List of Sinfonians

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

This is a list of distinguished members of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity who have achieved significant recognition in their respective fields, including (but not limited to) education, film, industry, literature, music, philanthropy, public service, radio, science, and television.

In determining the classification for each Sinfonian listed here, an attempt was made to classify the individual based on what he is most known for. In some cases, a person such as Aaron Copland may be known equally as a conductor and a composer. In other cases, an individual such as Branford Marsalis may be known equally as a jazz musician and a television personality.

Honorary members are in italics, charter members are in bold.

"Big band" leaders[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Percy Faith Gamma Omega (1963) Bandleader, known for arrangements of "easy listening" music
Hal Kemp Alpha Rho (1926) Jazz alto saxophonist, clarinetist, bandleader, composer, and arranger; member of the Big Band and Jazz Hall of Fame; had four number one hits in the 1930s
Buddy Morrow Rho Tau (1968) Conductor of the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra, 1977-2010 [1]
Paul Whiteman Epsilon Zeta (1956) American bandleader and orchestral director; commissioned Rhapsody in Blue by George Gershwin [2]

Businessmen and philanthropists[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
George Banta Alpha (1917) Founder of the George Banta Company (later known as Banta Corporation); served as historian of Phi Delta Theta fraternity and is honored as a "second founder" of that fraternity in recognition of his contributions to its development and expansion; instrumental in the expansion of Delta Gamma women's fraternity, of which he remains the only male initiate, and was an advocate of collegiate Greek life; mayor of Menasha, Wisconsin in 1892, 1895, and 1902–1903
Andrew Carnegie Alpha (1917) Founder of Pittsburgh's Carnegie Steel Company which later became United States Steel; philanthropist; namesake of Carnegie-Mellon University, Carnegie Hall, and numerous libraries [3]
George Eastman Alpha Nu (1927) Founded Eastman Kodak Company, invented the roll of film, and endowed the establishment of the Eastman School of Music [4][5]
Henry Clay Frick Alpha (1917) Industrialist, financier, and art patron; founder of H. C. Frick & Company; chairman of the Carnegie Steel Company; played a major role in the formation of the giant United States Steel [6][7]
Major Henry Lee Higginson Alpha (1915) Survivor of the Battle of Aldie; founded the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1881; served as President of the Boston Music Hall and as trustee of the New England Conservatory of Music, 1892-1919 [8]
Otto H. Kahn Alpha (1917) Investment banker, collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts; built Oheka Castle, the second largest private home in the US; served as Chairman of the National Music Week Committee of the National Bureau for the Advancement of Music in the 1920s
Harvey S. Mudd Beta Psi (1941) Mining engineer; founder, investor, and president of the Cyprus Mines Corporation; namesake of Harvey Mudd College, a science and engineering college in Claremont, California
Charles M. Schwab Alpha (1917) Industrialist; steel magnate; under his leadership, Bethlehem Steel became the second largest steel maker in the US, and one of the most important heavy manufacturers in the world
Henry Z. Steinway Alpha Alpha (1962) Philanthropist; heir to Steinway piano manufacturing legacy; president of Steinway & Sons, 1955–1977; awarded the National Medal of Arts in 2007; founding president of the Museum of Making Music in Carlsbad, California [9][10]
Henry Lee Higginson, portrait by John Singer Sargent (1903)
Andrew Carnegie, c. 1913

Composers[edit]

Band/winds[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Richard Franko Goldman Beta Omicron (1940) Band director; son of Edwin Franko Goldman, founder of the American Bandmasters Association
Percy A. Grainger Beta Omicron (1940) Australian-born pianist; champion of the saxophone and concert band
David Holsinger Beta Mu (1964) Two-time recipient of the Sousa/Ostwald Award given by the American Bandmasters Association for best band composition [11]
Martin Mailman Zeta Psi (1961) Prolific and well-decorated composer; two-time recipient of the Sousa/Ostwald Award [11]
David Maslanka Rho Tau (2008) Best known for his wind band works including "A Child's Garden of Dreams"; two-time recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts Composer Award [12]
W. Francis McBeth Alpha Iota (1957) Winner of the Presley Award at Hardin-Simmons University in 1954; named Composer Laureate of Arkansas in 1975; received the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1988 [13][14][15]
William Schuman Beta Gamma (1930) Former President of the Juilliard School; first president of Lincoln Center; awarded the inaugural Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1943, the National Medal of Arts in 1987, and the Kennedy Center Honors in 1989 [9][16][17]
John Philip Sousa Alpha Xi (1925) Known as the "March King;" composer of over 100 marches, including the national march "The Stars and Stripes Forever"
Jack Stamp Zeta Tau (1973) Inducted into the American Bandmasters Association in 2000; awarded the title of "University Professor" for the 2008-2009 academic year at IUP [18][19]
James Swearingen Iota Omicron (1968) Inducted into the American Bandmasters Association in 2000 [18]
Frank Ticheli Alpha Alpha (2009) Well-decorated composer; recipient of the Arts and Letters Award, Goddard Lieberson Fellowship, and Charles Ives Scholarship, all from the American Academy of Arts and Letters [20]
J. Clifton Williams Beta Omega (1946) First winner of the Sousa/Ostwald Award; known for concert march "The Sinfonians", which incorporates the fraternity song "Hail Sinfonia" [11]
John Philip Sousa c. 1900
Percy Grainger

