Mayumi Narita

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Mayumi Narita
Medal record
Swimming
Paralympic Games
Gold medal – first place 1996 Atlanta 100 m Freestyle S4
Gold medal – first place 1996 Atlanta 50 m Freestyle S4
Gold medal – first place 2000 Sydney 50 m backstroke S4
Gold medal – first place 2000 Sydney 50 m freestyle S4
Gold medal – first place 2000 Sydney 100 m freestyle S4
Gold medal – first place 2000 Sydney 150 m individual medley SM4
Gold medal – first place 2000 Sydney 200 m freestyle S4
Gold medal – first place 2000 Sydney 4×50 m freestyle relay 20 pts
Gold medal – first place 2004 Athens 50 m freestyle S4
Gold medal – first place 2004 Athens 100 m freestyle S4
Gold medal – first place 2004 Athens 200 m freestyle S4
Gold medal – first place 2004 Athens 50 m breaststroke SB3
Gold medal – first place 2004 Athens 50 m backstroke S4
Gold medal – first place 2004 Athens 150 m individual medley SM4
Gold medal – first place 2004 Athens 4×50 m freestyle relay 20 pts
Silver medal – second place 1996 Atlanta 200 m Freestyle S4
Silver medal – second place 1996 Atlanta 50 m Backstroke S4
Silver medal – second place 2000 Sydney 50 m breaststroke SB3
Bronze medal – third place 1996 Atlanta 150 m Medley SM4
Bronze medal – third place 2004 Athens 4×50 m medley relay 20 pts

Mayumi Narita (成田 真由美, Narita Mayumi, born August 27, 1970 in Kawasaki, Kanagawa)[1] is a Japanese swimmer, described as "one of the world’s best Paralympic athletes" by the International Paralympic Committee.[2] Japan Today has described her as a "swimming sensation perhaps as great as the Thorpedo but whose name few know".[3] She has won 15 gold medals at the Paralympics, and 20 total.

Narita has used a wheelchair because of myelitis since the age of 13; in 1994, additionally, she was involved in a traffic accident which left her quadriplegic.[4] In 1996, she represented Japan at the Paralympic Games in Atlanta, where she won two gold medals, two silver and one bronze. At the 2000 Summer Paralympics in Sydney, she won six gold medals.[5] She also set five world records at the Sydney Games.[6]

Narita competed again at the 2004 Summer Paralympics in Athens, and was the Games' most successful athlete, of any nationality and in any sport. She set six world records, seven Paralympic records, and won seven gold medals and one bronze medal.[7][8]

In 2005, she was given the Best Female Athlete award by the International Paralympic Committee, the Best Male Athlete award going to Brazil's Clodoaldo Silva.[9]

Narita is currently vice chair of the Tokyo 2016 Athletes' Commission.[10]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "Paralympic Sport Awards Winners - 2005" Archived 2008-03-21 at the Wayback Machine., International Paralympic Committee
  3. ^ "Paralympics champ competes against prejudice"[permanent dead link], Japan Today, August 7, 2001
  4. ^ "Paralympic Sport Awards Winners - 2005" Archived 2008-03-21 at the Wayback Machine., International Paralympic Committee
  5. ^ "Paralympic Sport Awards Winners - 2005" Archived 2008-03-21 at the Wayback Machine., International Paralympic Committee
  6. ^ "Paralympics champ competes against prejudice"[permanent dead link], Japan Today, August 7, 2001
  7. ^ "Paralympic Sport Awards Winners - 2005" Archived 2008-03-21 at the Wayback Machine., International Paralympic Committee
  8. ^ "Paralympics Athens 2004 - facts and figures", People's Daily, September 29, 2004
  9. ^ "Paralympic Sport Awards Winners - 2005" Archived 2008-03-21 at the Wayback Machine., International Paralympic Committee
  10. ^ "Olympic Stars Enhance TOKYO 2016 Games Plan", press release, July 11, 2008