List of NCAA Division I men's basketball career free throw scoring leaders

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Tyler Hansbrough made an NCAA-record 982 free throws.

In basketball, a free throw is "an opportunity given to a player to score one (1) point, uncontested, from position behind the free throw line and inside the semicircle."[1] The National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) Division I is the highest level of amateur basketball in the United States; the NCAA did not split into its current divisions format until August 1973.[2] From 1906 to 1955, there were no classifications to the NCAA nor its predecessor, the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States (IAAUS).[2] Then, from 1956 to spring 1973, colleges were classified as either "NCAA University Division (Major College)" or "NCAA College Division (Small College)".[2]

The all-time leader in NCAA free throws made is Tyler Hansbrough of North Carolina.[3][4] From 2005–06 through 2008–09, Hansbrough made 982 free throws, surpassing the 54-year-old record of 905 that was held by Wake Forest's Dickie Hemric.[3][5] While Hansbrough's free throw percentage (79.1%) is better than Hemric's (66.6%), Hemric accomplished the feat in only 104 career games played compared to Hansbrough's 142.

Five players on this list are Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame inductees: Pete Maravich,[6] Oscar Robertson,[7] Bill Bradley[8] Joe Dumars,[9] and Alonzo Mourning;[10] some players on this list, such as those whose career games played is below 100, played college basketball during the era before freshmen were allowed to play varsity basketball, and were instead allowed to play freshman or junior varsity basketball only. Their free throw makes and attempts could have been significantly higher had they played an additional season.

George Washington University is the only school that has multiple members on the top 25 all-time free throws made list: Chris Monroe (719)[11] and Joe Holup (714).[12] Only one player in the top 25 split his college career between two different schools. Steve Rogers, who scored 713 free throws between 1988 and 1992, attended Middle Tennessee before transferring to Alabama State.

Key[edit]

Free throw leaders[edit]

Alonzo Mourning of Georgetown made 771 free throws.
Player Pos. Team Games
played
Career start Career end FTM FTA FT% Ref.
Tyler Hansbrough F North Carolina 142 2005 2009 982 1241 79.1 [4]
Dickie Hemric C Wake Forest 104 1951 1955 905 1359 66.6 [5]
Pete Maravich* G LSU 83 1967 1970 893 1152 77.5 [13]
Oscar Robertson* G/F Cincinnati 88 1957 1960 869 1114 78.0 [14]
Caleb Green F Oral Roberts 128 2003 2007 852 1134 75.1 [15]
Don Schlundt C Indiana 94 1951 1955 826 1076 76.8 [16]
Troy Bell G Boston College 122 1999 2003 810 933 86.8 [17]
Bill Bradley* F/G Princeton 83 1962 1965 791 903 87.6 [18]
Mike Daum F South Dakota State 136 2015 2019 786 927 84.8 [19]
Alonzo Mourning* C Georgetown 120 1988 1992 771 1003 75.4 [20]
Derrick Chievous F Missouri 130 1984 1988 764 963 79.3 [21]
Eddie Benton G Vermont 104 1992 1996 739 891 82.9 [22]
Chris Clemons G Campbell 130 2015 2019 733 860 85.2 [23]
Howie Crittenden G Murray State 104 1952 1956 731 1041 70.2 [24]
Tyler Haws G BYU 139 2009 2015[25] 724 820 88.3 [26]
Joe Dumars* G McNeese State 116 1981 1985 723 917 78.8 [27]
Malcolm Delaney G Virginia Tech 136 2007 2011 721 853 84.5 [28]
Chris Monroe G George Washington 118 1999 2003 719 955 75.3 [11]
Joe Holup F George Washington (2) 104 1952 1956 714 961 74.3 [12]
Terry Dischinger G/F Purdue 70 1959 1962 713 871 81.9 [3]
Christian Laettner F/C Duke 148 1988 1992 713 885 80.6 [29]
Steve Rogers G/F Middle Tennessee /
Alabama State
113 1988 1992 713 955 74.7 [11]
Don MacLean F/C UCLA 127 1988 1992 711 827 86.0 [30]
Michael Anderson G Drexel 115 1984 1988 705 958 73.6 [31]
Byron Houston F Oklahoma State 127 1988 1992 698 957 72.9 [32]

References[edit]

General
  • "2018–19 NCAA Men's Basketball Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2018. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
Specific
  1. ^ "Basketball glossary". FIBA.com. Retrieved May 24, 2010.
  2. ^ a b c "History of the NCAA". NCAA.org. National Collegiate Athletic Association. Archived from the original on September 24, 2010. Retrieved May 25, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. ^ a b c "2009–10 NCAA Men's Basketball Records" (PDF). 2009–10 NCAA Men's Basketball Media Guide. National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2009. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  4. ^ a b "Tyler Hansbrough". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  5. ^ a b Sumner, Jim (February 4, 2009). "Looking Back... Dickie Hemric's Record-Setting Career". theACC.com. Atlantic Coast Conference. Archived from the original on March 22, 2012. Retrieved May 29, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  6. ^ "Peter P. "Pete" Maravich". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on August 31, 2012. Retrieved May 29, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  7. ^ "Oscar P. Robertson". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on March 4, 2010. Retrieved May 28, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  8. ^ "William W. "Bill" Bradley". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on February 15, 2011. Retrieved May 28, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  9. ^ "Joe Dumars". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on August 7, 2009. Retrieved May 28, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  10. ^ Joseph, Adi (April 7, 2014). "Alonzo Mourning, Gary Williams lead Hall of Fame class". USA Today. Gannett Company. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  11. ^ a b c "Career Leaders and Records for Free Throws". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  12. ^ a b "GW's Greatest Basketball Players: Joe Holup". George Washington University. April 27, 2000. Retrieved May 29, 2010.[permanent dead link]
  13. ^ "Pete Maravich". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  14. ^ "Oscar Robertson". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  15. ^ "Caleb Green stats". ESPN. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  16. ^ Bozich, Alex (August 6, 2008). "ITH Super Happy Fun Time Top 10 List: Don Schlundt". InsidetheHall.com. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  17. ^ "Troy Bell profile". Boston College. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  18. ^ "Bill Bradley". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  19. ^ "Mike Daum". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  20. ^ "Alonzo Mourning". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  21. ^ "Derrick Chievous". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  22. ^ "America East Career Free Throw Leaders" (PDF). Men's Basketball. America East Conference. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  23. ^ "Chris Clemons". sports-reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  24. ^ "The History of the Ohio Valley Conference". CollegeHoopsNet.com. June 14, 2004. Archived from the original on September 27, 2011. Retrieved May 29, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  25. ^ Following Haws' freshman season of 2009–10, he spent two years on a Mormon mission and did not play his sophomore season until 2012–13.
  26. ^ "Tyler Haws". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference, LLC. March 18, 2015. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  27. ^ "Joe Dumars". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  28. ^ "Malcolm Delaney". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 4, 2012.
  29. ^ "Christian Laettner". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  30. ^ "Don MacLean". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  31. ^ "Michael Anderson". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2010.
  32. ^ "Byron Houston". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2010.