Choral/vocal[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
William Levi Dawson Alpha Alpha (1977) Arranger of African-American spirituals; recipient of the University of Pennsylvania Glee Club Award of Merit in 1968 [21]
Frank Ferko Kappa Sigma (1969) Recipient of a Holtkamp Award from the American Guild of Organists in 1990
Daniel Pinkham Alpha (1959) Named Composer of the Year by the American Guild of Organists in 1990
Leo Sowerby Rho (1933) First composer to receive the Rome Prize, in 1921; recipient of the 1946 Pulitzer Prize for Music [17][22]
Randall Thompson Rho Tau (1972) Noted for choral compositions Alleluia and Testament of Freedom; first recipient of the University of Pennsylvania Glee Club Award of Merit, in 1964; recipient of Yale University's Sanford Medal [21][23]
Peter Wilhousky Beta Gamma (1949) Arranged "Battle Hymn of the Republic"; wrote English lyrics of "Carol of the Bells"

Film/TV[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Warren Barker Beta Psi (1942) Wrote theme songs for Bewitched, 77 Sunset Strip, That Girl, and the Donny and Marie Osmond Show
John Cacavas Iota (1951) Composer of music for television shows including Hawaii Five-O, Kojak, The Bionic Woman, and Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, and the films Airport 1975 and Airport '77 [24][25]
Bill Conti Beta Omega (1960) Film and television composer, including for Rocky and the James Bond film For Your Eyes Only; won an Academy Award for Best Original Song for The Right Stuff and three Emmy Awards for Outstanding Musical Direction for the 64th, 70th and 75th Academy Award ceremonies [26][27]
Dave Grusin Beta Chi (1953) Composed the theme songs for Maude, Good Times, Baretta, and St. Elsewhere; recipient of the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1991 [15][28]
Nelson S. Riddle, Jr. Gamma Omega (1967) Bandleader, arranger, orchestrator; composed soundtrack of the 1960s Batman television series and 1966 movie
David Rose Gamma Omega (1968) Wrote music for The Red Skelton Show and Bonanza; known for 1962 Billboard #1 hit "The Stripper"; has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame [29][30]
David Rose (3rd from left) in AFRS Radio Show, c. 1946

Post-romantic[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
George W. Chadwick Alpha (1909) Director of the New England Conservatory of Music, 1897–1930; member of "Boston Six"; "Sinfonia" in the fraternity's name is attributed to Chadwick, based on the name of a student organization he was a member of at the Leipzig Conservatory
George W. Chadwick c. 1909

