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List of London Underground stations

The London Underground is a metro system in the United Kingdom that serves Greater London and the home counties of Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire. Its first section opened in 1863, making it the oldest underground metro system in the world – although in fact 55% of the current network is above ground, as it runs on the surface in outlying suburbs; the system comprises eleven lines – Bakerloo, Circle, Hammersmith & City, Metropolitan, Piccadilly, Waterloo & City – serving 270 stations. It is operated by Transport for London. Most of the system is north of the River Thames, with six London boroughs in the south of the city not served by the Underground; the London Borough of Hackney, to the north, has two stations on its border. Some stations at the north-eastern end of the Central line are in the Epping Forest district of Essex and some stations at the north-western end of the Metropolitan line are in the Three Rivers and Watford districts of Hertfordshire and the Chiltern district of Buckinghamshire.

There are two instances where two separate stations share the same name: there is one Edgware Road station on the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines and another Edgware Road on the Bakerloo line, there is one Hammersmith station on the District and Piccadilly lines and another Hammersmith station on the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines. Although the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines station at Paddington is on the other side of the main line station to the Bakerloo and District lines station, it is shown as a single station on the current Tube map, it has been shown as two separate stations at different times in the past. TfL plans to open two new stations by 2021 as a result of extensions to the Northern line. Listed for each of the 270 stations are the line serving it, local authority and the fare zone in which it is located, the date it and any earlier main line service opened, previous names and passenger usage statistics in millions per year. Transport for London is planning an extension to the Northern line that will add two new stations to the network, both in Wandsworth.

List of London railway stations List of Docklands Light Railway stations List of former and unopened London Underground stations List of busiest London Underground stations London Underground stations that are listed buildings Timeline of the London Underground Category:Tube stations in London by borough Category:Railway stations in London by borough * ^ Where more than one line serves a station, lines are listed in the order of opening. In some cases stations were first served by one underground line but transferred to another: a ^ First served by Metropolitan line – Circle line services separately identified in 1949. B 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 First served by Metropolitan line – Circle line services separately identified in 1949, Hammersmith & City line services separately identified in 1990. C 1 2 3 4 5 First served by Metropolitan line – District line service added in stages, Circle line services separately identified in 1949. D 1 2 3 First served by Metropolitan line – Hammersmith & City line services separately identified in 1990.

E 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 First served by Metropolitan line – service transferred to Bakerloo line in 1939 and to the Jubilee line in 1979. F 1 2 First served by Metropolitan line – Bakerloo line service added in 1939, transferred to the Jubilee line in 1979. G 1 2 First served by Bakerloo line – service transferred to Jubilee line in 1979. H 1 2 3 4 5 First served by District line – service transferred to Piccadilly line in 1933. I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 First served by District line – Circle line services separately identified in 1949. J 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 First served by District line – Metropolitan line service added in stages, transferred to Hammersmith & City line in 1990. K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 First served by Metropolitan line – District line service added in 1910, transferred to Piccadilly line in 1933. L 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 First served by District line – service transferred to Piccadilly line in 1964. M 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 First served by Metropolitan line – Hammersmith & City line services separately identified in 1990, Circle line service added in 2009.

N 1 2 First served by Bakerloo line – service withdrawn in 1982. † ^. People travelling through these stations may treat the station as in whatever zone makes their fare the less expensive. Connor, J. E.. London's Disused Underground Stations. Capital Transport. ISBN 1-85414-250-X. OCLC 57630283. Gillham, John C.. The Waterloo & City Railway. Oakwood Press. ISBN 978-0-85361-525-5. OCLC 59402958. Leboff, David. ABC London Underground Stations. Ian Allan. ISBN 0-7110-2226-7. Lee, Charles E.. The Bakerloo line, a Brief History. London: London Transport. OCLC 59998073. Lee, Charles E; the Central line, a Brief History. London: London Transport. OCLC 3470185. Lee, Charles E.. The District line, a Brief History. London: London Transport. OCLC 59998301. Lee, Charles E.. The East London Line and the Thames Tunnel, a Brief History. London: London Transport. OCLC 24459581. Lee, Charles E.. The Metropolitan line, a Brief History. London: London Transport. OCLC 59998061. Lee, Charles E.. The Northern line, a Brief History. London: London Transport.

