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Meyers Chuck, Wrangell

Meyers Chuck is a former census-designated place in the City and Borough of Wrangell, United States. The population was 21 at the 2000 census, at which time it was in the former Prince of Wales-Outer Ketchikan Census Area. On June 1, 2008, it was annexed into the newly created City and Borough of Wrangell, most of whose territory came from the former Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area. Meyers Chuck is located at 55°44′31″N 132°15′48″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP had a total area of 0.8 square miles, of which, 0.6 square miles of it is land and 0.2 square miles of it is water. There are only two ways to get to Alaska: by boat or float plane. Meyers Chuck first reported on the 1950 U. S. Census as the unincorporated village of "Meyer's Chuck." From 1950-70, it was returned as "Myers Chuck." In 1980 it returned as Meyers Chuck. In 2008, it was formally annexed into Wrangell; as of the census of 2000, there were 21 people, 9 households, 7 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 36.0 people per square mile.

There were 48 housing units at an average density of 82.4/sq mi. The racial makeup of the CDP was 90.48% White, 9.52% from two or more races. There were 9 households out of which 22.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.7% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 22.2% were non-families. No households were made up of individuals and none had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older; the average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.29. In the CDP, the age distribution of the population shows 9.5% under the age of 18, 23.8% from 25 to 44, 61.9% from 45 to 64, 4.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 50 years. For every 100 females, there were 110.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 111.1 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $64,375, the median income for a family was $64,375. Males had a median income of $0 versus $0 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $31,660.

There were no families and none of the population living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and none of those over 64. Blue Book of Boats: Cruising Destination - Meyers Chuck, Alaska

Sankoty Aquifer

The Sankoty aquifer is an aquifer in the U. S. state of Illinois that provides groundwater to a number of communities in northwestern and central Illinois. It is an unconsolidated deposit lying in a bedrock valley occupied by the ancestral Mississippi River; the sand which forms the Sankoty aquifer was named after a railroad siding near Peoria, Illinois in 1946 by Leland Horberg. The legal description given by Horberg in identifying the type locality for the Sankoty sand is T9N, R8E, Section 15; the Sankoty sand is an unconsolidated deposit within a bedrock valley occupied by the ancestral Mississippi River. It is classified as a member of the Banner Formation and occupies the same stratigraphic position as the Mahomet sand; the Sankoty sand has distinctive characteristics that are recognized in sample cuttings. In its most typical aspect, the Sankoty is composed of 70 to 90 percent quartz grains of which 25 percent or more are pink and polished; the texture is medium-grained but varies from silty fine sand to coarse gravelly sand.

The Sankoty sand is one of the most extensive aquifers in the state. It is 100 feet thick and is found below elevations of 520 to 530 feet above sea level, it has been used as a water source in the Peoria area since at least 1892. By 1909, it was observed that groundwater levels at the North Field in Peoria fluctuated with the river stage in the Illinois River; the Sankoty aquifer extends beyond the width of the Illinois River valley and occurs beneath the uplands. In these locations, it is confined by clayey deposits of glacial till; the groundwater may occur under confined conditions. Groundwater pumping has altered historical groundwater flow in the Sankoty aquifer; the flat geography of the area leads to groundwater flows that are perpendicular to the Illinois River, however municipal groundwater pumping in the Peoria, Illinois area and to a lesser degree agricultural pumping elsewhere over the aquifer has led to numerous cones of depression. Groundwater in the Peoria Region. Horberg, Max Suter, T.

E. Larson, 1950 Illinois State Water Survey, Bulletin 39, Champaign, IL 128 p. Water Resources in Peoria-Pekin District. Buswell, A. M, 1940 Illinois State Water Survey, Bulletin 33, IL 114 p

Casselberry, Florida

Casselberry is a city in Seminole County, United States. The population was 26,241 at the 2010 census; the city is considered linked to the Orlando–Kissimmee–Sanford Metropolitan Statistical Area. Casselberry is located at 28°39′40″N 81°19′19″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.1 square miles, of which 6.7 square miles is land and 0.4 square miles is water. Casselberry features over 30 lakes and ponds, the largest being Lake Howell, the Triplet Chain of Lakes, Lake Kathryn, Lake Concord. Prior to European settlement in the 19th-century Native American groups inhabited the Seminole County area, including land in present-day Casselberry. Casselberry was part of unincorporated Fern Park. Residents decided to incorporate Casselberry as a tax-free town in 1940, with the purpose of avoiding property taxes; the town was reincorporated as a city in 1965, property taxes were reinstated in 1976. At the 2010 U. S. Census, there were 26,241 people, 11,430 households, 6,398 families residing in the city.