Other[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Samuel Adler Gamma Theta (1960), Alpha Alpha (1966) German-born composer; named Composer of the Year by the American Guild of Organists in 1991
Leroy Anderson Gamma Omega (1969) Composer, noted for "Bugler's Holiday", "Syncopated Clock", and the holiday classic "Sleigh Ride"; has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame [29][31]
Robert Russell Bennett Gamma Omega (1966) First president of the American Society of Music Arrangers and Composers (ASMAC); won an Oscar for the film Oklahoma! [32][33]
Aaron Copland Alpha Upsilon (1961) Recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, Pulitzer Prize in composition for Appalachian Spring, and Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1970; a Kennedy Center honoree in 1979; his well-known compositions include Fanfare for the Common Man and Rodeo [15][16][17]
George Crumb Beta Chi (1961) Received the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1968 for his orchestral work Echoes of Time and the River and a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Composition in 2001 for his work Star-Child [17][34]
Norman Dello Joio Epsilon Nu (1971) Won the Pulitzer Prize for Music for his Meditations on Ecclesiastes in 1957, and an Emmy Award in 1965 for his score to the NBC special The Louvre [17]
Carlisle Floyd Epsilon Iota (1957) Awarded the National Medal of Arts in 2004; named the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music in 2012 [9][15]
Morton Gould Alpha Delta (1947) Awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Music for Stringmusic in 1995, and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005 [17][35]
Ferde Grofé Beta Epsilon (1939) Piano player for Paul Whiteman's orchestra; arranged George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue for both jazz and full orchestras; known for Grand Canyon Suite
Adolphus Hailstork Rho Mu (2010) Composer and educator
Howard Hanson Iota (1916) Director of the Eastman School of Music, 1924–1964; recipient of the 1944 Pulitzer Prize for his Symphony No. 4, Requiem, and the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1954 [15][17]
Victor Herbert Lambda (1913) Tin Pan Alley composer; co-founder and vice-president of ASCAP [36][37]
Alan Hovhaness Delta Omicron (1949) Prolific Armenian-American composer, with over 500 surviving works
Karel Husa Alpha Alpha (1977) Awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his String Quartet No. 3 in 1969; known for Music for Prague 1968 [17]
Gail T. Kubik Alpha Nu (1934) Won the 1952 Pulitzer Prize for Music for Symphony Concertante [17]
Krzysztof Penderecki Epsilon Iota (1975) Received a Grammy Award for Best Choral Performance for Credo in 2001
Vincent Persichetti Delta Eta (1961) Awarded the University of Pennsylvania Glee Club Award of Merit in 1984 [21]
Peter Schickele Gamma Epsilon (1974) Composer and comedian, best known by the pseudonym P.D.Q. Bach [38]
Arnold Schoenberg Alpha Epsilon (1935) Developed the twelve-tone technique of composition [39]
Arnold Schoenberg, Alpha Epsilon Honorary 1935

Conductors[edit]

Band/winds[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Leonard Falcone Gamma Epsilon (1940) Long-time Director of Bands at Michigan State University; scholarship endowments were established in his honor at Michigan State University, Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp, and the Falcone International Tuba and Euphonium Festival
Frederick Fennell Alpha Nu (1934) Widely regarded as the leader of the wind ensemble movement in the US; recipient of the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 2003 [15]
George N. Parks Rho Sigma (1974) Founder of the George N. Parks Drum Major Academy, a summer workshop program for high school drum majors
William Revelli Alpha Lambda (1935) Long-time Director of Bands at the University of Michigan; recipient of the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1994 (awarded posthumously, as he died one month before the National Convention) [15]
Thomas Tyra Iota (1953) Director of Bands at Louisiana State University and Eastern Michigan University; later Dean at Crane School of Music; created the LSU Golden Girls Dance Line and wrote lyrics and music for many university spirit songs, including Northwestern's Alma Mater

Choral[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Charles Bruffy Nu Gamma (1981) Grammy Award-winning director of the Kansas City Chorale and Phoenix Chorale; chorus director of the Kansas City Symphony [40][41]
Norman Luboff Alpha Nu (1963) Founder and Director of the Norman Luboff Choir; has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame [29]
Robert Shaw Alpha Chi (1945) Recipient of 14 Grammy Awards; Kennedy Center honoree in 1991 [16]
John Finley Williamson Alpha Theta (1925) Founder of Westminster Choir; co-founder of Westminster Choir College
Norman Luboff in 1963

Symphonic[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Arthur Fiedler Delta Omicron (1950) Long-time conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra; awarded the University of Pennsylvania Glee Club Award of Merit in 1976, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 [21]
Erich Kunzel Eta-Omicron (1969) Long-time conductor of the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra; awarded the National Medal of Arts in 2006 [9]
James Levine Alpha Alpha (1979) Conducted the Chicago Symphony Orchestra on the soundtrack of Fantasia 2000; Kennedy Center Honoree in 2002; recipient of the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1979 [15][16]
Pierre Monteaux Alpha (1919) Conducted the world premieres of Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring and other prominent works, including Petrushka, Ravel's Daphnis et Chloé, and Debussy's Jeux [42]
Leonard Slatkin Alpha Alpha (1987) Music Director of the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra and National Symphony Orchestra;s Conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra; recipient of the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1997 and the National Medal of Arts in 2003 [9][15]
Michael Tilson Thomas Alpha Epsilon (1963) Long-time Music Director of the San Francisco Symphony; recipient of the National Medal of Arts in 2009, and multiple Grammy Awards [9]

