Listed buildings in Rockcliffe, Cumbria

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Rockcliffe is a civil parish in the Carlisle district of Cumbria, England, it contains 16 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, two are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade; the parish contains the villages of Rockcliffe and Harker, and the surrounding countryside. The listed buildings include houses and associated structures, farmhouses and farm buildings, a church with a mediaeval cross in the churchyard, a public house, and a milestone.

Key[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX
Grade Criteria[1]
I Buildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

Buildings[edit]

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Churchyard cross
54°56′42″N 3°00′09″W / 54.94505°N 3.00237°W / 54.94505; -3.00237 (Churchyard cross)
The Parish Church of St Mary the Virgin, Rockcliffe and Cargo, Stone cross (geograph 2183686).jpg
10th century The cross is in the churchyard of St Mary's Church. It is in calciferous sandstone and is very weathered; the cross consists of a shaft with two broad bands, and is decorated with dragons and interlace, and at the top is a wheel-head cross. The cross is also a Scheduled Monument.[2][3][4] I
The Old Hall
54°56′53″N 3°00′34″W / 54.94793°N 3.00940°W / 54.94793; -3.00940 (The Old Hall)
c. 1730 The house was extended and altered in the 20th century. It is rendered, with stone dressings, a moulded cornice, and a green slate roof with coped gables. There are two storeys and three bays, and a two-storey three-bay extension to the right; the round-headed doorway has a moulded surround with springers, a false keystone, and a radial fanlight. The windows in the original part are sashes with moulded stone sills, and in the extension they are casements with wooden surrounds.[5] II
Harker Lodge and outbuildings
54°56′17″N 2°56′45″W / 54.93801°N 2.94572°W / 54.93801; -2.94572 (Harker Lodge)
Mid 18th century A brick house on a chamfered stone plinth, with quoins, a string course, a moulded wooden eaves cornice with wooden modillions, and a hipped Welsh slate roof. There are two storeys and five bays. At the entrance are four Tuscan columns, with a moulded and ornamented entablature; the windows are sashes with flat brick arches and stone sills. Flanking the house are outbuildings that have gable ends forming pedimented pavilions. Behind the house is an earlier two-storey three-bay house.[6] II
Town Head
54°56′39″N 3°00′00″W / 54.94413°N 3.00012°W / 54.94413; -3.00012 (Town Head)
Mid 18th century A stuccoed house on a chamfered stone plinth, with stone dressings, quoins, a modillioned cornice with a parapet, and a slate roof. There are three storeys and three bays; the doorway is flanked by engaged Doric columns, and has a block entablature, an open moulded pediment, and a radial fanlight. The windows in the lower two floors are sashes in moulded surrounds, and in the top floor they are casements. In the roof is a gabled door.[7] II
Garristown and outbuildings
54°58′12″N 3°00′52″W / 54.96995°N 3.01436°W / 54.96995; -3.01436 (Garristown)
Late 18th century The farmhouse and outbuildings are in brick with a Welsh slate roof, and have two storeys. The house has three bays, the extension to the right has three bays, and an outbuilding further to the right also has three bays; the doorway has an alternate block surround, and the windows are sashes. In the outbuilding are two entrances with segmental heads, and ventilation slits.[8] II
Milestone
54°56′25″N 2°56′39″W / 54.94037°N 2.94427°W / 54.94037; -2.94427 (Milestone)
1793 (probable) The milestone was provided for the Carlisle to Longtown Turnpike. It is in sandstone with a rounded top, and carries a recessed circular cast iron plate inscribed with the distance in miles to Carlisle.[9] II
Becklands
54°56′35″N 2°59′41″W / 54.94312°N 2.99471°W / 54.94312; -2.99471 (Becklands)
Late 18th or early 19th century A former farmhouse in brick that has a slate roof with coped gables. There are two storeys, three bays, and a two-storey two-bay extension; the doorway has a surround of pilaster strips, an open moulded pediment, and a radial fanlight. The windows are sashes with flat brick arches and stone sills.[10] II
Castletown
54°56′57″N 3°01′10″W / 54.94918°N 3.01943°W / 54.94918; -3.01943 (Castletown)
