Mariano Campodónico

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Mariano Campodónico
Personal information
Full name Mariano Alejandro Campodónico
Date of birth (1974-05-04) 4 May 1974 (age 44)
Place of birth Adrogué, Argentina
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Playing position Forward
Youth career
Temperley
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1994–1998 Banfield
1998–1999 Platense 17 (0)
1999–2000 San Martín (SJ)
2000–2001 Arsenal de Sarandí
2001–2002 El Porvenir
2002 Caracas
2002–2003 SD Aucas
2003 Deportivo Quito
2003–2004 Gimnasia
2004 Chiapas
2004–2005 Ferro Carril Oeste
2005–2007 Belgrano
2007 Nueva Chicago 12 (0)
2007–2008 San Martín (T) 10 (6)
2008–2009 Cerro Porteño 15 (2)
2009 Aldosivi 17 (6)
2009–2010 All Boys 40 (14)
2010–2011 Belgrano 29 (4)
2011–2013 Temperley 44 (10)
2013–2015 Talleres 9 (11)
2015 Mitre 18 (2)
2016 Cañuelas
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 01:00, 31 October 2016 (UTC)

Mariano Alejandro Campodónico (born 4 May 1974) is a retired Argentine footballer forward who last played for Cañuelas.[1][2][3] He is the brother of current footballer Pablo Campodónico.[4][5]

Career[edit]

Campodónico started his career in 1994, his first club was Banfield, he remained with them for four years before joining Platense with whom he made 17 appearances.[6] 1999 saw Campodónico leave Platense and complete a move to San Martín (SJ) before subsequently agreeing to join Arsenal de Sarandí in 2000 and El Porvenir in 2001.[6] In 2002, Campodónico moved out of Argentina for the first-team as he agreed to sign for Venezuelan Primera División club Caracas, however his spell with Caracas was short as he soon departed to join Ecuadorian Serie A side Aucas.[6]

One year later he left to join fellow Ecuadorian team Deportivo Quito. Moves to Gimnasia, Chiapas, Ferro Carril Oeste and Belgrano followed between 2003 and 2007.[6] In 2004, Campodónico, playing for Ferro Carril Oeste scored twice against Sarmiento. Sarmiento's goalkeeper was Campodónico's own brother, Pablo. Mariano told reporters that "this was the worst thing that's happened to me in my football career".[7] In 2006, while playing for Belgrano, Campodónico was sentenced to eight days in prison for making "obscene gestures" at the opposing team during a football game.[8]

He joined Nueva Chicago in 2007 and made 12 appearances before leaving not long after joining to complete a transfer to San Martín (T).[6] 6 goals in 10 appearances followed for San Martín (T) before Campodónico moved to Paraguay to play for Cerro Porteño.[6] He was with Cerro Porteño for one season, 2008, before eventually joining Aldosivi, which meant he was at the same team as his brother, Pablo, for the first-time.[2][9] After leaving Aldosivi, he joined All Boys before then moving to Belgrano (second spell), Temperley and Talleres. Campodónico played for Mitre in 2015 and Cañuelas in 2016 before announcing his retirement.[2][6][10]

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

San Martín (T)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Un goleador muy cuestionado". La Geceta (in Spanish). Tucuman, Argentina. 6 Dec 2009. Retrieved 24 May 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c "Mariano Campodónico profile". Soccerway. 31 October 2016. Retrieved 31 October 2016. 
  3. ^ "Mariano Campodónico profile". ESPN FC. 31 October 2016. Retrieved 31 October 2016. 
  4. ^ "Mariano Campodónico firmó con Aldosivi". Lavoz. 17 December 2008. Retrieved 31 October 2016. 
  5. ^ "Ferro se puso a tiro de los punteros". TyC Sports. 11 October 2004. Retrieved 31 October 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h "Se despidió Campodónico, el goleador talismán". Clarin. 16 June 2016. Retrieved 31 October 2016. 
  7. ^ "Tears flow as striker beats brother". Reuters. October 15, 2004. Archived from the original on 22 June 2011. Retrieved 24 May 2010. 
  8. ^ "Condenado a ocho días de prisión por realizar gestos obscenos". La Nacion (in Spanish). 9 May 2006. Retrieved 24 May 2010. 
  9. ^ "Campodónico profile". Soccerway. 31 October 2016. Retrieved 31 October 2016. 
  10. ^ "Se retiró el jugador argentino que jugó en 20 clubes". DxTV. 16 June 2016. Retrieved 31 October 2016. 

External links[edit]