Television[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Mort Lindsey Beta Gamma (1948) Orchestrator, composer, conductor and musical director for Judy Garland, Barbra Streisand and Merv Griffin; won a Grammy Award for Judy Garland at Carnegie Hall and an Emmy Award for Barbra Streisand in Central Park [43]

Educational administrators[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Gilbert Raynolds Combs Beta (1900) Founded the Combs College of Music, originally called the Combs Broad Street Conservatory of Music; second Supreme President of Phi Mu Alpha
Charles Paul Conn Pi Xi (2011) President of Lee University, overseeing significant growth, both in student population and budget [44]
John Dunn Delta Iota (2010) President of Western Michigan University
Diether Haenicke Delta Iota (1993) Former President of Western Michigan University; received an honorary degree from WMU in 1998 [45]
Robert Hemenway Xi (2011) Former Chancellor of the University of Kansas
Charles S. Johnson Zeta Rho (1953) First black president of historically black Fisk University; civil rights advocate
Aubrey K. Lucas Eta Phi (1977) Former President of the University of Southern Mississippi; oversaw major changes in the structure of the university
James Moeser Alpha Iota (1958) Former chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Jay F. W. Pearson Beta Tau (1953) Marine biologist; second president of the University of Miami, 1952–1962
J. Wayne Reitz Eta Omega (1990) Economist; fifth president of the University of Florida, 1955–1967
James M. Simmons Theta Rho (1963) President of Lamar University; a Signature Sinfonian. [46][47]
Graham Spanier Alpha Zeta (1998) Former President of Pennsylvania State University
Charles S. Johnson c.1953

Folk singers[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Burl Ives Alpha Chi (1953) Portrayed Sam the Snowman in the stop-motion special Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer; awarded the University of Pennsylvania Glee Club Award of Merit in 1975 [21]
Burl Ives c.1955

Government leaders[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
David L. Boren Mu (2003) Former Governor of Oklahoma, former US Senator, and current President of the University of Oklahoma
George B. Cortelyou Alpha Alpha (1903) First US Secretary of Commerce and Labor; served as US Postmaster General and US Secretary of the Treasury
Thomas Dewey Epsilon (1920) Former Governor of New York; Republican candidate for President of the United States in 1944 and 1948
Fiorello La Guardia Beta Gamma (1941) Former Congressman from New York; former Mayor of New York
Joshua B. Lee Mu (1917) Former US Senator from Oklahoma
James G. Martin Gamma Kappa (1955) Former US Congressman from North Carolina; former Governor of North Carolina
George B. Cortelyou c.1905-07
Thomas E. Dewey c.1948
Fiorello La Guardia c.1940
James G. Martin c.1988

Instrumentalists[edit]

Miscellaneous[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Pablo Casals Epsilon Iota (1963) Cellist; conductor; recipient of the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963, and the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1973 [15][35]
Philip Farkas Rho Chi (1971) French horn player; wrote several widely used books on horn playing; designed the Holton-Farkas horn
Vic Firth Alpha (1950) Founder of Vic Firth drum stick company
Carlos Montoya Alpha Alpha (1975) Spanish-born Flamenco guitarist; brought the style of playing into the mainstream [48]
Albert Tipton Alpha Chi (1934) Flautist, pianist and conductor; in 1966, Time magazine placed Tipton amongst the "30 first-rate flutists" in the United States and Europe [49]
Statue of Pablo Casals at Montserrat, Spain
Carlos Montoya c.1954

Organists[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
E. Power Biggs Beta Delta (1957) Sparked a renewal of the classical pipe organ during the 1950s; has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame [29]
Joseph Bonnet Alpha (1917) Composer, educator; founded the organ department at the Eastman School of Music
Marcel Dupré Alpha (1924) Composer, educator; known for performing more than 2000 organ recitals throughout Australia, the US, Canada and Europe

Other[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Arna Bontemps Zeta Rho (1954) Poet, member of the Harlem Renaissance

