List of historically significant English cricket teams

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The purpose of this list is to identify all historically significant English cricket clubs and teams which played in significant matches, some of which may have been given first-class status. It concentrates on those which are now defunct or not currently significant; the list, therefore, excludes County Championship clubs, Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), touring teams and the main university clubs. Clubs in the Minor Counties Cricket Championship or in one of the ECB Premier Leagues are excluded unless they formerly played in important or first-class matches.

Note that some clubs which folded were subsequently refounded as modern league clubs. Many of the teams were ad hoc units or "scratch teams" named after their organiser (e.g., Alfred Shaw's XI) while others are combinations (e.g., London & Surrey).[1] The total column gives the number of matches that the team is known to have played in. In the source column, if only one citation is given, it relates to the earliest known mention of the team in the surviving records.

N.B. The list is believed complete for clubs and teams that were active in significant cricket up to 1825. Many clubs and teams post-1825 are already included but they are not exhaustive.

A[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1786 A to C Moulsey Hurst 1 [2]
notes

"A to C" was in fact a Kent Eleven and it was a curiosity that they selected only players whose names began with A, B or C while their D to Z opponents, who were in fact a Hampshire team with given men, selected only players whose names did not begin A, B or C. Haygarth in S&B calls it "Hambledon Club with Lumpy versus Kent"; the venue, in Surrey, was neutral. Haygarth says he saw the alphabetical title in other sources.

1831–1833 A to K Lord's 2 [3][4]
notes

The two "A to K" versus "L to Z" matches in 1831 and 1833 were among the few genuine alphabetical matches, they were both played at Lord's by teams of MCC members supplemented by a few leading professionals including Jem Broadbridge, William Lillywhite, Fuller Pilch and Ned Wenman. The 1833 match was 12-a-side.

1787–1789 A to M Lord's Old Ground and Bourne Paddock 5 [5]
notes

According to CricketArchive (CA), teams called "A to M" and "N to Z" played each other five times in three seasons from 1787; the main secondary source for the five matches is Scores & Biographies (S&B) which calls the two teams "Earl of Winchilsea's Side" and "Sir Horace (Horatio) Mann's Side". There is nothing in S&B to suggest that the teams were organised alphabetically. Furthermore, the so-called "A to M" teams included Tom Taylor and the "N to Z" included James Aylward and William Fennex. CA claims that these were "given men" and also that the two patrons evidently alternated between the teams, which would put Winchilsea into "A to M" and Mann into "N to Z"; the S&B version is supported by the ACS and Stumpsite.[6][7]

See the entries below for Earl of Winchilsea's XI and Sir Horatio Mann's XI.

1733 Acton & Ealing
notes
1743–1752 Addington
notes
1746 Addington & Bromley
notes
1747 Addington & Croydon
notes
1745–1746 Addington & Lingfield
notes
1811 Benjamin Aislabie's XI
notes
1846–1881 All-England Eleven (AEE)
notes
1775 Alphabetical Artillery Ground and Moulsey Hurst 2 [8]
notes

This refers to two matches organised by the Duke of Dorset and the Earl of Tankerville in May 1775, the first one played at the Artillery Ground and the return at Moulsey Hurst two days later. Details of the teams are unknown and so it cannot be said which letters of the alphabet applied to each team. All that is known is that the patrons made two "Grand Alphabetical Matches".

1776–1785 Alresford
notes
1782 Alresford & Odiham
notes
1780–1784 Alton & Odiham
notes
1789 S. Amherst's XI
notes
1919 Army and Navy
notes
1702 Arundel Bury Hill aka Berry Hill 1 [9]
notes

It is believed that the Arundel club was formally constituted in 1704 but, two years earlier, an Arundel team took part in a match against a team raised by Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond; the venue for that match is unknown but Arundel's ground at Bury Hill was in use for other important matches through much of the 18th century. The Arundel club remains active at league level in Sussex.

B[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1805–1832 Bs
notes
1822 Bakewell
notes
1907–1909 J. Bamford's XI
notes
1883 R. G. Barlow's XI
notes
1802 W. Barton's XI
notes
1798–1817 Lord Frederick Beauclerk's XI
notes
1741 Bedfordshire Woburn Park [10]
notes

First recorded in two matches against a combined Huntingdonshire & Northamptonshire team; the county's first patron and captain was John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford.

