List of Star Wars films and television series

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The Star Wars film series is divided into multiple sets of films, beginning with a "trilogy of trilogies". They were released out of sequence: the original (1977–83, Episodes IV–VI), prequel (1999–2005, Episodes I–III), and sequel (2015–19, Episodes VII–IX) trilogy. The first two trilogies were released on three year intervals, the sequel trilogy films two years apart. Each trilogy centers on a generation of the Skywalker family, which is strong with the Force. The prequels focus on Anakin Skywalker, the original trilogy on his son Luke, and the sequel trilogy includes Kylo Ren, the son of Anakin's daughter Leia and Han Solo. The main series has also been called the "Skywalker saga" due to its focus on the family.[1]

The anthology series of films, began during the production of the sequel trilogy, is set between the main episodes, showing the backstory or origins of main characters. Two additional series of Star Wars films have also been announced to be in development, an untitled trilogy by Episode VIII's director Rian Johnson, with an additional untitled film series by creators David Benioff and D. B. Weiss (both are known for creating the unrelated Game of Thrones television series).

An animated film was also created in 2008, titled The Clone Wars. It serves as a companion piece and pilot to an animated series of the same title, it was followed by Rebels, Forces of Destiny, and Resistance, whom also take place in the same continuity as the films, along an upcoming live-action series. Other television projects were produced before those, but are not considered canonical to the films.

Various videogames, and print works, such as comics and novels, also tell stories in the same continuity as the films and television series.

Theatrical feature films[edit]

Main series[edit]

Film Release date Director Screenwriter(s) Story by Producer(s) Composer Initial distributor
Original trilogy
06Episode IV –
A New Hope
01May 25, 1977 (1977-05-25) George Lucas Gary Kurtz John Williams 20th Century Fox
07Episode V –
The Empire Strikes Back
02May 21, 1980 (1980-05-21) Irvin Kershner Leigh Brackett and Lawrence Kasdan George Lucas
08Episode VI –
Return of the Jedi
03May 25, 1983 (1983-05-25) Richard Marquand Lawrence Kasdan and George Lucas Howard Kazanjian
Prequel trilogy
02Episode I –
The Phantom Menace
04May 19, 1999 (1999-05-19) George Lucas Rick McCallum John Williams 20th Century Fox
03Episode II –
Attack of the Clones
05May 16, 2002 (2002-05-16) George Lucas George Lucas and Jonathan Hales George Lucas
04Episode III –
Revenge of the Sith
06May 19, 2005 (2005-05-19) George Lucas
Sequel trilogy
10Episode VII –
The Force Awakens
07December 18, 2015 (2015-12-18) J. J. Abrams Lawrence Kasdan & J. J. Abrams and Michael Arndt Kathleen Kennedy, J. J. Abrams and Bryan Burk John Williams Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures
11Episode VIII –
The Last Jedi
08December 15, 2017 (2017-12-15) Rian Johnson Kathleen Kennedy and Ram Bergman
12Episode IX 09December 20, 2019 (2019-12-20) J. J. Abrams J. J. Abrams & Chris Terrio[2][3] Kathleen Kennedy, J. J. Abrams
and Michelle Rejwan

A Star Wars story anthology films[edit]

Film Release date Director Screenwriter(s) Story by Producer(s) Composer Initial distributor
02Rogue One:
A Star Wars Story
01December 16, 2016 (2016-12-16) Gareth Edwards Chris Weitz and Tony Gilroy John Knoll and Gary Whitta Kathleen Kennedy, Allison Shearmur and Simon Emanuel Michael Giacchino Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures
01Solo:
A Star Wars Story
02May 25, 2018 (2018-05-25) Ron Howard Jon Kasdan & Lawrence Kasdan John Powell
John Williams
03Untitled third
anthology film
032020[4] James Mangold James Mangold & Simon Kinberg Simon Kinberg TBA

Animated features[edit]

Film Release date Director Screenwriter(s) Story by Producer(s) Composer Initial distributor
Star Wars:
The Clone Wars
August 15, 2008 (2008-08-15) Dave Filoni Henry Gilroy & Steven Melching & Scott Murphy George Lucas and Catherine Winder Kevin Kiner Warner Bros. Pictures

Future[edit]

Additionally, in November 2017, Lucasfilm announced that Rian Johnson is writing and directing the first film of a new trilogy. It will differ from the Skywalker-focused films in favor of focusing on new characters.[5]

