Melville Dundas

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Melville Dundas
Industry Construction
Fate Went into administration
Founded 1908
Defunct 2003
Headquarters Glasgow
Key people
Alexander Dundas (Chairman 1908-1937)
Kenneth Dundas (Chairman 1937-1950)
King George V Bridge

Melville Dundas was a major Scottish construction company.

History[edit]

The business was established by Alexander Dundas in 1908 and incorporated as Melville Dundas & Whitson in 1932.[1] Kenneth Dundas took over as chairman of the business in 1937.[1] During the Second World War the company was one of the contractors engaged in building the Mulberry harbour units.[2] The company was acquired by F J C Lilley plc in 1981[3] which traded as Lilley plc from April 1989[4] until it went into receivership in January 1993.[5] Melville Dundas was bought out of receivership by the management but went into administration itself in May 2003.[6]

Major projects undertaken by the company included the George V Bridge, Glasgow completed in 1928,[7] the extension to the Glasgow Dental Hospital and School completed in 1970,[8] University Hospital Crosshouse completed in 1978[9] and the conversion of Queen's Hall, Edinburgh completed in 1979.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Public works chairman: Mr Kenneth Dundas". The Glasgow Herald. 13 April 1950. Retrieved 20 September 2015. 
  2. ^ Hartcup, p. 94
  3. ^ "Obituary: Harold Whitson". Glasgow Herald. 13 July 2013. Retrieved 20 September 2015. 
  4. ^ "Lilley fit and profitable". Glasgow Herald. 25 April 1989. Retrieved 20 September 2015. 
  5. ^ "No. 23303". The Edinburgh Gazette. 10 June 1948. p. 96. 
  6. ^ "300 jobs at risk as Melville Dundas falls into the hands of the receivers". Glasgow Herald. 24 May 2003. Retrieved 20 September 2015. 
  7. ^ "Melville Dundas & Whitson". 1930 Industrial Britain. Retrieved 20 September 2015. 
  8. ^ "Melville Dundas & Whitson". Scottish Brutalism. Retrieved 20 September 2015. 
  9. ^ "Board told to reject faulty £10m hospital". The Glasgow Herald. 29 November 1978. Retrieved 20 September 2015. 
  10. ^ "The Story of the Queen's Hall" (PDF). Retrieved 20 September 2015. 

Sources[edit]

  • Hartcup, Guy (2011). Code Name Mulberry: The Planning Building and Operation of the Normandy Harbours. Pen & Sword Military. ISBN 978-1848845589.