1746–1795 Berkshire
notes
1740 Berkshire, Buckinghamshire & Hertfordshire
notes
1743 Berkshire, Buckinghamshire & Middlesex
notes
1779 Berkshire & Hampshire
notes
1810 Captain Blagrave's XI
notes
1792–1813 E. Bligh's XI
notes
1766–1773 Bourne
notes
1747 John Bowra's XI
notes
1730–1799 Brentford
notes
1771 Brentford, Hampton & Richmond
notes
1770–1799 Brentford & Richmond
notes
1732 Brentford & Sunbury
notes
1790–1825 Brighton
notes
1912–1939 British Army (or "Army")
notes
1940–1945 British Empire XI
notes
1727 Alan Brodrick's XI Peper Harow 2 [11]
notes

The earliest known written rules were the Articles of Agreement written by Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond and Alan Brodrick, two of cricket's foremost patrons, applicable to the two matches in 1727 which they promoted; the results of the matches are unknown.

1742–1808 Bromley
notes
1743 Bromley & Chislehurst
notes
1749 Bromley & London
notes
1747 Bromley & Ripley
notes
1741–1785 Buckinghamshire [12]
notes

Richard Grenville was the county's first patron and captain for a match against Northamptonshire.

1816–1818 E. H. Budd's XI
notes
1795–1796 Bullingdon
notes
1821–1825 Bury St Edmunds
notes
1810 Colonel Byng's XI
notes

C[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1932–1936 Sir Julien Cahn's XI
notes
1926 F. S. G. Calthorpe's XI
notes
1817–1877 Cambridge Town Club
notes
1826–1833 Cambridge Union Club
notes
1882–1890 Cambridge University Past & Present
notes
1857–1871 Cambridgeshire
notes
1864 Cambridgeshire & Yorkshire
notes
1803 W. R. Capel's XI
notes
1923 Capped (in Capped v Uncapped match at Hastings)
notes
1767–1770 Caterham
notes
1769 Caterham & Coulsdon
notes
c.1611 Chalkhill unknown 1 [13]
notes

A team with this name took part in the world's earliest known organised match at Chevening, Kent against opponents called Weald and Upland.

1731 Thomas Chambers' XI
notes
1705–1773 Chatham unknown 2 [14][15]
notes

The first reference to a team from Chatham, Kent, is a match against West of Kent in 1705, one of the earliest known important matches. There is a specific reference to a "Chatham Club" re a single wicket match in 1754.[16] In the last quarter of the 18th century, Chatham was mainly associated with George Louch and is believed to have used a ground owned by him for its home matches, though there are references in 1785 and 1787 to Chatham Lines as a venue.[17] There are some 19th century references but the Chatham club ultimately folded and there is no real modern equivalent, not even in Kent league cricket; the town of Chatham is famous historically for the Royal Dockyard but it is not known if there was any connection between the dockyard and the cricket club.

1731–1789 Chelsea Chelsea Common 4 [18][19]
notes

Chelsea Common virtually disappeared under building work in the 19th century.[20] Records have survived of five important matches between 1731 and 1789 which involved the Chelsea club and/or were played on the common; the first, played on the common for the high stake of 50 guineas, was Chelsea v Fulham on Tuesday, 13 July 1731. Fulham won. There was a return at Parsons Green on Tuesday, 10 August 1731, which Fulham won by 3 runs. On Tuesday, 26 June 1733, Fulham again hosted Chelsea at Parsons Green, this time for 30 guineas, but the result of this match is unknown. On Monday, 16 August 1736, there was an inter-county match on the common between Middlesex and Surrey; the stake was 50 guineas and Middlesex won by 9 runs.[21] The last match found in the records was on Thursday, 10 and Friday, 11 September 1789 when Chelsea played Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) in Marlborough Gardens, Chelsea; this match, which was of dubious status, was probably drawn after a postponement.[22]

1731 Chelsfield
notes
1736–1784 Chertsey
notes
1762 Chertsey & Dartford
notes
1822–1855 Cheshire
notes
1724–1726 Chingford unknown 1 [23][24]
notes

In 1724, Edwin Stead's XI v Chingford ended early because the Chingford team refused to play to a finish when Stead's team had the advantage. Lord Chief Justice Pratt presided over the ensuing court case and ordered the teams, as in the London v Rochester match in 1718, to play it out so that all wagers could be fulfilled; the game was completed in 1726 but the final result is not on record. Chingford's involvement is the earliest known reference to Essex cricket but the 1724 venue is uncertain and so not definitely the first match played in the county.

