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List of monarchs of Persia

This article lists the monarchs of Persia from the establishment of the Median Empire by Medes around 705 BC until the deposition of the Pahlavi dynasty in 1979. Earlier monarchs in the area of modern-day Iran are listed in: List of rulers of the pre-Achaemenid kingdoms of IranMinor dynasties and vassal monarchs can be found in: List of rulers of Parthian sub-kingdoms Islamic dynasties of Iran Note: Ancient Persia is agreed to have ended with the collapse of the Achaemenid dynasty as a result of the Wars of Alexander the Great; the Fratarakas appear to have been Governors of the Seleucid Empire. The Seleucid dynasty lost control of Persia. In 253, the Arsacid dynasty established itself in Parthia; the Parthians expanded their control, until by the mid-2nd century BC, the Seleucids had lost control of Persia. Control of eastern territories was permanently lost by Antiochus VII in 129 BC. For more comprehensive lists of kings, sub-kings and sub-queens of this Era see: List of rulers of Parthian sub-kingdoms Note: Classical Persia is agreed to have ended with the collapse of the Sasanian Empire as a result of the Muslim conquest of Persia.

A Zoroastrian Persian dynasty that held power in the north for over a century before falling to the Abbasid Caliphate. For more comprehensive lists of kings and sub-kings of this Era see: Muslim dynasties of Iran For more comprehensive lists of kings and sub-kings of this Era see: Muslim dynasties of Iran For more comprehensive lists of kings and sub-kings of this Era see: Muslim dynasties of Iran For more comprehensive lists of kings and sub-kings of this Era see: Muslim dynasties of Iran For more comprehensive lists of kings and sub-kings of this Era see: Muslim dynasties of Iran For more comprehensive lists of kings and sub-kings of this Era see: Muslim dynasties of Iran The Buyid Kingdom was divided into a number of separate emirates, of which the most important were Fars and Iraq. One of the emirs held a sort of primus inter pares supremacy over the rest, which would be marked by titles like Amir al-umara and Shahanshah. For more comprehensive lists of kings and sub-kings of this Era see: Muslim dynasties of Iran For more comprehensive lists of kings and sub-kings of this Era see: Muslim dynasties of Iran An empire built from Khwarezm, covering part of Iran and neighbouring Central Asia.

For more comprehensive lists of kings and sub-kings of this Era see: Muslim dynasties of Iran For more comprehensive lists of kings and sub-kings of this Era see: Muslim dynasties of Iran For more comprehensive lists of kings and sub-kings of this Era see: Muslim dynasties of Iran Sources: Note: Medieval Persia is agreed to have ended with rise of the Safavid Empire Iranian monarchy Monarchism in Iran Supreme Leader of Iran History of Iran Persian Empire List of ancient Persians Shah Shahbanu

Edward Ssekandi

Edward Kiwanuka Ssekandi is a Ugandan politician and lawyer, Vice President of Uganda since 24 May 2011. Prior to that, he served as the Speaker of Parliament from 2001 to 2011, he has served as Member of Parliament for Bukoto County Central constituency since 1996. Ssekandi was born in Masaka District on 19 January 1942, he graduated with honors from the University of East Africa with a Bachelor of Laws degree. He holds a Diploma in Legal Practice from the Law Development Center in Kampala, Uganda's capital and largest city. From 1973 until 1978, he served as a lecturer at the Uganda Law Development Centre. Between 1978 and 1979, he served as the Acting Director of the Law Development Centre, he was the lead counsel on the Commission of Inquiry into Violations of Human Rights, between 1986 and 1993. He was a delegate to the Constitutional Assembly, which drafted the 1995 Ugandan constitution, from 1994 until 1995. In 1996, Edward Ssekandi was elected to the Ugandan Parliament to represent Bukoto County Central, located in Masaka District.

He was re-elected from that constituency in 2001, 2006 and 2011. He served as Deputy Speaker of Parliament from 1996 to 2001, he was elected as Speaker in 2001, a position he held until 2011. He was replaced as Speaker by Rebecca Kadaga, the first female Speaker of Parliament in Uganda's history, on 19 May 2011, he is married. He belongs to the National Resistance Movement political party, he is reported to be a sports enthusiast. Parliament of Uganda List of Speakers of the Parliament of Uganda Ssekandi To Run In 2016

Zhu Yihai

The Gengyin Emperor, personal name Zhu Yihai, was an emperor of the Southern Ming Dynasty, reigning from 1645 to 1655. He has no temple name. Zhu Yihai was born during the 46th year of the reign of Wanli Emperor of the Ming Dynasty, he was son of Zhu Shouyong, he was one of 9th-generation descendant of Zhu Tan, Prince Huang of Lu, 10th son of Hongwu Emperor. The mansion of Prince of Lu was located at Yanzhou; the Qing forces made the mansion collapsed. At that time, the peerage of Prince of Lu was succeeded by Zhu Yipai. After Qing came, Zhu Yipai committed suicide with his two another brothers, Zhu Yixing and Zhu Yijiang. After his brothers suicide, Zhu Yihai was enfeoffed as the 11th Prince of Lu by Chongzhen Emperor. After four days he succeeded his peerage, Li Zicheng attacked; the Prince of Lu was part of the resistance against the invading Qing dynasty forces. His primary consort, Lady Chen, committed suicide during the impending fall of the Ming; the location of her suicide can still be found on the island of Zhoushan.

In 1651 he fled to the island of Kinmen. His grave was discovered on the island in 1959, which disproved the theory advanced by the 18th-century History of Ming that he was killed by Koxinga, his eldest son, Zhu Honghuan, married the fourth daughter of Koxinga and went to live in the Kingdom of Tungning Taiwan under the protection of Zheng Jing, his brother-in-law and worked as a farmer. Another Ming Prince who accompanied Koxinga to Taiwan was the Prince of Ningjing Zhu Shugui. After the surrender of the Kingdom of Tungning, the Qing sent the 17 Ming princes still living on Taiwan back to mainland China where they spent the rest of their lives. Including Zhu Honghuan; the Pacification of Taiwan by the Great Qing