In February 2018, it was announced that Game of Thrones creators David Benioff and D. B. Weiss would write and produce a series of Star Wars films separate from the Skywalker story.[6]

Cast[edit]

Technical information[edit]

The first six films of the Star Wars series were shot in an aspect ratio of 2.35:1, while the Disney-made films are shot in 2.40:1. The original and sequel trilogies were shot with anamorphic lenses. Episodes IV, V, and VII were shot in Panavision, while Episode VI was shot in Joe Dunton Camera (JDC) scope. Episode I was shot with Hawk anamorphic lenses on Arriflex cameras, and Episodes II and III were shot with Sony's CineAlta high-definition digital cameras.[7]

Music and sound effects[edit]

Lucas hired Ben Burtt to oversee the sound effects on the original 1977 film. Burtt's accomplishment was such that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented him with a Special Achievement Award because it had no award at the time for the work he had done.[8] Lucasfilm developed the THX sound reproduction standard for Return of the Jedi.[9] John Williams composed the scores for all eight films. Lucas's design for Star Wars involved a grand musical sound, with leitmotifs for different characters and important concepts. Williams's Star Wars title theme has become one of the most famous and well-known musical compositions in modern music history.[10]

Stunts[edit]

Lucas hired 'the Dean of Special Effects' John Stears, who created R2-D2, Luke Skywalker's Landspeeder, the Jedi Knights' lightsabers, and the Death Star.[11][12] The technical lightsaber choreography for the original trilogy was developed by leading filmmaking sword-master Bob Anderson. Anderson trained actor Mark Hamill (Luke Skywalker) and performed all the sword stunts as Darth Vader during the lightsaber duels in The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, wearing Vader's costume. Anderson's role in the original Star Wars trilogy was highlighted in the film Reclaiming the Blade, where he shares his experiences as the fight choreographer developing the lightsaber techniques for the movies.[13]

Re-releases[edit]

Box office performance[edit]

Film Release date Budget Box office revenue Box office ranking Refs.
North America Adjusted for
inflation
(North America)[a]
Other
territories
Worldwide All-time
North America
All-time
worldwide
Star Wars May 25, 1977 $11
million
$460,998,007 $1,359,782,041 $314,400,000 $775,398,007 #15 #83 [15]
The Empire Strikes Back May 21, 1980 $18
million
$290,475,067 $776,875,106 $247,900,000 $538,375,067 #88 #174 [16][17]
Return of the Jedi May 25, 1983 $32.5
million
$309,306,177 $748,807,361 $165,800,000 $475,106,177 #72 #206 [18]
Original trilogy total $61.5
million
$1,060,779,251 $2,885,464,508 $728,100,000 $1,788,879,251
The Phantom Menace May 19, 1999 $115
million
$474,544,677 $722,955,556 $552,500,000 $1,027,044,677 #14 #32 [19]
Attack of the Clones May 16, 2002 $115
million
$310,676,740 $429,035,543 $338,721,588 $649,398,328 #70 #122 [20]
Revenge of the Sith May 19, 2005 $113
million
$380,270,577 $476,488,298 $468,484,191 $848,754,768 #37 #66 [21]
Prequel trilogy total $343
million
$1,165,491,994 $1,628,479,397 $1,359,705,779 $2,525,197,773
The Force Awakens December 18, 2015 $245
million
$936,662,225 $955,104,548 $1,131,561,399 $2,068,223,624 #1 #3 [22]
The Last Jedi December 15, 2017 $200
million
$620,181,382 $620,164,565 $712,358,507 $1,332,539,889 #8 #11 [23]
Sequel trilogy total $445
million
$1,556,843,607 $1,551,110,706 $1,843,919,906 $3,400,763,513
Rogue One December 16, 2016 $200
million
$532,177,324 $532,091,909 $523,879,949 $1,056,057,273 #11 #27 [24]
Solo May 25, 2018 $250
million
$213,304,279 $212,395,307 $178,712,535 $392,016,814 #173 #277 [25]
Anthology films total $450
million
$745,481,603 $754,963,790 $702,592,484 $1,448,074,087
The Clone Wars August 15, 2008 $8.5
million
$35,161,554 $35,679,744 $33,121,290 $68,282,844 #2,313 [26]
All films total $1.308
billion
$4,563,758,009 $6,855,698,145 $4,667,439,459 $9,231,197,468 #2 #3

