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Madison County, Arkansas

Madison County is a county located in the U. S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15,717; the county seat is Huntsville. The county was formed on September 30, 1836, named for James Madison, fourth President of the United States. Madison County is part of the Northwest Arkansas region. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 837 square miles, of which 834 square miles is land and 2.8 square miles is water. Carroll County Newton County Johnson County Franklin County Crawford County Washington County Benton County Ozark National Forest As of the 2000 census, there were 14,243 people, 5,463 households, 4,080 families residing in the county; the population density was 7/km². There were 6,537 housing units at an average density of 3/km²; the racial makeup of the county was 95.94% White, 0.11% Black or African American, 1.22% Native American, 0.06% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 1.47% from other races, 1.10% from two or more races. 3.06 % of the population were Latino of any race.

There were 5,463 households out of which 33.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.00% were married couples living together, 7.90% had a female householder with no husband present, 25.30% were non-families. 22.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.40% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.03. In the county, the population was spread out with 26.80% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 27.00% from 25 to 44, 24.30% from 45 to 64, 14.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.30 males. The median income for a household in the county was $27,895, the median income for a family was $32,910. Males had a median income of $24,911 versus $18,786 for females; the per capita income for the county was $14,736. About 14.70% of families and 18.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.60% of those under age 18 and 18.00% of those age 65 or over.

During the Secession Convention of 1861, Arkansas voted to leave the Union and join the Confederate States of America. When Chairman David Walker called for a second vote seeking a unanimous decision, only Madison County representative Isaac Murphy refused to change his vote. Murphy would be appointed Governor of Arkansas during Reconstruction under Abraham Lincoln's conciliatory policy. Madison County is Republican, voted for the Republican candidate several times when Arkansas was part of the "Solid South". U. S. Highway 412 Highway 12 Highway 16 Highway 21 Highway 23 Highway 45 Highway 74 The Huntsville Municipal Airport is a public-use airport located two nautical miles southwest of the central business district of Huntsville. Huntsville Hindsville St. Paul Townships in Arkansas are the divisions of a county; each township includes unincorporated areas. Arkansas townships have limited purposes in modern times. However, the United States Census does list Arkansas population based on townships.

Townships are of value for historical purposes in terms of genealogical research. Each town or city is within one or more townships in an Arkansas county based on census maps and publications; the townships of Madison County are listed below. Orval E. Faubus, governor of Arkansas during the desegregation days, was from the Combs community near Huntsville, he is buried in Combs Cemetery. Ronnie Hawkins, rockabilly singer, his backing band, The Hawks played with Bob Dylan and became The Band. Danny L. Patrick, Republican member of the Arkansas House of Representatives from Madison and Carroll counties from 1967 to 1970. John Selman and lawman, best known for killing John Wesley Hardin in 1895, was born in Madison County. List of lakes in Madison County, Arkansas National Register of Historic Places listings in Madison County, Arkansas Madison County Map Official Site

Swerea

Swerea is a Swedish research group specialising in applied scientific research in materials development and product development. The group operates in Sweden for industry with operations in Sweden, but owns the Corrosion Institute in France; the Swerea group consists of five research institutes: Swerea IVF, Swerea KIMAB, Swerea MEFOS, Swerea SWECAST and Swerea SICOMP. Office locations were Kista, Luleå, Piteå, Mölndal, Jönköping, Linköping, Trollhättan, Oslo, St Etienne och Brest. October 1st 2018 Research Institutes of Sweden acquired two-thirds of the research group, including Swerea IVF, Swerea SICOMP, Swerea SWECAST and the corrosion area of Swerea KIMAB; these companies now make up the RISE division Materials and Production and has subsequently changed name to RISE IVF, RISE SICOMP, RISE SWECAST and RISE KIMAB. MEFOS and the remaining part of Swerea KIMAB launched a new research institute, with a focus on mining, mineral and metal research owned by RISE. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden is now the sole owner of Swerea AB who in turn owns the companies Swerea IVF, Swerea SICOMP, Swerea SWECAST and Swerea KIMAB.

RISE operates under the Ministry of Innovation. During the beginning and mid 20th century Swedish industry prospered. A a result of the blooming years a number of research institutes were formed to ensure further development; the first was the Metallographic Institute, founded in 1921 by director and physicist Carl Benedicks. The institute was to go through many name mergers. From The Metallographic institute to The Institute for metal research to Swerea KIMAB, when it merged with the Corrosion Institute in 2005/2006 and became a part of the Swerea group; the Institute for Engineering Technology and The Swedish Foundry Association were formed during those good years. The Swedish Foundry Association split into one research institute, Swerea SWECAST, one trade association that kept the original name; when industry development and economy experienced a dip in the late 20th century, SICOMP was founded, in 1988, in order to strengthen competition through contributing with more advanced knowledge and research on composite material.

