List of early English cricketers to 1771

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This is a list of the earliest known English cricketers whose careers began prior to the first matches which are considered to be first-class status in 1772; the list is by season, this being the season in which the player's name first appears in surviving sources.

Cricket underwent radical changes during the 18th century. Patronage and popular support enabled it to outgrow its roots as a village pastime and develop into a major sport. In the early 1760s, pitched delivery bowling was introduced and this necessitated the invention of the straight bat: an evolution in bowling and batting techniques that radically changed cricket.

The earliest known scorecards date from 1744 but it was not until 1772 that they began to be completed and are preserved on a regular basis.

Cricketers[edit]

To 1725[edit]

Many of the surviving records regarding cricket in the 17th century are from court cases; these include some of the names of people known to have played cricket. For example in a court case held at Guildford in 1698, John Derrick recalled playing cricket on a particular parcel of land when he was a pupil at the Royal Grammar School, Guildford fifty years earlier.[1], whilst in 1611 Bartholomew Wyatt and Richard Latter of Sidlesham in Sussex were both prosecuted for "breaking the Sabbath" by playing cricket on a Sunday.[2] The earliest known reference to cricket in London in 1617 concerns Oliver Cromwell, the future Lord Protector, who played the game there whilst training at the Inns of Court.[3]

A 1624 case records that Jasper Vinall of West Hoathly in Sussex died as the result of an injury during a game, caused by a blow on the head from Edward Tye's bat, he is the sport's earliest known fatality.[4] Further court cases throughout the 17th century record the names of those prosecuted for breaking the sabbath,[5] involved in tithe disputes[6] or in disputes over unpaid wagers.[7]

Sir Robert Paston mentioned in a letter that he had been a "cricketting" on Richmond Green in 1666[8] whilst at around the same time John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough had played cricket whilst a pupil at St Paul's School, London.[9] A reference in 1676 records Henry Tonge playing cricket at the British Mission in Aleppo, Turkey, the earliest known record of cricket being played outside England.[10]

By the beginning of the 18th century, records of names people who might be considered cricketers begin to emerge.

Year Name Location Notes
1702 Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond and Lennox by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt.jpg
Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond
Sussex The sport's earliest known leading patron.[11]
1709 William Bedle Dartford and Kent Bedle's 1768 obituary states that he was the "most expert cricket player in England".[12]
1724 Edwin Stead Kent A leading patron of Kent cricket who died young in 1735.[13]
William Goodwin Sunbury and Middlesex Described as "able to play at Cricket with most People". Sunbury had a noted team.[14]
1725 Sir William Gage, 7th Baronet Sussex Along with the 2nd Duke of Richmond, one of the leading patrons of early cricket. His estate at Firle in Sussex was an important early venue.[15][16]
Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond.jpg
Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond
Sussex and Slindon One of the leading patrons of early cricket.[17][18]
Edmund Chapman Believed to have played for Chertsey and possibly Croydon and Surrey teams, his 1763 obituary described him as "one of the most dextrous cricket players in England" and as "an eminent master bricklayer".[19]

1726 to 1740[edit]