1738–1746 Chislehurst
notes
1746 Chislehurst & London
notes
1927 Civil Service
notes
1920–1946 Combined Services aka Services XI
notes
1832 Sir St Vincent Cotton's XI
notes
1771–1784 Coulsdon
notes
1751 Country XI
notes
1787–1788 Coventry
notes
1923–1924 Lord Cowdray's XI
notes
1707–1798 Croydon Duppas Hill 23 [25]
notes

A leading club in the 1730s, especially, when it was sometimes representative of Surrey as a county.

D[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1786 D to Z aka Rest of the Alphabet Moulsey Hurst 1 [2]
notes

D to Z played against A to C, which was in fact a Kent Eleven and it was a curiosity that they selected only players whose names began with A, B or C while their D to Z opponents, who were in fact a Hampshire team with given men, selected only players whose names did not begin A, B or C. Haygarth in S&B calls it "Hambledon Club with Lumpy versus Kent"; the venue, in Surrey, was neutral. Haygarth says he saw the alphabetical title in other sources.

1870–1880 Richard Daft's XI
notes
1790–1795 Earl of Darnley's XI
notes
1722–1808 Dartford
notes
1896 Earl de la Warr's XI
notes
1896 C. de Trafford's XI
notes
1919 Demobilised Officers
notes
1752 Deptford
notes
1743–1748 Deptford & Greenwich
notes
1746–1749 Stephen Dingate’s XI
notes
1769–1790 3rd Duke of Dorset's XI
notes
1753 Dover
notes
1895–1926 Dublin University
notes
1858–1861 Durham & Yorkshire
notes

E[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1874–1948 East
notes
1788 G. East's XI
notes
1731 East Grinstead
notes
1781–1790 East Kent Bourne Paddock 7 [26]
notes

Although sometimes correctly named "East Kent", some of the teams should more properly be called Sir Horatio Mann's XI. All seven of the matches were against the West Kent equivalent managed by either John Sackville, 3rd Duke of Dorset or Stephen Amherst.

1822 East Kent & Sussex
notes
1787–1824 East Sussex
notes
1746–1752 Edmonton
notes
1881–1883 Tom Emmett's XI
notes
1731 Enfield
notes
1814–1823 Epsom
notes
1737–1808 Essex
notes
1732 Essex & Hertfordshire
notes
1731 Ewell
notes

F[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1782–1786 Farnham
notes
1840–1849 Fast bowlers XI (Fast v Slow matches)
notes
1747–1753 Tom Faulkner's XI
notes
1846 Nicholas Felix's XI
notes
1819 First Letters
notes
1786 Five Parishes
notes
1912–1919 H. K. Foster's XI
notes
1809 Four Chosen & Seven Others
notes
1800 Four Parishes
notes
1733 Frederick, Prince of Wales' XI
notes
1912–1968 Free Foresters
notes
1912 C. B. Fry's XI
notes
1730–1733 Fulham
notes

G[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1725–1737 Sir William Gage's XI Bury Hill, Arundel 11 [27]
notes

Gage was a noted patron of cricket in Sussex and ran his own team for many years. In a 1729 match against Edwin Stead's X, Gage's XI is believed to have achieved the earliest known innings victory.

1806–1962 Gentlemen
notes
1869–1879 Gentlemen & Players XI
notes
1751–1961 Gentlemen of England
notes
1771–1889 Gentlemen of Hampshire
notes
1771–1892 Gentlemen of Kent
notes
1855 Gentlemen of Kent & Surrey
notes
1857 Gentlemen of Kent & Sussex
notes
1729 Gentlemen of London Artillery Ground (assumed) 1 [28]
notes

Played a single match against the Gentlemen of Middlesex. Result unknown.

1853–1906 Gentlemen of MCC
notes
1729 Gentlemen of Middlesex The "Woolpack", Islington 1 [28]
notes

Played a single match against the Gentlemen of London. Result unknown.

