Alcock. Upon Alcock's death in early 1907, the two final editions were edited by others, it ceased publication after the 1908 edition. Alcock, Charles W.. John Lillywhite's Football Annual. London: John Lillywhite. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Sportsman. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Sportsman. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual.

London: Virtue. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Virtue. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Virtue. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Virtue. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Virtue. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Ward, Lock, & Tyler. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Cricket Press. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Cricket Press. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Cricket Press. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Cricket Press. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W..

Football Annual. London: Cricket Press. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Wright & Co. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Wright & Co. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Cricket Press. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Wright & Co. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. London: Wright & Co. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. Merritt & Hatcher. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. Merritt & Hatcher. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. Merritt & Hatcher. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. Merritt & Hatcher. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. Merritt & Hatcher. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual.

Merritt & Hatcher. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. Merritt & Hatcher. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. Merritt & Hatcher. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Alcock, Charles W.. Football Annual. Merritt & Hatcher. CS1 maint: extra text: authors list Football Annual. London: "Cricket" offices. 1907. Football Annual. London: Merritt & Hatcher. 1908. Athletic News Football Annual James Lillywhite's Cricketers' Annual