Year Name Sides Notes
1726 Perry London Along with Piper, took part in the earliest known single wicket match. The players were well-known as the contemporary report calls them "the noted Perry of London and the famous Piper of Hampton".[20]
Piper Hampton
1727 Alan Brodrick, 2nd Viscount Midleton Surrey A Surrey patron who was partly responsible for drawing up the first known rules of the game.[21]
Thomas Waymark Sussex and Berkshire Accounted the first great all-rounder, Waymark played for over 20 years and was noted for his "extraordinary agility and dexterity".[22]
1729 John Chitty Surrey The owner of what is now the world's oldest surviving cricket bat (pictured), which is kept in the museum at The Oval.[23]
1730 Mr Andrews Sunbury and Surrey A Surrey patron who challenged the Duke of Richmond's team in 1730.[24]
1731 Frederick Prince of Wales.jpg
Frederick, Prince of Wales
Surrey Heir to the throne who became very interested in cricket when he first came to England from Hanover and was a leading patron for the rest of his life.[25]
Tim Coleman London Described in a contemporary report as "the famous Tim Coleman".[25]
Thomas Chambers Middlesex A Middlesex patron who challenged the Duke of Richmond's team in 1731.[26]
1732 Christopher Jones London? Keeper of the Artillery Ground.[27]
1734 Charles Sackville, Lord Middlesex Kent An occasional patron of Kent cricket.[28]
Lord John Philip Sackville Kent A leading patron of Kent cricket who was also a noted player.[28]
1735 Cook Brentford Described by a contemporary reporter as "one of the best bowlers in England".[29][30] Recorded in two matches in 1735 at Moulsey Hurst, he played as a given man for London Cricket Club versus Surrey on 7 June and for a combined London & Middlesex XI versus Kent on 12 July.
Dunn London Evidently a top order batsman who is mentioned in three match reports.[29]
Ellis London Described by a contemporary reporter as London's "best bowler".[29]
Wakeland London Made two known appearances in single wicket contests.[31]
Wheatley London Evidently a top order batsman, known to have been a distiller by trade.[29]
Marshall London Recorded in one match in 1735.[31]
Pool London Recorded in one match in 1735.[31]
Mr Jervoise Croydon and Surrey A Surrey patron who was active in 1735.[32]
Wood Woodcot, Surrey Mentioned briefly in a 1735 report. There were apparently two Woods of Woodcot.[29]
1736 George Oldner London Appeared in a top-class single wicket contest, alongside Wakeland, against two unnamed Richmond players who were reputedly the best in England.[33]
1737 John Boots Sussex Village cricket player who died during a match after colliding with another player.[34]
3rd duke of marlborough.jpg
Charles Spencer, 3rd Duke of Marlborough
London Patron and team captain.[35]
1739 John Bowra Bromley Known as the "Kentish Shepherd" and believed to be the father of William Bowra.[36]
1740 Darville Berkshire Apparently Thomas Waymark's employer at Bray Mills in Berkshire. A patron who is recorded playing in three single wicket matches in 1748.[37]
John Newland Slindon Brother of Richard Newland. First mentioned in correspondence to Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle by the 2nd Duke of Richmond as someone "that you must remember".[38]
George Smith London A publican who was also the groundkeeper of the Artillery Ground. Although he was an occasional player in significant matches, he was better known for his financial problems and his battles against bankruptcy.[39]

1741 to 1745[edit]

