Lotha language

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Lotha
Native toIndia
RegionWokha district, Nagaland
EthnicityLotha Naga
Native speakers
179,467 (2001 census)[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3njh
Glottologloth1237[2]

The Lotha language is a Sino-Tibetan language spoken by approximately 180,000 people in Wokha district of west-central Nagaland. It is centered in the small district of Wokha (capital Wokha); this district has more than 114 villages such as Pangti, Maraju (Merapani), Englan, Baghty (Pakti) and others, where the language is widely spoken and studied.

Names[edit]

Alternate names include Chizima, Choimi, Hlota, Kyong, Lhota, Lotha, Lutha, Miklai, Tsindir, and Tsontsii (Ethnologue).

Dialects[edit]

Ethnologue lists the following dialects of Lotha.

  • Live
  • Tsontsu
  • Ndreng
  • Kyong
  • Kyo
  • Kyon
  • Kyou

In the Linguistic Survey of India, linguist George Abraham Grierson analyzed various branches of languages in India and categorized various Naga languages into three groups: Western Naga, Eastern Naga, and Central Naga.[3] Lotha falls into the Central Naga group, which also includes the languages Ao, Sangtam, and Yimchungru.[3]

Orthography and literature[edit]

Lotha is written in the Latin script, introduced by the British and American missionaries in the late 19th century, it is a medium of education up to the post-graduate level in the state of Nagaland. It is also the language in which the church sermons are preached; the Bible has been translated into the Lotha language, adding significantly to its vocabulary, which had an influence of Assamese and [[Hindi].

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Statement 1: Abstract of speakers' strength of languages and mother tongues - 2011". www.censusindia.gov.in. Office of the Registrar General & Census Commissioner, India. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Lotha Naga". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  3. ^ a b Kumar, Braj Bihari (1 January 2005). Naga Identity. Concept Publishing Company. p. 75. ISBN 978-81-8069-192-8.

External links[edit]