Mano (singer)

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Mano
Playback singer Mano.JPG
Background information
Birth nameNagoor Babu
BornSattenapalli, Andhra Pradesh, India
Genresplayback singing, carnatic music
Occupation(s)Singer, Actor, Producer, voice dubbing,
InstrumentsVocalist
Years active1984 – Present.

Nagoor Babu, known by his stage name Mano, is an Indian playback singer, voice-over artist, actor, producer, television anchor and music composer. He is a recipient of several awards such as the Nandi Awards from the Government of Andhra Pradesh and Kalaimamani award from the Government of Tamil Nadu.

Mano has recorded 30,000 songs for various Tamil, Telugu, Bengali, Kannada, Malayalam, Oriya and Bollywood films,[1] he has also performed for over 3000 live concerts across the continents.[2] Notably, he has recorded 2,000 songs for music director Ilayaraja.

Early life and background[edit]

Mano was born as Nagoor Babu in tenali, Guntur district of Andhra Pradesh state, his father Rasool, was a musician in the All India Radio, Vijayawada division and his mother Shaheeda, was a popular Stage actress. Inspired heavily by his mother, Mano joined the stage theater and played many historical characters which also involved singing live songs in his own voice, he soon started taking formal training of carnatic classical music under the vocalist Nedunuri Krishnamurthy. Subsequently, he started his film acting career in the late 1970s and acted in about 40 movies as child artist, he featured as a supporting character in films such as Rangoon Rowdy.

Statistics[edit]

Mano has sung almost 35,000 songs in 15 languages such as Tamil, Telugu, Oriya, Malayalam, Kannada and Hindi.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

Early days and debut[edit]

Mano

While in 1979, Mano was shooting for a Telugu film for which the veteran M. S. Viswanathan was the music composer, it so happened that the original singer S. P. Balasubramanyam who was supposed to sing a song could not show up to the recording studio. Accidentally, Mano was asked to show his singing skills by the composer's assistant who was a good friend of Mano's father. Mano rendered a few of the Ghazal songs much to the appreciation of audience present there and the composer himself. From then on, Mano was signed by Viswanathan to sing few track songs upon which the main singer would sing in the final version. In 1982, Mano approached the famous composer Chakravarthy seeking a chance for his brother who was upcoming as a Tabla player. However, Chakravarthy insisted that he wanted an assistant like him to sing track songs. Mano, joined his troop and assisted for almost 2 years. In his tenure with Chakravarthy, Mano sang over 2000 tracks for almost all the leading singers.

Name change and association with Ilaiyaraaja[edit]

Before beginning his long standing career with Ilaiyaraaja, Nagoor Babu was rechristened as "Mano" to avoid clash of names with the already established singer Nagore E. M. Hanifa. The name was selected and christened by Ilaiyaraaja himself in his first song "Annae Annae nee enna sonnae" in the Tamil film Fazil's "Poo Vizhi vaasalilae" title song. Mano went on to record many memorable songs under the same composer for his Tamil and Telugu films. In 1987, Mano got a big break by singing popular songs for the film Enga Ooru Pattukkaran; the songs "Shenbagame Shenbagame" and "Madhura Marikozhundu Vasam" became instant hits among the listeners. However, he also faced criticism from the critics who dubbed that his voice was an absolute clone to S. P. Balasubramanyam. Taking the criticism in his stride, Mano went on recording as many as 500 successful songs with Ilaiyaraaja and slowly branched out to sing for other Tamil composers as well,[3] he recorded maximum number of duet songs with K. S. Chithra, Swarnalatha and S. Janaki. He simultaneously sang many hundreds of songs in Tamil, Telugu and Kannada film industries, his teaming up with Hamsalekha in Kannada produced many chart buster numbers which are considered evergreen. His few Malayalam, Hindi and Oriya songs also were well received.