Year Name Sides Notes
1741 John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford Bedfordshire Patron and captain of his county team.[40]
George Montagu-Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax Northamptonshire Patron and captain of his county team.[40]
John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich Huntingdonshire Patron and captain of his county team.[40]
Richard Grenville Buckinghamshire Patron and captain of his county team.[41]
1743 Richard Newland Slindon One of the most outstanding players of the sport's pioneering era before the introduction of the pitched delivery. Made the highest known individual score of the period.[42]
John Bryant Kent Known to have played in single-wicket matches from 1743 onwards.[43] Played for Slindon in 1744 and for Kent against England at the Artillery Ground later the same year.[44] May have been the brother of James Bryant.[citation needed]
John Cutbush Kent Played in a single-wicket match in 1743 billed as contested by "the six best players in England" and for Kent against England at the Artillery Ground in 1744.[43]
Ridgeway Sussex
Robert Colchin Bromley and Kent Known as Long Robin, Colchin was a controversial figure who was held to be both the best batsman and all-rounder of his time. An outstanding single wicket player and an influential match organiser.[45]
Tom Peake Chelsfield and Kent Kent player who was frequently called upon as a given man.[45]
Val Romney Sevenoaks and Kent Noted for his leadership and described by James Love as "a mighty player".[43]
William Hodsoll Dartford and Kent An outstanding bowler who was rated among "the six best players in England".[43]
William Sawyer Richmond and Surrey Rated among "the six best players in England".[43]
Lord Montfort London Patron and team captain who led the London, Middlesex & Surrey XI in May 1743.[46]
Stephen Rose Chertsey An army deserter reported to be "a famous cricket player".[47]
1744 Adam Newland Slindon Brother of Richard Newland. Noted member of the Slindon team.[42]
Little Bennett London Probably the brother of Tall Bennett. The two were noted in contemporary reports to have been two of the best batsmen of their time.[39]
Tall Bennett
Collins Surrey Mentioned in 1744 and 1748; played for London against Slindon in the earliest match that has a surviving scorecard.[39]
Edward Aburrow senior Slindon and Sussex A known smuggler who played under his alias to disguise himself. Father of the Hambledon player of the same name, he is recorded in matches to 1751. A noted single wicket player who was known as Cuddy.[39]
George Jackson Addington and Surrey Known to have been a good batsman who frequently played in single wicket contests, he is recorded in matches to 1752.[39]
Green Amberley and Sussex Recorded in three matches to 1747.[39]
Howlett London Made two known appearances in 1744 and 1745.[39]
James Bryant Bromley and Kent Played for the Kent county team.[39] Possibly brother of John Bryant
James Love Richmond A playing member at Richmond but better known as a poet.[48]
Joe Harris Addington and Surrey Brother of John Harris and recorded until 1756. Made 26 known appearances in single wicket and 15 in significant matches.[39]
John Harris Addington and Surrey Brother of Joe Harris and recorded until 1754. Made 11 known appearances in single wicket and 12 in significant matches.[39]
John Mills Horsmonden and Kent A noted bowler but is only recorded in one match.[48]
Kipps Eltham and Kent A noted wicketkeeper who is recorded four times to 1747.[48]
Maynard Surrey Recorded in 12 matches to 1750.[39]
Norris London Made two known appearances in 1744 and 1745.[39]
Stephen Dingate Reigate, Surrey Believed to have been a barber by trade, one of the leading single wicket players of the 1740s.[39]
Stevens Surrey Two players called Stevens were due to play in the London v Slindon match on 2 June 1744 but did not take part and are not mentioned in other sources.[39]
Tom Faulkner Addington and Surrey A prominent single wicket player who is recorded to 1761. Was also a prizefighter who fought under the sobriquet of "Long Tom".[39]
Andrews Slindon and Sussex Recorded in one match in 1744.[39]
Bartram Kent Recorded in one match in 1744.[48]
Butler London Recorded in one match in 1744.[39]
Danes Kent Recorded in one match in 1744.[48]
Hodder London Recorded in one match in 1744.[39]
Mills Kent Recorded in one match in 1744.[48]
1745 Broad Addington and Surrey Mentioned in match reports from 1745 to 1750.[49]
Howard Kent Mentioned in match reports from 1745 to 1752.[49]
Robert Lascoe Bromley and Kent Mentioned in match reports from 1745 to 1748.[49]
William Anderson London Mentioned in match reports from 1745 to 1752. It is believed a benefit match was held for him in 1753.[49]
Hodge Long Robin's XI Recorded in one match in 1745.[49]
Jacob Mann Richard Newland's XI Recorded in one match in 1745.[49]
Martin Richard Newland's XI Recorded in one match in 1745.[49]
Norton Richard Newland's XI Recorded in one match in 1745.[49]

1746 to 1760[edit]

