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List of counties in Hawaii

The five counties of Hawaii on the Hawaiian Islands enjoy somewhat greater status than many counties on the United States mainland. Counties in Hawaii are the only constituted government bodies below that of the state. No formal level of government exists below that of the county in Hawaii. Unlike the other 49 states, Hawaii does not delegate educational responsibility to local school boards. Hawaiian counties collect property taxes and user fees in order to support road maintenance, community activities, garbage collection, police and fire suppression services. All the counties were created in 1905 from unorganized territory, seven years after the Territory of Hawaii was created; the county of Kalawao was exclusively used as a leper colony, does not have many of the elected officials the other counties do. Many services for Kalawao County are provided by Maui County. For example, the web site for the office of the Maui County Clerk says "The office is responsible for the elections in the County of Maui and the County of Kalawao".

The Federal Information Processing Standard code, used by the United States government to uniquely identify counties, is provided with each entry. The FIPS code for each county links to census data for that county

Bay City, Oregon

Bay City is a city in Tillamook County, United States. The population was 1,286 at the 2010 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.62 square miles, of which, 1.26 square miles is land and 0.36 square miles is water. This region experiences warm and dry summers, with no average monthly temperatures above 71.6 °F. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Bay City has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate, abbreviated "Csb" on climate maps; as of the census of 2010, there were 1,286 people, 546 households, 352 families living in the city. The population density was 1,020.6 inhabitants per square mile. There were 650 housing units at an average density of 515.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 92.7% White, 0.8% Native American, 0.9% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 3.3% from other races, 2.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.7% of the population. There were 546 households of which 24.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.5% had a male householder with no wife present, 35.5% were non-families.

24.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.80. The median age in the city was 46.5 years. 19.4% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 49.1 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,149 people, 493 households, 336 families living in the city; the population density was 903.4 people per square mile. There were 579 housing units at an average density of 455.2 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 93.73% White, 0.44% African American, 1.74% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.17% Pacific Islander, 0.87% from other races, 2.35% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.13% of the population. There were 493 households out of which 24.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.6% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.8% were non-families.

26.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.81. In the city, the population was spread out with 20.3% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 26.5% from 25 to 44, 27.5% from 45 to 64, 19.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.7 males. The median income for a household in the city was $33,375, the median income for a family was $41,563. Males had a median income of $33,558 versus $21,827 for females; the per capita income for the city was $18,731. About 9.1% of families and 12.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.2% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over. The Bay City Arts Center is a non-profit organization that supports arts events. Nellie Owens, lived here with her husband and children Media related to Bay City, Oregon at Wikimedia Commons Entry for Bay City in the Oregon Blue Book

2008 Scottish Labour Party deputy leadership election

The 2008 Scottish Labour Party deputy leadership election was an internal party election to choose a new deputy leader of the Labour Party in the Scottish Parliament, was triggered following the resignation of Cathy Jamieson, who stood down in order to campaign in the leadership election, being held alongside the deputy leadership election. Johann Lamont was elected deputy leader on Saturday 13 September; the timetable for the election was finalised on Monday 28 July, is identical to that of the leadership election. Nominations closed on Friday 1 August with the result declaration being made on 13 September. Johann Lamont – nominated by 18 MSPs Bill Butler – nominated by 7 MSPsBoth of the declared candidates received more than five nominations from MSPs, the minimum requirement for them to get onto the ballot paper, by the close of nominations at 12:00 UTC+1 on 1 August 2008. Candidates are nominated by their parliamentary colleagues from within the Scottish Parliament, following which Westminster MPs, constituency Labour parties and affiliated trade union organisation can submit'supporting nominations', providing their backing to a specific candidates.

These nominations can be seen in the tables below: The election took place using Alternative Vote in an electoral college, with a third of the votes allocated to Labour's MSPs, Scottish MPs and Scottish MEPs, a third to individual members of the Scottish Labour Party, a third to individual members of affiliated organisations trade unions. In order to be elected, one candidate must have achieved a majority of i.e. 50 % plus 1 vote. Source: The Citizen: Campaigning for Socialism The following either publicly suggested they would stand for election or received media speculation to that effect. However, at the close of nominations they had not been nominated by any MSPs. Des McNulty has said he would "be inviting support from Holyrood colleagues". McNulty nominated Johann Lamont. Margaret Curran. Intended to stand in the leadership election. Curran nominated Johann Lamont. 2008 Scottish Labour Party leadership election