Pianists[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Van Cliburn Alpha Chi (1958) Alpha Alpha (1962) Pianist who achieved worldwide recognition in 1958, when at age 23, he won the first International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow, at the height of the Cold War; awarded the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1962, the Kennedy Center Honors in 2001, the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2003, a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2004, and the National Medal of Arts in 2010 [9][15][16][35]
Rudolph Ganz Zeta (1924) Performer, conductor, composer, and educator
Leopold Godowsky Beta (1900) Performer, composer, educator; advanced piano playing technique
Morton Gould Alpha Delta (1947) Composer, conductor, arranger, and performer; a Kennedy Center honoree in 1994; has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame; awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1995, and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005 [16][29][35]
Josef Hofmann Alpha (1917) Performer, composer, music teacher, and inventor
Peter Nero Gamma Omega (1962) Conductor and Grammy Award-winning pianist
André Previn, KBE Zeta Mu (1967) Pianist, conductor, and composer; winner of multiple Grammy and Academy Awards; appointed an honorary Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1996; a Kennedy Center honoree in 1998; received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2010 [16][35][50]
Sergei Rachmaninoff Alpha (1919) Conductor, composer, and pianist [42]
Roger Williams Alpha Beta (1943) Concert pianist; recorded the only piano instrumental (Autumn Leaves) to reach #1 on Billboard's popular music chart
Rudolph Ganz
Josef Hofmann

Trumpeters[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Maurice Andre Delta (1970) Trumpeter, prolific recording artist
Roger Voisin Alpha (1951) Classical trumpeter; in 1959, The New York Times called him "one of the best-known trumpeters in this country" [51]

Saxophonists[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Sigurd Raschèr Delta (1951) Saxophonist; pioneer of saxophone literature and voicing on the saxophone
Eugene Rousseau Iota Gamma (2006) Saxophonist; co-founder of the World Saxophone Congress

Violinists[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Mischa Elman Alpha (1917) Ukrainian-born violinist famed for his passionate style and beautiful tone
Jascha Heifetz Alpha (1917) Listed by Time magazine as one of the most influential violinists of the twentieth century; awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award (posthumously) in 1989; has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame [29][35][52]
Eugène Ysaÿe Alpha (1917) Performer, composer, educator, conductor; known as "king of the violin"
Efrem Zimbalist Alpha (1917) Performer, composer, educator, and conductor
Mischa Elman
Eugène Ysaÿe

Jazz artists[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Julian "Cannonball" Adderley Gamma Theta (1960) Xi Omega (1970) Saxophonist and bandleader
Jamey Aebersold Gamma Omega (1976) Saxophonist and music educator; known for his jazz improvisation education
Count Basie Mu Nu (1970) Pianist, bandleader; 1981 Kennedy Center honoree; has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame; Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award recipient [16][29][35]
Alvin Batiste Mu Psi (1973) Avant-garde clarinetist
Alan Baylock Nu Psi (2016) Composer, arranger, educator, bandleader, clinician, instrumentalist and bandleader
Louie Bellson Xi Omega (1994) Drummer; invened the double bass drum at age 15
Henry Butler Mu Psi (1969) Blind pianist
Bill Cunliffe Omicron Pi (2010) Grammy Award-winning pianist and composer
Duke Ellington Rho Upsilon (1969) Gamma Delta (1969) Alpha Alpha Pianist and bandleader; has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame; recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1969, and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1966 [29][35]
Bill Evans Delta Omega (1949) Pianist and composer; posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1994 [35]
Maynard Ferguson Xi Chi (1976) Trumpeter and bandleader; recipient of the 2006 Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award [15]
Donald Harrison Jr. Mu Psi (1979) Saxophonist and orchestral composer
Stan Kenton Gamma Epsilon (1961) Pianist, composer, arranger, and bandleader
Tom "Bones" Malone Gamma Theta (2001) Member of The Blues Brothers band; member of the CBS Orchestra, the house band for the Late Show with David Letterman; former arranger for Saturday Night Live
Chuck Mangione Alpha Nu (1971) Flugelhornist and bandleader
Shelly Manne Omicron Pi (1969) Drummer, frequently associated with West Coast jazz
Branford Marsalis Mu Psi (1979) Saxophonist; former bandleader of the Tonight Show Band on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno
Ellis Marsalis, Jr. Epsilon Lambda (1965) Louisiana Music Hall of Fame jazz pianist and music educator; father of Branford and Wynton Marsalis; recipient of the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 2015 [53]
Mike Metheny Upsilon Phi (1974) Flugelhornist and music journalist
Doc Severinsen Eta Lambda (1965) Trumpeter; former bandleader of the NBC Orchestra (later the Tonight Show Band) on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson
Clark Terry Beta Zeta (1968) Trumpeter; recipient of the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1985 and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2010 [15][35]
George Wein Delta Omicron (1954) Jazz promoter and producer; founder of the Newport Jazz Festival
Kirk Whalum Kappa Delta (1978) Saxophonist and songwriter; won a Grammy Award in 2011 for Best Gospel Song
Duke Ellington c. 1965
Count Basie c. 1955
Clark Terry performs with the Great Lakes Navy Band Jazz Ensemble, 2002