OCLC 59998137. Lee, Charles E.. The Piccadilly line, a Brief History. London: London Transport. OCLC 59998126. Menear, Laurence. London's Underground Stations: a social and architectural study. Midas Books. ISBN 978-0-85936-124-8. OCLC 12695214. Wolmar, Christian; the Subterranean Railway: How the London Underground Was Built and How It Changed the City Forever. Atlantic Books. ISBN 1-84354-023-1. OCLC 60794863. Tube –

Weston-super-Mare Sand Sculpture Festival

The Weston-super-Mare Sand Sculpture Festival has been held annually since 2005 on the beach at Weston-super-Mare in the English county of Somerset. The festival has earned Weston the title of “Sand Sculpting Capital” of the UK; the artists at the Sand festival use water to make sculptures. The exhibition is open from April until October each year; the first festival in 2006 used 30 tonnes of sand, featured a giant King Kong. By 2014 5,000 tonnes of sand from the beach was used by 20 international artists to create exhibits. North Somerset sponsored the event, however in 2012 they stopped their funding and alternative sponsors were sought; the 2013 festival was themed around Hollywood. The 2014 festival was based on the a theme of Once Upon a Time and included exhibits from traditional children's stories such as Beatrix Potter, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, The Chronicles of Narnia, it included some, made into films such as Game of Thrones, The Hobbit and The Hunger Games.£2,000 was donated for the development of art education at the site by the Town Council.

Art students from Weston College assisted with some of the creation of the sculptures. In May three of the 30 sculptures were damaged by vandals. Weston super Mare sand festival

Apple Thief

"Apple Thief" is the name of the eleventh episode of the third season of the American animated television series Adventure Time. The episode was written and storyboarded by Tom Herpich and Bert Youn, from a story by Mark Banker, Kent Osborne, Patrick McHale, series creator Pendleton Ward, it aired on Cartoon Network on August 1, 2011 and guest stars Ron Lynch as Mr. Pig; the series follows the adventures of Finn, a human boy, his best friend and adoptive brother Jake, a dog with magical powers to change shape and grow and shrink at will. In this episode, the apples of Tree Trunks are stolen and Jake dive into the slums of the Candy Kingdom to find the thief. Finn and Jake arrive at the house of Tree Trunk to discover, they resolve to help her track down the thieves, bring them to justice, return her stolen fruit. Finn and Jake go to the candy tavern, after convincing the bartender that they are rogues, are given the location of a gang who trade apples; however and Jake soon learn that "apples" is street-slang for "diamonds", which this gang is trading.

The gang catches Finn and Jake, the two are nearly eaten by a reluctant pig that the criminals use to dispose of their enemies, but they manage to escape with Mr. Pig in tow. Back at Tree Trunks's house, Mr. Pig claims. Aftering opening up a closet, dozens of apples spill out, causing Tree Trunks to think that she is the thief. Finn, soon deduces that a family of magpiles stole all her apples and inadvertently stored them in the closet. "Apple Thief" was written and storyboarded by Tom Herpich and Bert Youn from a story developed by Mark Banker, Patrick McHale, Kent Osborne, series creator Pendleton Ward. During the production of "Apple Thief", Youn was living in South Korea undergoing mandatory army training with the South Korean military, whereas Herpich was living in Los Angeles. Unlike how Youn and Jesse Moynihan communicated with one another via the Internet when they worked on the previous third-season episode "Hitman", Youn and Herpich kept to themselves, as they each trusted the other to remain faithful to the episode's outline.

One of the lines dialogue in this episode, written by Herpich, features Tree Trunks referring to a character as looking like an army brat. Herpich did not understand what he meant when he wrote it, but he felt it was inherently funny and "trusted his gut". Ward, confused by the line, wanted to cut it. After a test screening of the line provided a large laugh, Ward agreed to include the line; the opening scene, which features Jake preparing a number of Korean dishes, was Ward's idea, inspired by Youn's love of cooking Korean cuisine. When the animation for the episode was sent back to California, all of the trees in Tree Trunks' orchard had apples on them; these in turn had to be painted out one by one by art director Nick Jennings to maintain consistency with the episode's storyline. Many of the gang members were brought back as gender-bent versions of themselves in the fifth-season episode "Bad Little Boy"; this was because Rebecca Sugar, co-storyboarder for said episode, felt that they fit in with the "rough" nature of Lumpy Space Prince's party.

The voice for the banana guards was inspired by a time Ward imitated John DiMaggio's voice for Jake. Tom Kenny overheard this attempt and, parroted it back at Ward. Ward, in turn, enjoyed Kenny's rendition. Ron Lynch voiced both Mr. Pig. After the completion of this episode, Ward wanted Mr. Pig to come back because he felt that both the character and Lynch's voice acting were funny; the design for Mr. Pig was settled upon late in the production of the episode. According to Youn, he and Herpich each drew a rudimentary pig design, since neither could agree with the other, due to their aforementioned communication issues.. "Apple Thief" first aired on Cartoon Network on October 3, 2011. The episode was viewed by 2 million viewers and scored a 0.3 Nielsen rating in the 18- to 49-year-old demographic. Nielsen ratings are audience measurement systems that determine the audience size and composition of television programming in the United States, which means that the episode was seen by 0.3 percent of all households aged 18 to 49 years old were watching television at the time of the episode's airing.

The episode first saw physical release as part of the complete third season DVD on February 25, 2014. It was re-released as part of the DVD complication set Frost & Fire on March 3, 2015. "Apple Thief" on IMDb "Apple Thief" at TV.com