Year Name Sides Notes
1747 John Bell Dartford and Kent Noted wicketkeeper who was referred to after his death as "the most noted cricketer in England". Ran the Eleven Cricketers public house on East Hill in Dartford.[50]
Thomas Bell Dartford and Kent Brother of the above. Condemned to death in 1762 but later reprieved.[50]
John Mansfield Sevenoaks and Kent Batsman noted for single wicket appearances.[50]
John Larkin Hadlow and Kent Noted single wicket performer.[50]
Jones Hadlow and Kent Mentioned in match reports from 1747 to 1749.[50]
Joseph Rudd Sussex Noted single wicket performer.[51]
Pye Sussex Noted single wicket performer.[51]
Robert Eures Bexley and Kent Known to have been a good batsman who played for All-England teams.[50]
Thomas Jure London Mentioned in match reports from 1747 to 1749.[50]
Allen Kent Recorded in one match in 1747.[50]
1748 Durling Addington and Surrey Mentioned in match reports from 1748 to 1761.[37]
John Capon London and Surrey Mentioned in match reports from 1748 to 1755.[37]
George Carter London Recorded four times from 1748 to 1749.[37]
Walker London Recorded in one single wicket match in 1748.[37]
1749 John Frame Dartford and Kent Arguably the first great fast bowler in cricket history and had a long career from 1749 to at least 1774.[52][53]
Perry Surrey Mentioned in match reports from 1749 to 1755. Has been confused with the 1726 player, who could have been a relation.[53]
Humphreys Surrey Recorded in two matches in 1749.[53]
John Colchin Bromley Probably Robert Colchin's brother; recorded in two matches in 1749.[53]
Joseph Hitches Colchin's XI Recorded three times in 1749.[53]
Thomas Southam Colchin's XI Recorded three times in 1749.[53]
Robinson Faulkner's XI Recorded three times in 1749.[53]
1750 Garrett Kent Recorded in five matches from 1750 to 1751.[54]
Rawlings Kent Mentioned in three match reports to 1751.[54]
Robert Bartholomew Surrey Possibly part of a cricketing family, he was also an innkeeper.[54]
Thomas Brandon Dartford and Kent A noted batsman who was mentioned in match reports from 1750 to 1759.[54]
Frame Surrey John Frame's brother; recorded in three matches in 1750.[54]
1751 Stephen Harding Thursley and Chertsey Hard-hitting batsman mentioned in match reports from 1751 to 1765.[55]
Stephens Dartford Mentioned in match reports from 1751 to 1759.[55]
Mathews All-England Recorded in two matches in 1751.[55]
Stone Kent Recorded in two matches in 1751.[55]
Wilden Kent Recorded in two matches in 1751.[55]
1753 William King London Noted as a leading London player in 1753 and 1754.[56]
1754 Parr Chatham Recorded in one single wicket match in 1754.[57]
1755 Clowder London Recorded in one single wicket match in 1755.[37]
1759 Gill Buckinghamshire and All-England Wicket-keeper who played in the first acknowledged first-class match in 1772[58] and is known to have played for Buckinghamshire in two matches in 1759.[59] No biographical details other than his name are known.
John Edmeads Chertsey and Surrey Mentioned in match reports until 1779.[60]
John Haynes Surrey Mentioned in match reports from 1759 to 1761.[59]
Thomas Woods Chertsey and Surrey Only definite reference is in 1761 but probably played in 1759 for All-England. There is confusion in sources with other players named "Woods", "John Wood" and "Thomas Wood".[59]
Allen Middlesex Played in three matches in 1759. No other mentions.[59]
Burchwood Kent Noted bowler. Played in three matches in 1759.[59]
Cheeseman Sussex Played in three matches in 1759. No other mentions.[59]
Gascoigne London Played in three matches in 1759. No other mentions.[59][61]
Nyland Sussex Played in three matches in 1759. No other mentions. Possibly Richard Newland or Richard Nyren.[59]
Saunders Berkshire Played in three matches in 1759. No other mentions.[59]
Goldstone Dartford and Kent Played in three matches in 1759. No other mentions.[59]
Killick Dartford and Kent Played in three matches in 1759. No other mentions.[59]
Potter Dartford and Kent Played in three matches in 1759. No other mentions.[59]
Wakelin Dartford and Kent Played in three matches in 1759. No other mentions.[59]

1761 to 1771[edit]