Music critics and editors[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Richard Aldrich Alpha (1917) Music critic for The New York Times
Olin Downes Alpha (1917) Music critic for The Boston Post and The New York Times; host of the Metropolitan Opera Quiz
Henry Finck Alpha (1917) Music Editor for the New York Evening Post
Paul Hume Alpha Alpha (1971) Musicologist; Music Editor for The Washington Post; awarded the University of Pennsylvania Glee Club Award of Merit in 1979 [21]
James Gibbons Huneker Alpha (1917) Music writer; music critic for The New York Sun
Henry Edward Krehbiel Alpha (1917) Musicologist; Music Editor for the New-York Tribune
James Huneker c. 1890

Music educators[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Frank Damrosch Alpha (1917) Founder of the Juilliard School in 1905 [54]
William P. Foster Beta Gamma (1953) Omicron Gamma Revolutionised the marching band at Florida A&M University, calling them the "Marching 100" [55]
Edwin Gordon Alpha Kappa (1955) Music educator; developer of the Gordon Music Learning Theory
John Wesley Work III Zeta Rho (1953) Composer, educator, choral director, and scholar of African American folklore and music
Frank Heino Damrosch

Musicologists[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Percy Goetschius Alpha (1917) Advanced composition theory, including the development of the theory of harmonic progression
Sigmund Spaeth Iota (1910) Composer and musicologist; traced the sources and origins of popular songs to their folk and classical roots; recipient of the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1958 [15]

Peace activists[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Thomas W. Fox Gamma Psi (1971) Kidnapped in November 2005 in Baghdad, leading to the Christian Peacemaker hostage crisis; was found dead in 2006

Radio, film and television personalities[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Alan Bergman Alpha Rho (1943) With his wife, became the first songwriters to have written three of the five tunes nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song - "How Do You Keep the Music Playing?" from Best Friends, "It Might Be You" from Tootsie (with Dave Grusin), and "If We Were in Love" from Yes, Giorgio (with John Williams). "Up Where We Belong" from An Officer and a Gentleman won the award that year. They also wrote the popular theme song "And Then There's Maude" for the hit Norman Lear television series Maude.

Bergman was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1980 and in 1995 he was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Berklee College of Music. He is a member of the board of Barbra Streisand's charitable foundation.

Frank De Vol Gamma Omega (1962) Arranger, composer and actor; recognized for his theme tunes for television shows Family Affair, The Brady Bunch, and My Three Sons; acted in several TV series, includingI Dream of Jeannie, Bonanza, and The Brady Bunch
Woody Durham Alpha Rho (1961) Longtime radio announcer for UNC basketball and football, known as the "Voice of the Tar Heels" [56]
Nelson Eddy Zeta (1936) Actor and singer who starred in 19 musical films during the 1930s-40s; has three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame [29]
Art Gilmore Chi (1934) Announcer and narrator for several television and radio programs, including Amos 'n' Andy, The Red Skelton Show, and The World Tomorrow
Andy Griffith Alpha Rho (1946) Actor and singer best known for his lead roles in The Andy Griffith Show and Matlock; has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame; received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005 [29]
Wayne Messmer Alpha Lambda (1970) Professional speaker, singer, radio broadcaster, author and actor; longtime announcer for the Chicago Cubs; well-known for singing "The Star Spangled Banner" for various Chicago sports teams; named as a Signature Sinfonian in 2010 [47]
Mitch Miller Alpha Nu (1929) Host of the 1960s community-sing television program Sing Along With Mitch; awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000 [35]
Fred Rogers Xi Psi (1987) Creator and host of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood; has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame; awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2002 [29]
J.K. Simmons Delta Theta (1975) Actor known for Whiplash, Spider-Man, and The Legend of Korra; won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor at the 87th Academy Awards [57]
Fred Waring Alpha Zeta (1956) Bandleader; host of The Fred Waring Show; has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame; awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 1983 [29]
Andy Griffith c. 2005
Mitch Miller c. 1961

Rock and/or pop musicians[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Joe Bouchard Delta (1967) Former bass player for Blue Öyster Cult
Bo Diddley Eta Omega (1999) Rock and roll pioneer; member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1998 [58]
Ben Folds Beta Tau (2015) Singer and songwriter; frontman of the Ben Folds Five [59]
Glenn Hughes Kappa Pi (1969) The original "biker" character in the disco group Village People
Lee Loughnane Kappa Phi (1965) Founding member of the rock band Chicago; named as a Signature Sinfonian in 2009 [60]
James Pankow Kappa Phi (1966) Founding member of Chicago; named as a Signature Sinfonian in 2009 [60]
Walter Parazaider Kappa Phi (1964) Founding member of Chicago; named as a Signature Sinfonian in 2009 [60]
Ruben Studdard Omicron Delta (1997) Pop singer, winner of the second season of American Idol
Jimmy Webb Pi Tau (1969) Singer and songwriter; known for the songs "Up, Up and Away" and "By the Time I Get to Phoenix"; recipient of multiple Grammy Awards
Bo Diddley c. 1997