1844–1880 Gentlemen of the North
notes
1842–1846 Gentlemen of Nottinghamshire
notes
1844–1920 Gentlemen of the South
notes
1846 Gentlemen of Southwell
notes
1840–1932 Gentlemen of Surrey
notes
1856 Gentlemen of Surrey & Sussex
notes
1771–1910 Gentlemen of Sussex
notes
1800 J. Gibbon's XI
notes
1925; 1958–66 A. E. R. Gilligan's XI Central Recreation Ground, Hastings 12 [29]
notes

An occasional team formed by Arthur Gilligan which played in one match against L. H. Tennyson's XI in 1925 during Gilligan's playing career. Gilligan reformed the team in 1958 for a match against the international tourists (New Zealand in 1958) at Hastings; this became an annual fixture at Hastings until 1966 and Gilligan's team also played against Sussex.

1877 Gloucestershire & Yorkshire
notes
1821–1825 Godalming
notes
1871–1907 W. G. Grace's XI
notes
1730–1767 Greenwich
notes
1762 Guildford
notes

H[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1747–1751 Hadlow
notes
1885–1891 L. Hall's XI
notes
1756–1908 Hambledon
notes

Teams raised by Hambledon are generally termed Hampshire (sometimes Hampshire & Sussex) but there were occasions when a Hambledon team was specifically town- rather than county-orientated.

1790 John Hammond's XI
notes
1766–1863 Hampshire
notes
1826 Hampshire & Surrey
notes
1729 Hampshire, Surrey & Sussex Lewes (unspecific) 2 [28]
notes

The team was alternatively titled Sir William Gage's XI and played twice against Edwin Stead's XI (aka Kent). In the first match at Penshurst Park, it achieved what seems to have been the earliest known innings victory.

1772–1786 Hampshire & Sussex
notes
1726–1770 Hampton
notes
1751 Hampton & Kingston
notes
1924–1928 Harlequins
notes
1793 David Harris' XI
notes
1885–1930 Lord Hawke's XI
notes
1785–1814 Hertfordshire
notes
1892 H. T. Hewett's XI
notes
1796 Highgate
notes
1824 H. Hoare's XI
notes
1745–1747 William Hodsoll's XI
notes
1818–1822 Holt (Norfolk)
notes
1899 Home Counties
notes
1800–1808 Homerton
notes
1785–1791 Hornchurch
notes
1743– Horsmonden
notes

Sometimes played under the title of "Horsmonden & Weald".

1741 Huntingdonshire & Northamptonshire [10]
notes

Formed to play two matches against Bedfordshire, and won both; the patrons were George Montagu-Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax (Northants) and John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich (Hunts).

1890 Hurst Park
notes

I[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1866–1904 I Zingari
notes

J[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1911 G. L. Jessop's XI
notes
1926 V. W. C. Jupp's XI
notes

K[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1796 Kennington
notes
1709–1842 Kent
notes
1874–1876 Kent & Gloucestershire
notes
1775 Kent & London
notes
1775 Kent, London & Surrey
notes
1771 Kent, Middlesex & Surrey
notes
1864 Kent & Nottinghamshire
notes
1746–1859 Kent & Surrey
notes
1836–1902 Kent & Sussex
notes
1742 Kent, Surrey & Sussex
notes
1913 Kent & Yorkshire
notes
1720–1767 Kingston
notes
1739 Kingston & Moulsey
notes
1743 Kingston & Richmond
notes
1814 D. J. W. Kinnaird's XI
notes

L[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1831–1833 L to Z Lord's 2 [3][4]
notes

See A to K entry above.

1809 F. C. Ladbroke's XI
notes
1745–1748 Lambeth
notes
1849–1864 Lancashire
notes
1883–1909 Lancashire & Yorkshire
notes
1852–1869 Lansdown
notes
1819 Last Letters
notes
1890 W. H. Laverton's XI
notes
1761–1765 Leeds
notes
1790–1870 Left-handed XI (Left-handed v Right-handed matches)
notes
1781–1825 Leicester
notes
1781–1800 Leicestershire & Rutland
notes
1793–95 R. Leigh's XI
notes
1795–1802 Charles Lennox's XI
notes
1902–1946 H. D. G. Leveson-Gower's XI
notes
1802 George Leycester's XI
notes
1739–1785 Lingfield
notes
1821–1824 Liverpool
notes
1882–1894 Liverpool and District
notes
1825 H. J. Lloyd's XI
notes
1886–1913 Lord Londesborough's XI
notes
1707–1800 London Artillery Ground numerous [14]
notes