Voice modulation and its success[edit]

The early 1990s saw Mano experimenting with his voice through some modulations and it indeed worked in his favor to silence his critics. In 1994, he was approached by A. R. Rahman to sing a duet song "Mukkabla" with Swarnalatha for the movie Kadhalan. Mano was asked to sing in a very different style by the composer and he recorded his voice which was inspired by R. D. Burman's voice in "Mehbooba Mehbooba" song. The song went on to become a huge blockbuster which broke all the regional barriers and reached out to the entire country, he recorded the same song in the Telugu and Hindi versions which also were well received. Following this stupendous success in experimentation, many music directors cashed in his newfound fame and made him sing in the same style; some of the songs he modulated his voice for are "Aye Shabba Aye Shabba" for Vidyasagar's Karna, "I Love You" and "Azhagiya Laila" for Sirpy's Ullathai Allitha and "Thillana Thillana" for Rahman's Muthu. He has also done a few semi-classical numbers such as Athma Varaiyo, he has also sung a few Hindi film songs for Gulshan Kumar in Aaya Sanam, Aaja Meri Jaan, Kasam Theri Kasam, and Chor Aur Chand.

Voice-over dubbing[edit]

The 2000s also saw another face of Mano as the voice-over dubbing artist in the Telugu film industry, he dubbed his voice for almost all Rajinikanth starrers in Telugu. His voice became almost synonymous with Rajinikanth and was in great demand by all the directors and producers, he also dubbed his voice for Kamal Haasan in some movies in Telugu.

Music composing and producing[edit]

Mano has worked as a music composer for the 2008 released Telugu film Sombheri, he got good response for his compositions. He also tried his hands on releasing Tamil film Azhagiya Tamil magan (2007) as Mahaa Muduru in 2010 starring Vijay and Shriya Saran in the lead roles; the film, however, flopped at the box-office. He also produced two movies dubbed from Telugu to Tamil Madurai Thimiru and Kumaran Rajini Rasigan (dubbed versions of Yogi and Bujjigadu) under the studio name, "Lord Venkateshwara Productions" and "Mano Media Entertainments" respectively.[3]

Television works[edit]

Mano is hosting Manathodu Mano - a musical talk show in Jaya TV, he is also one of the permanent judging panel for Vijay TV's musical reality show Airtel Super Singer Junior along with Chitra and Malgudi Subha. He also co-judges the musical show Idea Super Singer on Maa TV.

Personal life[edit]

Mano is married to Jameela, they have three children. Shakir, Rafi, and Sofia, they both have made their debut in singing for the movie Kumaran Rajini Rasigan. The elder son Shakir is being introduced as a lead actor in a couple of Tamil films. Mano loves listening to ghazals by Mehdi Hassan and Ghulam Ali.

Filmography[edit]

Malayalam
Telugu
Tamil

Discography[edit]

Telugu Discography[edit]

1980s[edit]

Year Film Song Composer(s) Writer(s) Co-Singer(s)
1986 Vikram "Ding Dong" K. Chakravarthy
1987 Gundamma Gari Krishnulu "How Are You" K. Chakravarthy
"Jamale Idi Intele"
"Poddu Valapu Vaddu"
"Hai Krishna"
1988 Asthulu Anthasthulu "Thulli Thulli" Ilaiyaraaja
Rudraveena "Randi Randi" Ilaiyaraaja
1989 Siva "Sarasalu Chalu" Ilaiyaraaja S. Janaki

1990s[edit]