1809–11 A country house that was extended and turned round in 1851–52. It is in calciferous sandstone on a chamfered plinth, and has angle pilaster strips, a moulded cornice, a parapet, and a hipped green slate roof; the main part has two storeys and five bays, with flanking pedimented wings of two storeys and two bays. To the right are extensions of two storeys and one bay, and of one storey and three bays. On the garden front is a stepped tetrastyle portico with square columns, a moulded cornice, and a cast iron balcony; the doorway has a round-headed patterned fanlight, the windows in the ground floor are casements, and elsewhere they are sashes. The rear entrance is flanked by two Doric columns.[11][12] II*
Gates, piers and walls, Castletown
54°57′00″N 3°00′55″W / 54.95000°N 3.01533°W / 54.95000; -3.01533 (Gates, piers and walls, Castletown)
1811 (probable) Around the entrance to the drive are six stone piers with vase finials. On each side of the drive, these are joined by serpentine shaped sandstone walls with cast iron speared railings; the gates are re-set on steel pillars behind the original piers.[13] II
Lodge, Castletown
54°56′59″N 3°00′56″W / 54.94967°N 3.01556°W / 54.94967; -3.01556 (Lodge, Castletown)
1811 (probable) The lodge is in calciferous sandstone on a chamfered plinth, and has quoins and a slate roof. There is a single storey and two bays. On the front is a tetrastyle pedimented portico with squared columns, and a moulded entablature with a carved coat of arms. Above the door is a fanlight, and the windows are sashes with pilaster strip surrounds.[14] II
Crown and Thistle Public House
54°56′39″N 3°00′05″W / 54.94428°N 3.00126°W / 54.94428; -3.00126 (Crown and Thistle Public House)
Crown and Thistle, Rockcliffe.jpg
Early 19th century The public house was extended in the 20th century; it is stuccoed and has a Welsh slate roof. There are two storeys and three bays, a single-storey two-bay extension to the left, and a two-storey two-bay landlord's house to the right. Both the original part and the extension have brick porches and sash windows; the landlord's house has a doorway with a stone surround, sash windows, and gabled dormers.[15] II
Floriston Rigg, outbuildings and
gin gang
54°58′06″N 3°00′09″W / 54.96827°N 3.00259°W / 54.96827; -3.00259 (Floriston Rigg)
Early 19th century The farmhouse and outbuildings are in sandstone with Welsh slate roofs. The farmhouse has two storeys and three bays, and a doorway and sash windows with stone surrounds. To the right is a two-storey two-bay outbuilding with a hipped roof. To the left, giving an L-shaped plan, is another two-storey outbuilding containing plank doors and ventilation slits. To the left of this is a lean-to single-storey gin gang with a hipped roof.[16] II
Garden Cottage
54°56′19″N 2°56′49″W / 54.93856°N 2.94687°W / 54.93856; -2.94687 (Garden Cottage)
Early 19th century Originally a gardener's cottage for Harker Lodge, it has rendered walls and a Welsh slate roof. There is one storey and three bays; the doorway has a stone surround, a moulded cornice, and a fanlight, and the windows are sashes with stone sills.[17] II
Garden wall, Harker Lodge
54°56′19″N 2°56′51″W / 54.93864°N 2.94762°W / 54.93864; -2.94762 (Garden wall, Harker Lodge)
Early 19th century This is a high wall enclosing the garden of Harker Lodge on two sides. It is in brick and has stone coping.[18] II
Harker Farmhouse
54°56′20″N 2°56′48″W / 54.93879°N 2.94669°W / 54.93879; -2.94669 (Harker Farmhouse)
Early 19th century A brick house with a Welsh slate roof, in two storeys and three bays. Above the door is a fanlight; the doorway and sash windows have plain surrounds and hood moulds.[19] II
St Mary's Church
54°56′43″N 3°00′09″W / 54.94532°N 3.00249°W / 54.94532; -3.00249 (St Mary's Church)
St Mary, Rockcliffe Geograph-1865973-by-Colin-Kinnear.jpg
1848 The church, designed by James Steward, is in Decorated style. The spire was completed in 1881, and was rebuilt in 1901 following a lightning strike; the church is built in calciferous sandstone on a chamfered plinth, and has angle buttresses, string courses, a decorated cornice, and a green slate roof with coped gables and cross finials. It consists of a nave with a north transept (originally a family chapel), a chancel, and a southwest steeple incorporating a porch; the tower is in three stages, and has an entrance with a pointed arch and a moulded surround, and a broach spire with lucarnes and a weathervane.[2][20] II*

Citations[edit]

Sources[edit]