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Little Flock, Arkansas

Little Flock is a city in Benton County, United States. The population was 2,585 at the 2010 census, it is a rural community known as one of the safest cities in Arkansas. It is AR-MO Metropolitan Statistical Area. Little Flock is located at 36°23′17″N 94°8′12″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.6 square miles, all land. As of the census of 2010, there were 2,585 people, in 1,126 households with 99.0% of the population in households. The racial makeup of the population was 76.1% non-Hispanic white, 2.5% black or African American, 1.9% Native American, 4.3% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 0.1% non-Hispanic from some other race, 3.5% from two or more races and 12.3% Hispanic or Latino. In 2000 there were 1,016 households, 685 families residing in the city; the population density was 341.9 people per square mile. There were 1,083 housing units at an average density of 143.3/sq mi. The racial makeup of the city was 83.21% White, 0.89% Black or African American, 1.70% Native American, 5.65% Asian, 0.43% Pacific Islander, 5.88% from other races, 2.24% from two or more races.

15.98 % of the population were Latino of any race. There were 1,016 households out of which 37.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.5% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.4% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.06. In the city, the population was spread out with 27.7% under the age of 18, 16.3% from 18 to 24, 33.2% from 25 to 44, 16.5% from 45 to 64, 6.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females, there were 109.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 107.1 males. The median income for a household in the city was $32,768, the median income for a family was $38,456. Males had a median income of $28,661 versus $21,708 for females; the per capita income for the city was $16,447. About 10.2% of families and 13.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.4% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.

Public education for elementary and secondary students is provided by Bentonville School District, which leads to graduation from Bentonville High School

Vancouver Dodgeball League

The Vancouver Dodgeball League is a non-profit organization, founded on February 11, 2005, on the idea that dodgeball could build a positive community. The League's dedicated commission is to promote the sport of dodgeball and build a vibrant community in the Greater Vancouver area. VDL is Vancouver’s first and only non-profit dodgeball organization. VDL’s mission is to advance dodgeball in Vancouver and build a community that’s based on fun, fitness and spirit. VDL is governed by a board of directors, all revenues go back to supporting this mission. VDL has a tier system that caters to competitive play. There are three tiers per division, according to the competitiveness of the team. At the end of the season, teams are divided into six tiers for playoffs, depending on their cumulative performance. In addition to league play, each season has an exhibition night, skills clinic, skills competition, pub night, playoffs, they organize tournaments sponsoring various charitable causes. Founded in 2004 by Kevin Bao, VDL began by hosting various drop-in tournaments.

Twelve players attended the first drop-in night, a few months that number swelled up to 120 players playing in tournaments. With a founding team consisting of Keith Bao, Truong Cao, Amy Chin, Jason Chow, Eddie Lee, VDL began offering league play in Spring 2006, which became a permanent home for avid dodgeball players. VDL has now grown into the largest dodgeball league in Metro Vancouver, played across 4 nights a week including a subsidiary league in Coquitlam, with over 200 teams and 1,500 players. Vancouver Dodgeball League Official Page The Courier Georgia Straight Article: League draws hundreds to dodge the inevitable

2017 TCR BeNeLux Touring Car Championship

The 2017 TCR Benelux Touring Car Championship was the second season of the TCR Benelux Touring Car Championship. The season ended on 22 October at Assen. Stéphane Lémeret entered the season as the defending champion. Michelin is the official tyre supplier; the 2017 schedule again consists of six rounds in the Benelux region, across Belgium and Netherlands. The round held in Luxembourg at the Circuit Goodyear did not return; each round includes a qualifying session and five races: a 60-minute-long qualifying race with a mandatory driver change, four 20-minute-long sprint races. The starting grid for the qualifying race will no longer be established by a popular vote via Facebook, through the Making the Grid application, but will be determined by a traditional qualifying session. Race 1 uses the fastest lap of after the pit stop during the qualifying race to determine the starting grid. Race 3 uses the fastest lap of. Races 2 and 4 include a rolling start using the finishing order of Race 1 and 3; the calendar was announced on 25 September 2016 revised on 15 December 2016.