Star Wars is the second highest grossing film series of all time, behind the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Albeit it should be noted that the Star Wars film series is composed of fewer films than the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Critical and public response[edit]

Film Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic CinemaScore
Star Wars 93% (113 reviews)[27] 90 (24 reviews)[28]
The Empire Strikes Back 95% (91 reviews)[29] 82 (25 reviews)[30]
Return of the Jedi 80% (87 reviews)[31] 58 (24 reviews)[32]
Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace 55% (217 reviews)[33] 51 (36 reviews)[34] A−[35]
Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones 66% (245 reviews)[36] 54 (39 reviews)[37] A−[35]
Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith 79% (288 reviews)[38] 68 (40 reviews)[39] A−[35]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 18% (169 reviews)[40] 35 (30 reviews)[41] B−[35]
Star Wars: The Force Awakens 93% (386 reviews)[42] 81 (55 reviews)[43] A[35]
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 85% (382 reviews)[44] 65 (51 reviews)[45] A[35]
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 91% (379 reviews)[46] 85 (56 reviews)[47] A[35]
Solo: A Star Wars Story 71% (357 reviews)[48] 62 (54 reviews)[49] A–[35]
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Academy Awards[edit]

The nine live-action films together have been nominated for 36 Academy Awards, of which they won seven. The films were also awarded a total of three Special Achievement Awards. Star Wars received seven awards and four nominations,[50] The Empire Strikes Back received one award, one Special Achievement Award and two nominations,[51] Return of the Jedi received one Special Achievement Award and four nominations,[52] The Phantom Menace received three nominations,[53] Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith received one nomination each,[54][55] The Force Awakens received five nominations,[56] Rogue One received two nominations[57] and The Last Jedi received four nominations.[58]

Five films in the franchise (Return of the Jedi,[52] The Phantom Menace,[53] The Force Awakens,[56] Rogue One[57] and The Last Jedi[58]) were nominated for Best Sound Mixing; two films (Star Wars[50] and The Empire Strikes Back[51]) won the award. Five films (The Phantom Menace,[53] Attack of the Clones,[54] The Force Awakens,[56] Rogue One[57] and The Last Jedi[58]) were nominated for Best Visual Effects; Star Wars[50] won the award, while The Empire Strikes Back[51] and Return of the Jedi[52] received Special Achievement Awards for their visual effects and Star Wars[50] received a Special Achievement Award for its alien, creature and robot voices. Four films (The Empire Strikes Back,[51] Return of the Jedi,[52] The Force Awakens[56] and The Last Jedi[58]) were nominated for Best Original Score; Star Wars[50] won the award. The Force Awakens[56] was nominated for Best Film Editing and Star Wars[50] won the award. The Empire Strikes Back[51] and Return of the Jedi[52] were nominated for Best Art Direction-Set Decoration and Star Wars[50] won the award. Four films (Return of the Jedi,[52] The Phantom Menace,[53] The Force Awakens[56] and The Last Jedi[58]) were nominated for Best Sound Editing. Star Wars[50] won Best Costume Design and it also received nominations for Best Supporting Actor (Alec Guinness), Best Director (George Lucas), Best Picture and Best Original Screenplay. Revenge of the Sith[55] received a nomination for Best Makeup.

National Film Registry[edit]

In 1989, the Library of Congress selected the original Star Wars film for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry, as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."[59] Its sequel, The Empire Strikes Back, was selected in 2010.[60][61] Despite these callings for archival, it is unclear whether copies of the 1977 and 1980 theatrical sequences of Star Wars and Empire—or copies of the 1997 Special Edition versions—have been archived by the NFR, or indeed if any copy has been provided by Lucasfilm and accepted by the Registry.[62][63]

Television and internet[edit]

Animated series[edit]