Year Name Sides Notes
1761 Shock White Brentford Definitely active between 1761 and 1773 but often confused with Thomas "Daddy" White.[62]
Charles Sears Chertsey Played two matches in 1761.[62]
William Piper Chertsey Appeared in one match in 1761 as a given man for Chertsey.[62]
1764 John Small Hambledon and Hampshire Described by John Nyren as "a star of the first magnitude",[63] master batsman John Small is buried in St Peter's churchyard (pictured) in his home village of Petersfield.[64]
John Bayton Hambledon and Hampshire Noted batsman of the late 1760s whose career apparently ended in the early 1770s.[65]
Peter Stewart Hambledon and Hampshire Nicknamed "Buck", a humorist who was a Hambledon mainstay through the club's formative period.[60]
Richard Nyren Hambledon and Hampshire Cricket's earliest known left-hander. An outstanding all-rounder who captained the Hambledon team in its heyday.[59]
Squire Thomas Land Hambledon and Hampshire Perhaps the original patron of Hambledon cricket who seems to have left the scene before the club was founded.[65]
Thomas Baldwin Chertsey Active in the 1760s.[66]
Thomas Ridge Hambledon and Hampshire Prominent Hambledon Club member who played in a number of matches to 1775.[65]
William Barber Hambledon and Hampshire Noted bowler, probably fast-medium, who played until 1777.[67]
William Hogsflesh Hambledon and Hampshire Noted bowler, probably fast-medium, who played until 1775.[68]
Edward Woolgar Hambledon and Hampshire Tentative reference re one match in 1764.[65]
John Woolgar Hambledon and Hampshire Tentative reference re one match in 1764.[65]
Osmond Hambledon and Hampshire Tentative reference re one match in 1764.[65]
1765 Richard Edmeads Chertsey Brother of John Edmeads; recorded in one match in 1765.[69]
1767 Edward "Curry" Aburrow Hambledon and Hampshire Son of "Cuddy" Aburrow. A Hampshire regular to 1782.[70]
Henry Rowett Caterham and Surrey Patron of Surrey cricket who was chiefly associated with the Caterham club in the 1760s.[12]
Sir Horatio Mann, 2nd Baronet Kent A leading patron of Kent cricket.[70]
Tom Sueter Hambledon and Hampshire Outstanding wicketkeeper-batsman, especially noted for his front foot play.[71]
1768 John Frederick Sackville, 3rd Duke of Dorset by Sir Joshua Reynolds.png
John Frederick Sackville, 3rd Duke of Dorset
Kent A leading patron of Kent cricket and a useful player in his own right.[72][73]
Bellchambers Surrey Recorded in two matches to 1769.[72]
James Fuggles Kent Kent batsman who was last recorded in 1773.[72]
John Boorman Kent and Essex Prominent bowler to 1793.[59]
Joseph Miller Kent Outstanding batsman who was active till 1783. Some confusion exists re his first name but the majority of sources call him Joseph.[12][74]
Richard May Kent Noted bowler of the 1760s and 1770s. Brother of Thomas May.[75]
Thomas May Kent Batsman who played until 1773. Brother of Richard May.[75]
Richard Simmons Kent One of the earliest well-known wicketkeepers. Active till 1779.[12]
William Palmer Kent and Surrey Noted batsman to 1776.[12]
Birchet Surrey Recorded in two matches in 1768.[72]
Brobham Dartford and Kent Recorded in one single wicket match in 1768 and a match for Dartford in 1775.[72]
Foule Caterham Recorded as top scorer in one match in 1768.[12]
Mandy Kent Recorded in one single wicket match in 1768.[72]
Muddle Kent Recorded in two matches in 1768.[72]
Smailes Caterham Recorded in two matches from 1768 to 1769.[12]
Blake Caterham Tentative reference re one match in 1768.[12]
Carpenter Caterham Tentative reference re one match in 1768.[12]