All races will be run together with Clio Cup Benelux in separate classifications. Rounds 2, 4 and 6 are co-headlined by the Prototype Challenge. In sprint races both the competing driver and the co-driver, not competing score points. In contrast to the overall Drivers' championship only the driver competing scores points in sprint races. Points toward the Teams' championship are only awarded in the qualifying race. Points toward the Cars' championship are only awarded in the sprint races. TCR Benelux Touring Car Championship Official website

Knowles, Oklahoma

Knowles is a town in Beaver County, United States. The population was 11 at the 2010 census. Knowles is located at 36°52′25″N 100°11′34″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.2 square miles, all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 32 people, 10 households, 8 families residing in the town; the population density was 180.4 people per square mile. There were 11 housing units at an average density of 62.0 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 90.62 % 9.38 % from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 25.00% of the population. There were 10 households out of which 50.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.0% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 20.0% were non-families. 20.0% of all households were made up of individuals and none had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.20 and the average family size was 3.75.

In the town, the population was spread out with 37.5% under the age of 18, 18.8% from 18 to 24, 9.4% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, 9.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.8 males. The median income for a household in the town was $24,583, the median income for a family was $43,750. Males had a median income of $25,000 versus $20,833 for females; the per capita income for the town was $11,887. There were 33.3% of families and 43.5% of the population living below the poverty line, including 62.5% of those under 18 and none of those over 64

Theo Sauder

Theo Sauder is a Canadian rugby union player that plays fullback and fly-half. He plays for the Toronto Arrows in Major League Rugby. Sauder attended St. George's School. After graduating from St. George's he attended University of British Columbia for his university studies. In 2015 Sauder played for Canada U20 at the 2015 World Rugby Under 20 Trophy, he played for the Canada U20s again in 2016 but lost to United States U20 19-18 in the qualifier for the 2016 World Rugby Under 20 Trophy, therefore he did not get the play in the tournament that year. Sauder made his international debut for Canada on 9 June 2018 against Scotland, he came off the bench as a substitute in the 55th minute. Sauder scored his first points for the national team in a 65-19 win over Kenya in the first match of the 2019 Rugby World Cup Qualifying Repechage Tournament, he scored a conversion. On 6 November 2018, Sauder signed with the Toronto Arrows ahead of their 2019 debut season in Major League Rugby. On 27 September 2019, he was included in the Canadian squad for the 2019 Rugby World Cup as an injury replacement to Ben LeSage

James Trousdale

James Trousdale was a Captain in the American Revolution. And father of William Trousdale, Governor of Tennessee, he was the son of Elizabeth Trousdale, who were born in Ulster Province, Ireland. With his second wife and children, he accompanied his parents from Pennsylvania to Orange County, North Carolina, settling on the Haw River. James Trousdale's first recorded grant of land was by the State, 200 acres on the waters of Haw Creek, south of Hawfields, 3 Sep 1779. James Trousdale was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, he was a captain in North Carolina Militia, 1780-1781. He commanded a company under General Francis Marion of North Carolina patriots, he and his company were with George Washington at the Siege of Yorktown for the surrender of Cornwallis, 19 Oct 1781. It is believed that James was an unnamed member of the ill-fated rebels at the Battle of Alamance on 16 May 1771. In the Revolution, he began his active military service as a captain in 1779 and commanded at least three companies.

In February 1781, under Nathaniel Green, he was sent to oppose Cornwallis' army in the Battle of Guilford Court House. Following Green's withdrawal the North Carolina Council Extraordinary, in a questionable manner, sentenced "all those who had fled from Guilford to 12 months service as Continentals.". On recovery from his wound Captain Trousdale was given command of one of those reformed "Continental" units Part of this service includes "six months guarding the jail at Hillsboro". For his services during the American Revolution, James Trousdale obtained from North Carolina, a grant for 640 acres of land situated in what was Davidson County, now Sumner County, Tennessee; this land was paid for in scrip or certificates issued by North Carolina. James Trousdale moved from North Carolina and settled on this tract of land in 1796; the land was covered by a dense forest. Here he began to cultivate the soil. But, on the 6th of November, 1801, the Legislature of Tennessee appointed commissioners to select and purchase land upon which to lay out a town to be named Gallatin, to be the county seat of Sumner County.

The commissioners selected the farm of Captain James Trousdale, the town of Gallatin, TN now stands upon the old Trousdale farm. In 1802 the land for the county seat was purchased from James Trousdale. To honor the Trousdale military history, a monument was placed on the front lawn of Trousdale Place, a home built c. 1813 on the original property owned by Captain James Trousdale. The home is on the National List of Historic Places, he married first Elizabeth Ferguson by whom he had 5 children: John, Ann and Elizabeth. She died in 1774, he married his second wife, Elizabeth Dobbins, a member of a prominent family in North Carolina, in 1775. They had James who married Malinda May, he died in 1818 in Gallatin, TN