List of Sewanee Tigers head football coaches

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The Sewanee Tigers college football team represents Sewanee: The University of the South (Sewanee) in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III. The school is a founding member of the Southern Athletic Association (SAA), a conference chartered in 2011 by seven former members of the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) and one other invited member that played its first season in 2012. Sewanee had been a charter member of the SCAC as well. The program has had 30 head coaches since it began play during the 1891 season.[1] Since April 2011, Tommy Laurendine has served as Sewanee's head coach.[2]

The team has played more than 970 games over 116 seasons.[1] In that time, Seven coaches won conference championships: J. G. Jayne[dead link], Billy Suter[dead link] and Harris G. Cope[dead link] won a combined three as a member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA); and Shirley Majors, Horace Moore, Bill Samko and John Windham won a combined ten as a member of the CAC/SCAC.[1] Majors is the leader in seasons coached and games won, with 172 victories during his 21 years with the program.[1] J. J. Quill[dead link] and A. G. Erwin[dead link] have the highest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .889.[3] Robert Black has the lowest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .105.[3] Of the 30 different head coaches who have led the Tigers, and Harvey Harman[4] has been inducted as head coaches into the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Indiana.

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
No. Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

List of head football coaches showing season(s) coached, overall records, conference records, championships and selected awards[A 5]
No. Name Term
[A 6]
GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% CC NC Awards
1 F. G. Sweat 1891–1893 16 8 6 2 .563 0
2 H. C. Foss 1894 8 3 5 0 .375 0
3 R. M. Reynolds 1895 5 2 2 1 .500 0 2 1 .167 0 0
4 J. E. Blair 1896 6 3 3 0 .500 1 3 0 .250 0 0
5 J. G. Jayne 1897–1898 9 5 3 1 .611 2 2 1 .500 1 0
6 Billy Suter 1899–1901 28 22 3 3 .839 17 2 1 .875 1 0
7 L. W. Boynton 1902 9 7 2 0 .778 4 2 0 .667 0 0
8 George S. Whitney 1903–1904 16 14 2 0 .875 9 2 0 .818 0 0
9 H. C. Hyatt 1905 7 4 2 1 .643 2 1 1 .625 0 0
10 J. J. Quill 1906 9 8 1 0 .889 5 1 0 .833 0 0
11 A. G. Erwin 1907 9 8 1 0 .889 6 1 0 .857 0 0
12 Harry Van Surdam 1908 8 4 1 3 .688 2 1 1 .625 0 0
13 Harris G. Cope 1909–1916 68 43 18 7 .684 19 13 6 .579 1 0
14 Charles Best 1917–1918 13 7 4 2 .615 4 3 2 .556 0 0
15 Earl Abell 1919–1920 17 7 9 1 .441 1 7 1 .167 0 0
16 John P. Nicholson 1921–1922 16 9 6 1 .594 4 5 1 .450 0 0
17 M. S. Bennett 1923–1928 52 21 29 2 .423 6 21 0 .222 0 0
18 W. H. Kirkpatrick 1928–1929 11 2 7 2 .273 0 6 1 .071 0 0
19 Harvey Harmandagger 1930 10 3 6 1 .350 1 4 0 .200 0 0
20 Harry E. Clark 1931–1939 80 21 56 3 .281 3 45 0 .063 0 0
21 Jenks Gillem 1940–1941 15 5 10 0 .333 0 1 0 .000 0 0
22 William C. White 1946–1953 64 38 23 3 .617 0
23 Ernie Williamson 1954–1956 25 2 22 1 .100 0
24 Shirley Majors 1957–1977 172 93 74 5 .555 36 24 0 .600 4 0
25 Horace Moore 1978–1986 80 38 42 0 .475 23 17 0 .575 3 0
26 Bill Samko 1987–1993 63 35 27 1 .563 14 14 1 .500 2 0
27 Al Logan 1994–1995 18 4 14 0 .222 2 6 0 .250 0 0
28 John Windham 1996–2006 106 45 61 .425 24 39 .381 1 0
29 Robert Black 2007–2010 38 4 34 .105 1 26 .037 0 0
30 Tommy Laurendine 2011–2016 30 12 18 .400 6 10 .375 0 0

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[5]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[6]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[7]
  5. ^ Statistics correct as of the end of the 2011 college football season.
  6. ^ Sewanee did not field teams from the 1942 through 1945 seasons due to World War II.[1]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ a b c d e 2008 Sewanee Tigers Football Media Guide, pp. 32–37
  2. ^ Holder, Robert (2011-04-15). "Laurendine finds 'right fit' at Sewanee". The Oak Ridger. Retrieved 2011-08-17. 
  3. ^ a b "Sewanee Coaching Records". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved August 31, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Hall of Famers: Harvey Harman". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2011-08-17. [permanent dead link]
  5. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  6. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today. McLean, Virginia. Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009.  Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Ties" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page). Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Ties" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  7. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times. New York City. Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009.  Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "TieCalc" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page). Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "TieCalc" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).