Edward Francis Caterham Tentative reference re one match in 1768.[12]
T. Francis Caterham Tentative reference re one match in 1768.[12]
Golding Bourne Tentative reference re one match in 1768.[12]
Love Bourne Tentative reference re one match in 1768.[12]
Miller Caterham Tentative reference re one match in 1768.[12]
Twinker Caterham Tentative reference re one match in 1768.[12]
Ward Bourne Tentative reference re one match in 1768.[12]
1769 Lumpy Stevens Chertsey and Surrey One of the greatest bowlers of the underarm era. Had a long career from c. 1756 to 1789.[76]
Jasper Fish Kent Recorded in three matches between 1769 and 1777.[77]
John Wood Kent Noted bowler who was active until 1783. Sources have often failed to disambiguate him re John Wood of Surrey.[77]
George Leer Hambledon and Hampshire Middle order batsman who was mainly noted for his fielding.[70]
John Minshull Kent and Surrey Scorer of the earliest known century in all forms of cricket and a noted batsman in the 1760s and 1770s.[78]
Thomas Brett Hambledon and Hampshire Outstanding fast bowler who was acclaimed for his combination of speed and accuracy.[79]
Page Chertsey and Surrey Active till 1773.[77]
Thomas Pattenden Kent Played in over thirty matches from 1772 to 1783. In some scorecards, he cannot be disambiguated from his brother William.[77]
Thomas Quiddington Chertsey and Surrey Noted bowler mentioned in reports from 1769 to 1784. His name has also been spelt Quiddenden.[77]
John Wood (Surrey) Chertsey and Surrey Noted all-rounder who was active until 1780. Sources have often failed to disambiguate him re John Wood of Kent and S&B always calls him Thomas Wood.[77]
William Bowra Kent and Sussex Probably the son of John Bowra. Sound middle-order batsman who is believed to have been a good close fielder.[80]
Glazier Hambledon and Hampshire Recorded in one match in 1769.[77]
Purdy Hambledon and Hampshire Recorded in one match in 1769.[77]
Shepherd Caterham and Surrey Recorded in one match in 1769.[77]
Wessing Caterham and Surrey Recorded in one match in 1769.[77]
S. Bartram Duke of Dorset's XI Recorded in one match in 1769.[81]
Bishop Duke of Dorset's XI Recorded in one match in 1769.[81]
Oliver Duke of Dorset's XI Recorded in one match in 1769.[81]
Shearcy Duke of Dorset's XI Recorded in one match in 1769.[81]
Whiting Duke of Dorset's XI Recorded in one match in 1769.[81]
1771 Coleman Nottingham Two known matches, 1771–72.[82]
Collishaw Nottingham Two known matches, 1771–72.[82]
Reverend Reynell Cotton Hambledon President of the Hambledon Club in 1773 and 1774. Best known for composing the Hambledon Club Song c. 1771. It is not certain if he was ever a player.[83]
John Thomas de Burgh Hambledon and Hampshire Occasional player in the early 1770s. Became the 13th Earl of Clanricarde.[84]
Huythwaite Nottingham One match against Sheffield.[82]
Loughman Nottingham Two known matches, 1771–72.[82]
Mew Nottingham Two known matches, 1771–72.[82]
Osguthorpe Sheffield One match against Nottingham.[82]
WrightHarryPeckham.jpg
Harry Peckham
Sussex Occasional player who contributed to the 1774 Laws of Cricket.[84]
Rawson Nottingham One match against Sheffield.[82]
Roe Nottingham Two known matches, 1771–72.[82]
Spurr Nottingham Two known matches, 1771–72.[82]
Stocks Nottingham Two known matches, 1771–72.[82]
Troop Nottingham Two known matches, 1771–72.[82]
Turner Nottingham Two known matches, 1771–72.[82]
Thomas White Chertsey and Surrey Noted all-rounder who instigated the Monster Bat Controversy. Retired in 1779.[85]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Altham, p. 21.