There is mention of a London club in 1722 but its foundation date is unknown and the teams which represented London in the early 18th century could have been ad hoc formations. London from the 1730s to the 1750s should be considered the equivalent of a county team as it was different to the Middlesex and Surrey teams it sometimes opposed, it is most famously associated with the Artillery Ground and was especially prominent in the heyday of single wicket cricket in the 1740s. The original London club faded in the 1760s and 1770s when it was superseded by Hambledon as the focal point of the sport; its last known important match was against its old rivals Dartford in 1778. From 1788, there was another London team, possibly unconnected with the original club, which competed against MCC and Middlesex in several matches to 1798. After that, there is a sole reference to a team called London playing a one-off match against Thames Ditton in 1800. Few details have survived of London's players but they included Ellis (accredited the club's "best bowler"); leading batsmen Little and Tall Bennett; and the noted single wicket players Thomas Jure and John Capon.

1940–1945 London Counties
notes
1900–1904 London County
notes
1735–1770 London & Middlesex
notes
1743 London, Middlesex & Surrey
notes
1726–1758 London & Surrey Kennington Common 7 [30]
notes

Teams called London & Surrey were formed occasionally in the 18th century, playing as a combined team in important matches, mostly against Kent at times when Kent was deemed to be the strongest county; the combined team played one match versus Addington & Lingfield in 1746.

1744–1749 Long Robin's XI
notes
1793 George Louch's XI
notes
1890 Lyric Club
notes

M[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1775–1781 Maidenhead
notes
1774 Maidstone
notes
1816–1864 Manchester
notes
1768–1795 Sir Horatio Mann's XI
notes
1886 Lord March's XI
notes
1733–1892 Married XI (Married v Single matches)
notes
1777 Sir H. W. Marten's XI
notes
1753 Marylebone
notes
1913 J. R. Mason's XI
notes
1904–1937 MCC Australia XI
notes
1910–1931 MCC South African XI
notes
1935 MCC West Indies XI
notes
1791 MCC & Hertfordshire
notes
1804 MCC & Homerton
notes
1801–1807 T. Mellish's XI
notes
1780s Melton Mowbray
notes
1772–1789 Meopham
notes
1730–1863 Middlesex
notes
1733–1912 Middlesex & Surrey
notes
1896–1899 Midland Counties
notes
1912–1994 Minor Counties XI
notes
1707–1825 Mitcham
notes
1796–1813 Montpelier
notes
1796–1797 Montpelier Thursday
notes
1802 Montpelier Saturday
notes
1793 E. G. Morant's XI
notes
1787–1789 Moulsey Hurst
notes
1740 Moulsey & Richmond
notes

N[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1787–1789 N to Z Lord's Old Ground and Bourne Paddock 5 [31]
notes

See A to M entry above.

1862 New All England Eleven
notes
1862 New England Eleven
notes
1744–1745 Richard Newland's XI
notes
1793 R. Newman's XI
notes
1739 – Non-international England cricket teams ("All England", "The Rest", etc.) various many [32]
notes

Non-international England teams are often referred to simply as "England" or as "All England" but it must be noted that the term typically means "The Rest of England" (often abbreviated to "The Rest") vis-à-vis their opponents who might be MCC or a county club. There were specific variations on the "All England" theme, especially William Clarke's All-England Eleven (1846–1881), which was commonly known as the All-England Eleven or AEE. Others were the United All-England Eleven (UEE; 1852–1869), the United North of England Eleven (UNEE; 1870–1881) and the United South of England Eleven (USEE; 1865–1880).

1884 Non-smokers XI (Smokers v Non-smokers match)
notes
1764–1851 Norfolk
notes
1836–1961 North
notes
1741 Northamptonshire [10][12]
notes

First recorded as part of the combined Northants/Hunts team in two matches against Bedfordshire and then, shortly afterwards, singly against Buckinghamshire; the first Northants patron and county captain was George Montagu-Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax.