SICOMP became Swerea SICOMP, a part of the Swerea group, when Swerea was founded in 2005. October 1st 2018 two thirds of the Swerea group became RISE Research Institutes of Sweden; the remaining part formed Swerim. Swerea research focus on production development and product development; the research group takes part in international research efforts such as CleanSky, STEPWISE, Fire-resist, Biobased Industries etcetera

SS Richard Bland

SS Richard Bland was a Liberty ship built in the United States during World War II. She was named after an American planter and statesman from Virginia, he served for many terms in the House of Burgesses, was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1774 and 1775, is considered a Founding Fathers of the United States. Richard Bland was laid down on 29 October 1941, under a Maritime Commission contract, MCE hull 28, by the Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyard, Maryland, she was allocated to American South African Lines, Inc. on 17 April 1942. Richard Bland had set out from Murmansk, on 1 March 1943, for Loch Ewe, with 4,000 LT of lumber, in Convoy RA 53. At 09:26, on the morning of 5 March 1943, Richard Bland was struck by a torpedo from a spread of three fired from the German submarine U-255, at 72°44′N 11°27′E; the merchant ship SS Executive was sunk while one of the torpedo struck Richard Bland on the starboard side at hold #1, passing through without exploding. This created two eight ft holes on either side of the ship causing the deck to crack and the collision bulkhead to rupture.

The forepeak tank flooded and the ship to began to list to starboard, but she remained in the convoy at only a reduced speed. On the night of 6 March, she was forced from the convoy because of rough seas, she proceeded by herself to Iceland. At 16:36, on 10 March, U-255 once again fired a spread of three torpedoes at Richard Bland with only one sticking her on her port side at the fireroom; this caused the ship soon broke in two just forward of the bridge. The captain, Lawrence Dodd, ordered four crewmen into each of two lifeboats to be launched, but not released, until the abandon ship order was given; when attempting to pass the boats to the other side of Richard Bland the ropes broke and they drifted astern. U-255 missed. At 21:07, U-255 struck the stern section at 66°53′N 14°10′W which sank at 22:03; the rest of the crew of nine officers, 32 crewmen and 28 Armed guards were forced to abandon ship in the two remaining lifeboats. Due to the boats being overcrowded and rough seas, men that had to cling to the sides of the boats lost strength and drowned, while the boat that the captain was on was believed to have been swamped and not seen again.

HMS Impulsive was able to pick up 27 survivors in the remaining lifeboat on 11 March, with the two lifeboats, containing 4 crewmen each, being picked up in the morning. The captain, along with five officers, 13 crewmen, 15 Armed guards were lost; the forward section was taken in tow and brought to Akureyri, were she was declared a Constructive Total Loss

Rosebud, Missouri

Rosebud is a city in Gasconade County, United States. The population was 409 at the 2010 census. Rosebud is located at 38°23′12″N 91°24′7″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.87 square miles, all land. As of the census of 2010, there were 409 people, 179 households, 107 families living in the city; the population density was 470.1 inhabitants per square mile. There were 197 housing units at an average density of 226.4 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 97.1% White, 0.2% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 0.5% from other races, 1.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.7% of the population. There were 179 households 26.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.5% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.2% had a male householder with no wife present, 40.2% were non-families. 34.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.1% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older.

The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.88. The median age in the city was 43.2 years. 22.7% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 52.6 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 364 people, 155 households, 103 families living in the city; the population density was 1,119.4 people per square mile. There were 165 housing units at an average density of 507.4 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 97.53% White, 0.27% African American, 2.20% from two or more races. There were 155 households out of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.5% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.5% were non-families. 32.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.4% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.88. In the city the population was spread out with 25.8% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 17.9% from 45 to 64, 19.0% who were 65 years of age or older.

The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.1 males. The median income for a household in the city was $29,688, the median income for a family was $33,750. Males had a median income of $24,766 versus $17,857 for females; the per capita income for the city was $18,513. About 13.5% of families and 23.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.2% of those under age 18 and 16.4% of those age 65 or over

Woodberry-Quarrels House

The Woodberry-Quarrels House is a historic First Period house at 180 Bridge Street in Hamilton, Massachusetts. The oldest part of this 2.5 story, seven bay wood frame house is the central doorway and the rooms to its right, which were built c. 1690 along with a central chimney, removed during Federal-period alterations. In the First Period rooms to the left of the entry were added, there have been a series of alterations and additions since then; the First Period core of the house survived the major Federal-era changes, the house retains much decorative work from that period. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990. List of the oldest buildings in the United States National Register of Historic Places listings in Essex County, Massachusetts

Greenwich station (Metro-North)

The Greenwich station is a commuter rail stop on the Metro-North Railroad's New Haven Line in Greenwich, Connecticut. It is the first/last stop for some express trains that originate/terminate at South Norwalk, New Haven–Union Station or New Haven–State Street. Unlike most station on the line, Greenwich station is owned and maintained by multiple agencies and organizations; the State of Connecticut owns the station's platforms, Metro-North maintains the platforms, but the station building and parking facilities are owned. As of August 2006, weekday commuter ridership was 2,804, there are 1,274 parking spots; the Penn Central Transportation Company opened the current station building on March 5, 1970, replacing an older structure, demolished. As built the new building was a two-story structure with 8,550-square-foot of space; the station was the centerpiece of a new mixed-use retail development. A proposed $45 million project, of which plans were shown in July 2019, would replace that building with a new station on the south side of the tracks.

This station has two high-level side platforms, each 10 cars long. Jenkins, Stephen; the Story of the Bronx from the Purchase Made by the Dutch from the Indians in 1639 to the Present Day. New York, New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons. Retrieved December 12, 2019. Metro-North Railroad - Greenwich List of upcoming train departure times and track assignments from MTA http://www.ct.gov/dot/lib/dot/documents/dpt/1_Station_Inspection_Summary_Report.pdf