  2. ^ McCann, p. xxxi.
  3. ^ Altham, p. 22.
  4. ^ McCann, p. xxxiii.
  5. ^ Major, p. 28.
  6. ^ Bowen, p. 262.
  7. ^ Major, p. 32.
  8. ^ Underdown, p. 13.
  9. ^ Wisden Cricketers' Almanack 1963, p. 178.
  10. ^ Haygarth, p. vi.
  11. ^ McCann, p.1.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Buckley 1935, p.48.
  13. ^ Waghorn 1906, p.6.
  14. ^ Maun, vol. 1, p.29.
  15. ^ Sir William Gage, CricInfo. Retrieved 2019-01-31.
  16. ^ McCann, p. 4.
  17. ^ Underdown, p.38.
  18. ^ Birley, p.18.
  19. ^ Waghorn 1906, p. 31.
  20. ^ Buckley, 18th century, p. 3.
  21. ^ McCann, pp. 6–7.
  22. ^ Major, p. 47.
  23. ^ Bowen, p. 263.
  24. ^ Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 1.
  25. ^ a b Waghorn, Dawn of Cricket, p. 10.
  26. ^ Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 3.
  27. ^ Buckley, pre-Victorian, p. 1.
  28. ^ a b Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 7.
  29. ^ a b c d e Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 8.
  30. ^ Buckley, 18th Century, p.10.
  31. ^ a b c Buckley, 18th century, p. 11.
  32. ^ Buckley, 18th century, p. 10.
  33. ^ Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 13.
  34. ^ McCann, p. 16.
  35. ^ Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 18.
  36. ^ Buckley, 18th century, p. 15.
  37. ^ a b c d e f Ashley-Cooper, Cricket 1748
  38. ^ Maun, vol. 1, p. 99.
  39. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r McCann, pp. 26–27.
  40. ^ a b c Maun, vol. 1, pp. 106–107.
  41. ^ Maun, vol. 1, p. 108.
  42. ^ a b Ashley-Cooper, Cricket 1742
  43. ^ a b c d e Buckley, 18th century, p. 17.
  44. ^ John Bryant, CricketArchive. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  45. ^ a b Ashley-Cooper, Cricket 1743
  46. ^ Waghorn, Dawn of Cricket, p. 13.
  47. ^ Maun, vol. 1, p. 117.
  48. ^ a b c d e f Haygarth, p. 1.
  49. ^ a b c d e f g h Ashley-Cooper, Cricket 1745
  50. ^ a b c d e f g h Ashley-Cooper, Cricket 1747
  51. ^ a b McCann, p. 41.
  52. ^ Haygarth, p.18.
  53. ^ a b c d e f g Ashley-Cooper, Cricket 1749
  54. ^ a b c d e Ashley-Cooper, Cricket 1750
  55. ^ a b c d e Ashley-Cooper, Cricket 1751
  56. ^ Buckley, 18th century, p. 33.
  57. ^ Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 53.
  58. ^ Gill, CricketArchive. Retrieved 2019-01-20.
  59. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Haygarth, pp. 2–3.
  60. ^ a b Haygarth, p. 43.
  61. ^ Buckley, 18th century, p. 38.
  62. ^ a b c Buckley, 18th century, p. 39.
  63. ^ Nyren, p. 57.
  64. ^ Haygarth, pp. 241–242.
  65. ^ a b c d e f Mote, p. 164.
  66. ^ Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 57.
  67. ^ Haygarth, p. 34.
  68. ^ Haygarth, p.23.
  69. ^ Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 59.
  70. ^ a b c Haygarth, p. 55.
  71. ^ Haygarth, p. 126.
  72. ^ a b c d e f g Buckley, 18th century, p. 47.
  73. ^ Haygarth, p. 59.
  74. ^ Haygarth, p. 58.
  75. ^ a b Haygarth, p. 4.
  76. ^ Haygarth, p. 98.
  77. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Waghorn, Dawn of Cricket, pp. 31–33.
  78. ^ Haygarth, p.44.
  79. ^ Haygarth, p. 39.
  80. ^ Haygarth, p.27.
  81. ^ a b c d e CricketArchive – scorecard for Dorset's XI v Wrotham on 31 August 1769
  82. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Buckley, FLPVC, pp. 6–7.
  83. ^ Mote, p. 54 and pp. 402–405.
  84. ^ a b McCann, p. 77.
  85. ^ Haygarth, p. 40.

Bibliography[edit]

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