1771–1840 Nottingham
notes
1803 Nottingham & Leicester
notes
1829–1840 Nottinghamshire
notes
1883 Nottinghamshire & Lancashire
notes
1803 Nottinghamshire & Leicestershire
notes
1839 Nottinghamshire & Sussex
notes
1872–1883 Nottinghamshire & Yorkshire
notes

O[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1781 Odiham
notes
1791–1819 Old Etonians
notes
1881 Old Oxford University
notes
1793 Old Westminster
notes
1817 Old Wykehamists
notes
1878–1883 Orleans Club
notes
1811–1816 George Osbaldeston's XI
notes
1879–1937 Over 30 (Over 30 v Under 30 matches)
notes
1850 Over 36 (Under 36 v Over 36)
notes
1810 Over 38 (Over 38 v Under 38)
notes
1888–1899 Oxford University Past & Present
notes
1839–1911 Oxford & Cambridge Universities (see British Universities)
notes
1874–1893 Oxford and Cambridge Past & Present (see British Universities)
notes
1779–1781 Oxfordshire
notes

P[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1933–1935 L. Parkinson's XI
notes
1951–1978 T. N. Pearce's XI
notes
1724 Penshurst, Tonbridge & Wadhurst Penshurst Park 1 [33]
notes

A combination of three Kent village teams for a match against Dartford. No other instances have been discovered.

1776 Petersfield and Catherington
notes
1784–1845 Petworth
notes
1891 H. Philipson's XI
notes
1846 Fuller Pilch's XI
notes
1889 R. Pilling's XI
notes
1806–1962 Players
notes
1826–1892 Players of Kent
notes
1871–1887 Players of the North
notes
1842–1845 Players of Nottinghamshire
notes
1864–1920 Players of the South
notes
1845–1864 Players of Surrey
notes
1838–1880 Players of Sussex
notes
1741 Portsmouth unknown 1 [34]
notes

Opponents of Slindon in their first important match.

1788 Charles Powlett's XI
notes
1816–1818 Prince's Plain Club
notes
1730 Putney
notes

R[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1762 Rest of Surrey
notes
1702 1st Duke of Richmond's XI Goodwood 1 [9]
notes

Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond, is believed to have been active in cricket patronage for several years but the only match in which he is definitely known to have been involved was one against Arundel in 1702, which his team apparently won.

1725–1731 2nd Duke of Richmond's XI 12 [27]
notes

Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond, was a significant cricket patron, especially in his native Sussex, he ran his own team for many years and was later involved with Slindon.

1720–1805 Richmond
notes
1749 Richmond & Ripley
notes
1879 A. W. Ridley's XI
notes
1790–1870 Right-handed XI (Left-handed v Right-handed matches)
notes
1802 Ripley
notes
1775 Risborough
notes
1912–1913 L. Robinson's XI
notes
1800 Rochester
notes
1718–1719 Rochester Punch Club
notes
1764 Romford
notes
1922–1946 Royal Air Force ("RAF")
notes
1912–1929 Royal Navy ("Navy")
notes
1814 Rutland
notes

S[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1893 Second Class Counties
notes
1830 Seven Gentlemen with Four Players
notes
1731–1803 Sevenoaks Vine Cricket Ground, Sevenoaks 8 [35]
notes

May have been the "club equivalent" of the Duke of Dorset's XI when opposing another club (most often London) instead of another patron's XI.

1923 J. Sharp's XI
notes
1881–1885 Alfred Shaw's XI
notes
1757–1862 Sheffield
notes
1826 Sheffield & Leicester
notes
1881–1896 Lord Sheffield's XI
notes
1889–1891 M. Sherwin's XI
notes
1888–1893 A. Shrewsbury's XI
notes
1733–1892 Single XI (Married v Single matches)
notes
1830 Six Gentlemen with Five Players
notes
1741–1747 Slindon
notes
1840–1849 Slow bowlers XI (Fast v Slow matches)
notes
1787–1796 T. A. Smith's XI
notes
1884 Smokers XI (Smokers v Non-smokers match)
notes
1836–1961 South
notes
1912 South Wales
notes
1864–1868 Southgate
notes
1810–1814 St John's Wood
notes
1886–1890 Staffordshire England XI
notes
1724–1729 Edwin Stead's XI Dartford Brent 7 [25]
notes

Stead was a successful patron of Kent cricket in the 1720s and ran his own team as well as leading Kent county teams.