Scientists and scholars[edit]

Visual artists[edit]

Vocalists[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Pasquale Amato Beta Omega (1939) Operatic baritone who sang with the Metropolitan Opera in New York City from 1908-1921
David Bispham Epsilon (1905) First American–born operatic baritone to gain international notability
Enrico Caruso Alpha (1917) Pioneer of recorded music; posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1987 [35]
Craig Colclough Delta Pi (2001) American bass-baritone employed with groups such as the Los Angeles Opera.
François Clemmons Alpha Omega (1968) Founder of the Harlem Spiritual Ensemble; frequent guest (as Officer Clemmons) on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood
Jerry Hadley Delta Nu (1971) Grammy Award-winning operatic tenor
Sherrill Milnes Alpha Beta (1954) Operatic baritone known for his Verdi roles; recipient of the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1982 [15]
Luciano Pavarotti Beta Tau (1978) Operatic tenor; humanitarian; known for bridging the gap between popular and classical music; Kennedy Center honoree in 2001 [16]
Titta Ruffo Alpha (1917) Operatic baritone and prolific recording artist
Antonio Scotti Alpha (1917) Principal baritone at the Metropolitan Opera
Jacques Urlus Alpha (1917) Dramatic tenor famed for his recordings of the music of Richard Wagner
William Warfield Delta Lambda (1961) Concert bass-baritone singer and actor; recipient of the Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award in 1976 [15]
Baritone David Bispham c. 1920
Enrico Caruso c. 1910