Year Film Song Composer(s) Writer(s) Co-Singer(s)
1992 Roja "Vinara Vinara" A. R. Rahman
1993 Donga Donga "Veera Bobbili" A. R. Rahman
"Kotha Bangaru"
"Kanulu Kanulanu"
Padmavyuham "July Maasam" A. R. Rahman
1994 Palnati Pourusham "Raagala Chilaka" A. R. Rahman
"Idigo Peddapuram"
Super Police "Teku Kuttina Tenalilo" A. R. Rahman
"Mukkambe Mukkambe"
Gangmaster "Nagu Monu Nagma" A. R. Rahman
"Baddaragiri"
"Kila Kilala"
"Aa Siggu Eggu Enthavaraku"
Vanitha "Koodu Pettebhoomi" A. R. Rahman
Premikudu "Mukkala Mukkabula" A. R. Rahman
1995 Muthu "Thillana Thillana" A. R. Rahman
Rangeli "Yemi Cheyavachu" A. R. Rahman
1996 Love Birds "Come On Come On" A. R. Rahman
Prema Desham "Vennela Vennela" A. R. Rahman
"College Style"
1997 Merupu Kalalu "Strawberry Kanne" A. R. Rahman
Iddaru "Adhukonadam" A. R. Rahman
"Odalu Mannata"
Annamayya "Padaharu Kalalaku" M. M. Keeravaani
"Sobhaname Sobhaname"
"Asmadeeya"
"Nanati Bathuku"
1998 Prematho "O Priyathama" A. R. Rahman
1999 Chinni Chinni Aasa "Mallepulla Jallule" Raj
"Aa Vankachusuko"
Narasimha "Kikku Ekkele" A. R. Rahman
Iddaru Mitrulu "Nootokka Jillalo" Mani Sharma
Jodi "Andhala Jeeva" A. R. Rahman

2000s[edit]

Year Film Song Composer(s) Writer(s) Co-singer(s)
2000 Manasunna Maaraju "Oodala Oodala" Vandemataram Srinivas Sujatha Mohan, Malgudi Subha, Tippu
Maa Annayya "Thajaga Maa Intlo" S. A. Rajkumar K. S. Chithra, Sujatha Mohan
Kshemamga Velli Labhamga Randi "Aadavallamandi Memu" Vandemataram Srinivas K. S. Chithra
Bachi "Habibi" Chakri Kulashekar Gopika Poornima, Usha
Moodu Mukkalaata "Chinavaada Chinavaada" M. M. Srilekha Chandrabose Nithyasree Mahadevan
2001 Narasimha Naidu "Chilakapacha Koka" Mani Sharma Bhuvana Chandra Radhika
Soori "Kottu Kottu Tenkaaya" Vidyasagar Kaluva Krishna Sai
"Gumma Saradaaga" Sujatha Mohan
Kushi "Holi Holi" Mani Sharma Suddala Ashok Teja Swarnalatha
Hanuman Junction "Golumaalu Golumaalu" Suresh Peters Veturi Sundararama Murthy K. S. Chithra, M. G. Sreekumar
Subbu "Janani Janma Bhoomi" Mani Sharma Jaladi
"Hari Hara" Kulashekar Sunitha
Naalo Unna Prema "O Naa Priyathama" Koti K. S. Chithra
2004 Swarabhishekam "Nee Chente Oka" Vidyasagar Sirivennela Seetharama Sastry K. S. Chithra

2010s[edit]

Year Film Song Composer(s) Writer(s) Co-Singer(s)
2013 Gundello Godari "Ekkadundi Ekkadundi" Ilaiyaraaja
Iddarammayilatho "Shankara Bharanamtho" Devi Sri Prasad
2014 Lingaa "Mona Mona" A. R. Rahman
2017 Gayatri "Ravana Bramha" S. Thaman
2019 Petta "Mass Maranam" Anirudh Ravichander
Kurukshetram "Jhumma Jhumma" V. Harikrishna
"Bharata Vamshaja"

Telugu Discography[edit]

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mano's Songs List at". Thiraipaadal.com. Retrieved 1 March 2012.
  2. ^ http://myswar.com/artist/mano
  3. ^ a b http://www.idlebrain.com/celeb/interview/nagurbabu.html
  4. ^ "Mano". Jointscene. Archived from the original on 23 April 2012. Retrieved 11 April 2012.

External links[edit]