Title Seasons Episodes Release year Supervising Director Production company Network Setting Canon
Droids 1 13 1985–86 N/A Nelvana ABC Between Revenge of the Sith and A New Hope No
Ewoks 2 35 1985–86 Before Return of the Jedi
Clone Wars 3 25 2003–05 Genndy Tartakovsky Cartoon Network Studios Cartoon Network Between Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith
The Clone Wars 6 121 2008–2014; 2019 Dave Filoni Lucasfilm Animation Cartoon Network (Season 1–5)
Netflix (Season 6)
Disney streaming service (Season 7)
Yes
Rebels 4 75 2014–18 Dave Filoni (Season 1-2)
Justin Ridge (Season 3-4)
Disney XD Between Revenge of the Sith and A New Hope
Forces of Destiny 2 32 2017– Dave Filoni YouTube Across all eras
Resistance 1 N/A 2018 Disney XD Between Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens

Critical and public response[edit]

Film Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic CinemaScore
The Clone Wars 95% [64]
Star Wars Rebels 100% [65]
Resistance
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  • No critical consensus has been reached for either film.

Television films and specials[edit]

Film Release date Director(s) Screen writer(s) Network Setting Canon
Holiday Special
Holiday Special November 17, 1978 David Acomba and Steve Binder Bruce Vilanch CBS Between A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back No
Ewok television films
Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure November 25, 1984 John Korty Bob Carrau
Story by: George Lucas
ABC Between A New Hope and Return of the Jedi No
Ewoks: The Battle for Endor November 24, 1985 Jim Wheat and Ken Wheat Jim Wheat and Ken Wheat
Story by: George Lucas

Critical and public response[edit]

Film Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic CinemaScore
Holiday Special 43% (7 reviews)[66]
Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure 25% (12 reviews)[67]
Ewoks: The Battle for Endor
List indicator(s)
  • A dark grey cell indicates the information is not available for the film.
  • No critical consensus has been reached for either film.

Parodies[edit]

Lucasfilm Star Wars parodies[edit]

The following parodies were directly produced by Lucasfilm.

Title Release year Notes
Mockumentaries
Return of the Ewok 1982 24-minute fictional mockumentary-style movie, focusing on the decision of Warwick Davis to become an actor and act as Wicket the Ewok in Return of the Jedi.[68]
R2-D2: Beneath the Dome 2002 20-minute mockumentary-style movie, focusing on the "true" story of R2-D2's life. It was made as a fun side-project by some of the crew of Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones, but was later released for television and its own DVD.[69]
Animated series
Star Wars Detours N/A Produced between 2012 and 2013, this animated animated Star Wars parody series from the creators of Robot Chicken was never released. Star Wars Detours was produced prior to the Disney acquisition,[70] but its release was postponed in 2013 and it ultimately never aired,[71] despite 39 episodes having been completed and 62 additional scripts finished.[72]

Lego Star Wars[edit]

To promote its sets, Lego has created multiple short films, television specials, and animated series that parody the Star Wars saga. Lego versions of Han Solo, Chewbacca, C-3PO, and Lando cameo aboard the Millennium Falcon in The Lego Movie.[73]

Short films[edit]

Title Release date Notes
Lego Star Wars: Revenge of the Brick 2005 Short film based on Revenge of the Sith
Lego Star Wars: The Quest for R2-D2 2009 Short film based on Star Wars: The Clone Wars
Lego Star Wars: Bombad Bounty 2010 Short film that follows up The Quest for R2-D2

Television specials[edit]

Title Release year Notes
Lego Star Wars: The Padawan Menace 2011 Half hour TV special
Lego Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Out 2012 Half hour TV special

Animated series[edit]

Title Release year Episodes Notes
Lego Star Wars: The Yoda Chronicles 2013–14 7 Comic television series also known as Star Wars: The New Yoda Chronicles.
Lego Star Wars: Droid Tales 2015 5 Comic television series retelling Episodes I-VI and Star Wars Rebels episode "Droids in Distress".
Lego Star Wars: The Freemaker Adventures 2016–present 26 Comic television series set between Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi.

Other licensed Star Wars parodies[edit]

Parody Star Wars themed TV specials[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Adjusting for inflation is complicated by the fact that the first four films have had multiple releases in different years, so their earnings cannot be simply adjusted by the initial year of release. Inflation adjusted figures for 2005 can be found in Block, Alex Ben; Wilson, Lucy Autrey, eds. (2010). George Lucas's Blockbusting: A Decade-By-Decade Survey of Timeless Movies Including Untold Secrets of Their Financial and Cultural Success. HarperCollins. p. 519. ISBN 978-0061778896.  Adjustment to constant dollars is undertaken in conjunction with the United States Consumer Price Index provided by the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, using 2005 as the base year.[14]

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