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Buddy Morrow dies at 91; trombonist". Los Angeles Times. October 4, 2010. Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  2. ^ "Paul Whiteman". PBS.org. PBS. Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  3. ^ Edge, Laura B. (2004). Andrew Carnegie. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. p. 84. ISBN 0822549654. Retrieved 26 June 2014.
  4. ^ "Almanac: The birth of Kodak". Sunday Morning. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 30 June 2014.
  5. ^ Brayer, Elizabeth (2006). George Eastman : a biography (Reprint ed.). Rochester, NY: Univ. of Rochester Press. p. 443. ISBN 1580462472. Retrieved 30 June 2014.
  6. ^ "Henry Clay Frick (1849-1919)". The Frick Pittsburg. Frick Art & Historical Center. Archived from the original on 6 May 2014. Retrieved 2 July 2014.
  7. ^ "Brief Biographical / Historical Sketch". University Library System. University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved 2 July 2014.
  8. ^ "Boston Symphony Orchestra". United States History. Online Highways LLC. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g "Lifetime Honors: National Medal of Arts". National Endowment for the Arts. Archived from the original on 2013-08-26. Retrieved 2012-10-31.
  10. ^ Barron, James (September 18, 2008). "Henry Z. Steinway, Piano Maker, Dies at 93". The New York Times. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  11. ^ a b c "ABA Awards". The American Bandmasters Association. Archived from the original on 5 July 2017. Retrieved 4 August 2014.
  12. ^ "David Maslanka". Pytheas Center for Contemporary Music. Retrieved 4 August 2014.
  13. ^ "Dr. Francis McBeth". Hardin-Simmons University. Retrieved 5 August 2014.
  14. ^ "William Francis McBeth". The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture. The Central Arkansas Library System.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Charles E. Lutton Man of Music Award. Guide to Awards Pg. 11 "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-05-27. Retrieved 2011-02-16. Evansville, IN: Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity, 2012. Retrieved 2014-06-27.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i "List of Kennedy Center Honorees". The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Archived from the original on 2013-11-15. Retrieved 2012-10-31.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Music". The Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  18. ^ a b "Lest We Forget - Membership History 2012" (PDF). The American Bandmasters Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 September 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  19. ^ "Music Department's Jack Stamp Selected as University Professor". Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  20. ^ "Awards List". American Academy of Arts and Letters. Archived from the original on 19 December 2015. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  21. ^ a b c d e f "The University of Pennsylvania Glee Club Award of Merit". The University of Pennsylvania Glee Club. Retrieved 2012-10-31.
  22. ^ "Society of Fellows Member Directory". American Academy in Rome. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  23. ^ "Randall Thompson". Temple Emanu-El. Congregation Emanu-El of the City of New York. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  24. ^ Bahr, Jeff. "Composer John Cacavas dies at 83". Aberdeen News. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  25. ^ "John Cacavas". IMDB. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  26. ^ "The 56th Academy Awards (1984) Nominees and Winners". Oscars.org. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on 1 October 2014. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  27. ^ "Awards Search". Emmys. Academy Of Television Arts & Sciences. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  28. ^ "Dave Grusin". IMDB. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Hollywood Walk of Fame - Browse Stars". Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2012-11-07.
  30. ^ "Composer, Conductor David Rose Dies". The Pittsburgh Press. 25 August 1990. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  31. ^ "PBS – Leroy Anderson biographical material". PBS. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  32. ^ "About". ASMAC. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  33. ^ "The 28th Academy Awards (1956) Nominees and Winners". Oscars.org. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  34. ^ "2000 Grammy Award Winners". Grammy.com. Retrieved 4 December 2015.
  35. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award Recipients". The Recording Academy. Retrieved 2012-11-02.
  36. ^ Allen, Erin (24 July 2012). "The Musical Worlds of Victor Herbert to Open Aug. 16". Library of Congress. Retrieved 3 December 2015.
  37. ^ "The Library of Congress to Recognize ASCAP Founder Victor Herbert with New Exhibit". ASCAP. 25 July 2012. Retrieved 3 December 2015.
  38. ^ Oestreich, James R (16 December 2015). "Peter Schickele Brings P.D.Q. Bach Back to the Stage". The New York Times. Retrieved 30 December 2015.
  39. ^ Tommasini, Anthony (14 October 2007). "Unraveling the Knots of the 12 Tones". The New York Times. Retrieved 30 December 2015.
  40. ^ "Naxos 2009 Grammy Awards and Nominations". Naxos. Retrieved 21 December 2014.
  41. ^ "Kansas City Chorale". The Kansas City Chorale. Retrieved 21 December 2014.
  42. ^ a b Themes for Brotherhood (2012 ed.). Evansville, IN: Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity.
  43. ^ "BBC News - Composer Mort Lindsey dies at the age of 89". Bbc.co.uk. 8 May 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-14.
  44. ^ "Lee University - Meet the President". Lee University. 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-15.
  45. ^ "WMU News - WMU awards Tim Allen honorary degree". Western Michigan University. 1998-06-27. Retrieved 2012-10-15.
  46. ^ "Lamar University president honored by music fraternity for musical, career excellence". BeaumontEnterprise.com. 19 February 2011. Retrieved 2012-10-16.
  47. ^ a b "2010 Signature Sinfonian Inductees". Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Inc. Retrieved 2012-12-23.
  48. ^ Summers, Kim. "Carlos Montoya - Music Biography, Credits and Discography". allmusic by Rovi. Rovi Corp. Retrieved 2012-10-26.
  49. ^ "Instruments: Flute Fever". Time. 11 March 1966. Retrieved 2010-12-12.
  50. ^ Chris Jones (9 August 2002). "André Previn: Striking the right chord". BBC News: Newsmakers. Retrieved 2012-11-07.
  51. ^ Salzman, Eric (1 February 1959). "Records: Trumpet - Voisin Is the Soloist In Varied Selection". The New York Times. p. X17.
  52. ^ "The Best Violinists." Time. 2 February 1962.
  53. ^ "Sinfonia Names 24th Man of Music". sinfonia.org. Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. Retrieved 5 June 2015.
  54. ^ "Juilliard - A Brief History". The Juilliard School. Retrieved 2012-11-04.
  55. ^ Goldstein, Richard (29 August 2010). "William P. Foster, Pioneer of Florida A&M's Marching 100, Dies at 91". The New York Times. Retrieved 2012-11-04.
  56. ^ "Chapter History". Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Alpha Rho, University of North Carolina. n.d. Retrieved March 18, 2017.
  57. ^ "The 87th Academy Awards: 2015". oscars.org. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 25 February 2015.
  58. ^ "Bo Diddley Biography". Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2012-11-24.
  59. ^ "Ben Folds – Honorary Initiation". Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. November 13, 2015. Retrieved 2016-09-05.
  60. ^ a b c "2009 Signature Sinfonian Inductees". Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Inc. Retrieved 2012-11-24.
  61. ^ http://www.fit.edu/faculty/profiles/profile.php?value=487