List of androgen esters

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Testosterone, the base androgen of most androgen esters.

This is a list of androgen esters, including esters (as well as ethers) of natural androgens like testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and synthetic anabolic–androgenic steroids (AAS) like nandrolone (19-nortestosterone).

Esters of natural AAS[edit]

Testosterone esters[edit]

Marketed[edit]

Many esters of testosterone have been marketed, including the following major esters:[1][2]

And the following less commonly used esters:[1][2]

Mixtures of testosterone esters that are marketed include Deposterona, Omnadren, Sustanon, and Testoviron Depot (see above for individual components).[3]

Never marketed[edit]

The following major testosterone ester has not been marketed:[1][2]

  • Testosterone buciclate (20 Aet-1, CDB-1781) – a very long-acting testosterone ester that was under development but ultimately did not reach the market[4][5]

And the following less commonly known testosterone esters have also not been marketed:[1][2]

Dihydrotestosterone esters[edit]

Marketed[edit]

Several esters of dihydrotestosterone (DHT; androstanolone, stanolone) have also been marketed, including the following:[8][9]

Never marketed[edit]

The following esters of DHT have not been marketed:[8][9]

Testifenon (chlorphenacyl DHT ester) is a nitrogen mustard ester of DHT that was developed as an alkylating antineoplastic agent but was never marketed.[10]

Esters of other natural AAS[edit]

Marketed[edit]

The following esters of other natural AAS have been marketed:

Never marketed[edit]

And the following have not been marketed:

Sturamustine is a nitrosourea ester of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) that was developed as an alkylating antineoplastic agent but was never marketed.[11][12]

Ethers of natural AAS[edit]

Marketed[edit]

Although not esters, the following ethers of natural AAS have been marketed as well:

Never marketed[edit]

And the following have not been marketed:

Esters of synthetic AAS[edit]

Nandrolone esters[edit]

Marketed[edit]

Many esters of the synthetic AAS nandrolone (19-nortestosterone) have been marketed, including the following major esters:[13][14][15]

And the following less commonly used esters:[13][14][15]

Never marketed[edit]

The following nandrolone esters exist but were never marketed:

LS-1727 is a nitrosocarbamate ester of nandrolone that was developed as an alkylating antineoplastic agent but was never marketed.[16]

Trenbolone esters[edit]

Marketed[edit]

A few esters of the synthetic AAS trenbolonehave been marketed, including the following esters:

Never marketed[edit]

The following trenbolone esters exist but were never marketed:

Esters of other synthetic AAS[edit]

Marketed[edit]

Many esters of other synthetic AAS have been marketed as well, including the following:

Never marketed[edit]

Whereas the following have not been marketed:

Ethers of synthetic AAS[edit]

Marketed[edit]

Although not esters, the following ethers of synthetic AAS have been marketed as well:

Never marketed[edit]

And the following have not been marketed:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Index Nominum 2000: International Drug Directory. Taylor & Francis US. 2000. ISBN 978-3-88763-075-1. Retrieved 29 May 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g J. Elks (14 November 2014). The Dictionary of Drugs: Chemical Data: Chemical Data, Structures and Bibliographies. Springer. pp. 642–. ISBN 978-1-4757-2085-3. 
  3. ^ a b William Llewellyn (2011). Anabolics. Molecular Nutrition Llc. pp. 437–. ISBN 978-0-9828280-1-4. 
  4. ^ E. Nieschlag; H. M. Behre (1 April 2004). Testosterone: Action, Deficiency, Substitution. Cambridge University Press. pp. 692–. ISBN 978-1-139-45221-2. 
  5. ^ Shalender Bhasin (13 February 1996). Pharmacology, Biology, and Clinical Applications of Androgens: Current Status and Future Prospects. John Wiley & Sons. pp. 471–. ISBN 978-0-471-13320-9. 
  6. ^ http://www.evestra.com/index-Dateien/Page1242.htm
  7. ^ Ahmed G, Elger W, Meece F, Nair HB, Schneider B, Wyrwa R, Nickisch K (October 2017). "A prodrug design for improved oral absorption and reduced hepatic interaction". Bioorg. Med. Chem. 25 (20): 5569–5575. doi:10.1016/j.bmc.2017.08.027. PMID 28886996. 
  8. ^ a b J. Elks (14 November 2014). The Dictionary of Drugs: Chemical Data: Chemical Data, Structures and Bibliographies. Springer. pp. 640–. ISBN 978-1-4757-2085-3. 
  9. ^ a b I.K. Morton; Judith M. Hall (6 December 2012). Concise Dictionary of Pharmacological Agents: Properties and Synonyms. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 261–. ISBN 978-94-011-4439-1. 
  10. ^ Lagova ND, Sof'ina ZP, Shkodinskaia EN, Kurdiumova KN, Valueva IM (1988). "[The antineoplastic activity of testiphenon]". Vopr Onkol (in Russian). 34 (11): 1363–8. PMID 3201773. 
  11. ^ J. Elks (14 November 2014). The Dictionary of Drugs: Chemical Data: Chemical Data, Structures and Bibliographies. Springer. p. 1122. ISBN 978-1-4757-2085-3. 
  12. ^ Chavis C, de Gourcy C, Borgna JL, Imbach JL (1982). "New steroidal nitrosoureas". Steroids. 39 (2): 129–47. PMID 7071885. 
  13. ^ a b J. Elks (14 November 2014). The Dictionary of Drugs: Chemical Data: Chemical Data, Structures and Bibliographies. Springer. pp. 660–. ISBN 978-1-4757-2085-3. 
  14. ^ a b Index Nominum 2000: International Drug Directory. Taylor & Francis. January 2000. pp. 716–717. ISBN 978-3-88763-075-1. 
  15. ^ a b I.K. Morton; Judith M. Hall (6 December 2012). Concise Dictionary of Pharmacological Agents: Properties and Synonyms. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 978-94-011-4439-1. 
  16. ^ Hartley-Asp B, Wilkinson R, Venitt S, Harrap KR (1981). "Studies on the mechanism of action of LS 1727, a nitrosocarbamate of 19-nortestosterone". Acta Pharmacol Toxicol (Copenh). 48 (2): 129–38. PMID 6167141.