1895–1898 A. E. Stoddart's XI
notes
1800–1811 Storrington
notes
1832 Lord Strathavon's XI
notes
1783 Strood
notes
1731 Sudbury
notes
1764–1847 Suffolk
notes
1709–1845 Surrey
notes
1846–1873 Surrey Club
notes
1793–1900 Surrey & Sussex
notes
1729–1838 Sussex
notes

T[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1923–1926 L. H. Tennyson's XI
notes
1800 Thames Ditton
notes
1882–1929 C. I. Thornton's XI
notes
1795–1802 The Thursday Club
notes
1786 Thursley
notes
1723 Tonbridge venue unknown 1 [36]
notes

Tonbridge alone played Dartford in 1723 but combined with Penshurst and Wadhurst to play them in 1724.

1801 W. Turner's XI
notes
1790 Tunbridge Wells
notes
1798 John Tufton's XI
notes

U[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1923 Uncapped (Capped v Uncapped match at Hastings)
notes
1879–1937 Under 30 (Over 30 v Under 30 matches)
notes
1850 Under 36 (Under 36 v Over 36)
notes
1810 Under 38 (Over 38 v Under 38)
notes
1852–1869 United All-England Eleven
notes
1870–1881 United North of England Eleven
notes
1865–1880 United South of England Eleven
notes
1789 Uxbridge
notes

W[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1800 Ws & Hs with Lawrell
notes
1790 Wadhurst and Lamberhurst
notes
1866 R. D. Walker's XI
notes
1793 Tom Walker's XI
notes
1755–1791 Waltham
notes
1801 Waltham Abbey
notes
1799 Waltham & Hertfordshire
notes
1815–1825 William Ward's XI
notes
1786 Warfield
notes
1903–1938 P. F. Warner's XI
notes
c.1611 Weald and Upland unknown 1 [13]
notes

A team with this name took part in the world's earliest known organised match at Chevening, Kent against opponents called Chalkhill.

1885–1901 A. J. Webbe's XI
notes
1904–1914 G. J. V. Weigall's XI
notes
1896 Wembley Park
notes
1844–1948 West
notes
1705–1790 West Kent aka West of Kent Sevenoaks Vine 9 [26]
notes

Although sometimes correctly named "West Kent", some of the teams should more properly be called the Duke of Dorset's XI or S. Amherst's XI. Apart from early games against Chatham and Surrey, seven of the matches were between 1780 and 1790 against the East Kent equivalent managed by Sir Horatio (Horace) Mann and also called Sir Horatio Mann's XI.

1822 West Kent and Surrey
notes
1787 West Sussex
notes
1746–1752 Westminster
notes
1784–1788 White Conduit Club
notes
1799 R. Whitehead's XI
notes
1787–1797 Earl of Winchilsea's XI
notes
1785 Windsor
notes
1791 Windsor and Eton
notes
1788 Windsor Forest
notes
1757 Wirksworth
notes
1803 H. C. Woolridge's XI
notes
1754–1806 Woolwich
notes
1769 Wrotham
notes
1886 G. N. Wyatt's XI
notes

Y[edit]

known dates team name home or used venue total source
1799 Lord Yarmouth's XI
notes
1833–1862 Yorkshire Hyde Park and Bramall Lane many [37]
notes

Yorkshire was first used as a team name when Sheffield Cricket Club organised a match against Norfolk at Hyde Park from 2 to 5 September 1833. Most of Sheffield's matches were against other town clubs, notably Manchester and Nottingham, but they called themselves Yorkshire when facing county opposition; the first "Roses Match" against Lancashire took place on 23–25 July 1849, Yorkshire winning by 5 wickets.[38] Yorkshire County Cricket Club was formed on 8 January 1863 at a meeting of the Match Fund Committee which had been established two years earlier by the Sheffield club for the promotion of inter-county matches.[39]

1828 Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire & Leicestershire Darnall New Ground 1 [40]
notes

An ad hoc team which was formed to play one match only against All-England at Darnall on 8 to 10 September 1828, All-England winning by 242 runs; the match arose from a challenge made by William Woolhouse on behalf of the northern counties to the rest of England. It backfired as the combined team, which featured Tom Marsden, could manage only 92 runs in the entire match against the roundarm bowling of Jem Broadbridge and William Lillywhite, while Fuller Pilch scored 49 and 56 for a personal match total of 105.

References[edit]

  1. ^ ACS Guides
  2. ^ a b Haygarth, S&B volume 1, p. 67.
  3. ^ a b Haygarth, S&B volume 2, p. 152.
  4. ^ a b Haygarth, S&B volume 2, p. 213.
  5. ^ "A to M". CricketArchive.
  6. ^ Haygarth, S&B volume 1, pp. 77–91
  7. ^ ACS, Important Cricket Matches, p. 27.
  8. ^ Buckley, FL18C, p. 70.
  9. ^ a b McCann, p. 1.
  10. ^ a b c Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 27.
  11. ^ McCann, pp. 6–7.
  12. ^ a b Buckley, FL18C, p. 16.
  13. ^ a b Underdown, p. 4.
  14. ^ a b Waghorn, Dawn of Cricket, p. 4.
  15. ^ Buckley, FL18C, p. 62.
  16. ^ Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 53.
  17. ^ Waghorn, Dawn of Cricket, pp. 70–71 & 106–114.
  18. ^ Waghorn, Dawn of Cricket, p. 9.
  19. ^ Buckley, FL18C, p. 8.
  20. ^ Chelsea Common
  21. ^ Buckley, FL18C, p. 13.
  22. ^ Buckley, FLPVC, p. 22.
  23. ^ Maun, Volume One, p. 33.
  24. ^ Waghorn, pp. 5–6.
  25. ^ a b Waghorn, Dawn of Cricket, p. 5.
  26. ^ a b Haygarth, S&B volume 1, pp. 47–48.
  27. ^ a b McCann, p. 4.
  28. ^ a b c Waghorn, Dawn of Cricket, p. 7.
  29. ^ "A. E. R. Gilligan's XI". CricketArchive.
  30. ^ Waghorn, Dawn of Cricket, p. 6.
  31. ^ "N to Z". CricketArchive.
  32. ^ The earliest known use of the term was in 1739 as recorded in Waghorn, Cricket Scores, p. 23.
  33. ^ Maun, Volume One, p. 28.
  34. ^ McCann, p. 18.
  35. ^ Waghorn, Dawn of Cricket, p. 8.
  36. ^ Maun, Volume One, p. 27.
  37. ^ Haygarth, S&B volume 2, pp. 240–241.
  38. ^ Haygarth, S&B volume 4, p. 55.
  39. ^ Hodgson, p. 14.
  40. ^ Haygarth, S&B volume 2, pp. 67–68.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Ashley-Cooper, F. S. (1900). At the Sign of the Wicket: Cricket 1742–1751. Cricket magazine. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  • ACS (1981). A Guide to Important Cricket Matches Played in the British Isles 1709–1863. Nottingham: ACS.
  • ACS (1982). A Guide to First-Class Cricket Matches Played in the British Isles. Nottingham: ACS.
  • Buckley, G. B. (1937). Fresh Light on pre-Victorian Cricket. Cotterell.
  • Haygarth, Arthur (1862). Scores & Biographies, Volume 1 (1744–1826). Lillywhite.
  • Haygarth, Arthur (1862). Scores & Biographies, Volume 2 (1827–1840). Lillywhite.
  • Hodgson, Derek (1989). The Official History of Yorkshire County Cricket Club; the Crowood Press. ISBN 1-85223-274-9.
  • Maun, Ian (2009). From Commons to Lord's, Volume One: 1700 to 1750. Roger Heavens. ISBN 978 1 900592 52 9.
  • Maun, Ian (2011). From Commons to Lord's, Volume Two: 1751 to 1770. Martin Wilson. ISBN 978 0 9569066 0 1.
  • McCann, Tim (2004). Sussex Cricket in the Eighteenth Century. Sussex Record Society.
  • Underdown, David (2000). Start of Play. London: Allen Lane. ISBN 0-713-99330-8.
  • Waghorn, H. T. (1899). Cricket Scores, Notes, etc. (1730–1773). Blackwood.
  • Waghorn, H. T. (1906). The Dawn of Cricket. Electric Press.
  • Wilson, Martin (2005). An Index to Waghorn. Bodyline.