The population density was 3,751.9 inhabitants per square mile. There were 12,708 housing units; the racial makeup of the city was 80.1% White, 8.0% African American, 0.4% Native American, 2.9% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 4.9% from other races, 3.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 22.6% of the population. There were 11,430 households out of which 23.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.8% were married couples living together, 14.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 44.0% were non-families. 32.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.92. The median income for a household in the city was $44,807, the median income for a family was $51,371; the per capita income for the city was $24,184. About 14.7% of the population were below the poverty line. Sterling Park Elementary Red Bug Elementary Casselberry Elementary South Seminole Academy of Leadership, Law & Advanced Studies The City of Casselberry maintains 17 parks ranging from small neighborhood parks to large centers for recreation.

Some of these parks include: Branch Tree Park Crystal Bowl Park Dew Drop Park Forest Brook Park Lake Concord Park Lake Hodge Park Lancelot Park Pawmosa Dog Park Plumosa Oaks Park Red Bug Lake Park Rotary Park Secret Lake Park Sunnytown Park Sunset Park Veterans Memorial Park Wirz Park Wirz TrailThe City of Casselberry's adopted Parks Master Plan calls for the development of a skatepark. The development of a community skatepark has been advocated for by citizens of the city for over two years through a grassroots campaign. Seminole Speedway was located in Casselberry, operating between 1945 and 1954, hosting stock car and motorcycle racing. Jimmy Boyle, record producer and musician. Nick Calathes, basketball player for the Memphis Grizzlies and Greek club Panathinaikos Pat Calathes, basketball player for the Israeli club Maccabi Haifa and Greek club Panathinaikos Hedy Lamarr, Austrian-born actress and inventor. Robert James Miller, Medal of Honor Recipient buried at All Faiths Memorial Park.

Chandler Parsons, basketball player for the Memphis Grizzlies Kirsten Storms, lived in Casselberry during her childhood. Casselberry Economic Development City of Casselberry Seminole County Convention and Visitors Bureau Seminole Country Public Schools

Kendall West, Florida

Kendall West is a census-designated place and an unincorporated community in Miami-Dade County, west of the Florida Turnpike. The population was 38,034 at the 2000 census. Kendall West is located at 25°42′20″N 80°26′26″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the census area has a total area of 3.7 square miles, of which, 3.4 square miles of it is land and 0.3 square miles of it is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 38,034 people, 11,759 households, 9,807 families residing in the CDP; the population density was 11,218.6 people per square mile. There were 12,229 housing units at an average density of 3,607.1/sq mi. The racial makeup of the CDP was 83.37% White 4.23% African American, 0.19% Native American, 1.48% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 6.44% from other races, 4.25% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 79.03% of the population. There were 11,759 households out of which 49.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.8% were married couples living together, 18.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 16.6% were non-families.

11.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.5% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.23 and the average family size was 3.47. In the census area, the population was spread out with 29.2% under the age of 18, 10.2% from 18 to 24, 34.9% from 25 to 44, 18.5% from 45 to 64, 7.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.7 males. The median income for a household in the community was $38,715, the median income for a family was $39,564. Males had a median income of $30,082 versus $23,695 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $14,806. About 13.3% of families and 15.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.4% of those under age 18 and 13.4% of those age 65 or over. As of 2000, speakers of Spanish as a first language accounted for 84.44% of residents, while English made up 13.48%, both French Creole and Portuguese were the mother tongue for 0.47% of the population.

Kendall West, a neighborhood within the census boundaries of Kendall. Kendall West

Adam Melhuse

Adam Michael Melhuse is an American former professional baseball catcher. He played in Major League Baseball for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Colorado Rockies, Oakland Athletics and Texas Rangers, he is a minor league coach in the Los Angeles Dodgers system. Melhuse attended Lincoln High School in Stockton and was a student and a letterman in basketball and baseball, he played college baseball as a UCLA Bruin. In 1991, he played collegiate summer baseball with the Harwich Mariners of the Cape Cod Baseball League, returned to the league in 1992 to play for the Brewster Whitecaps. Melhuse played with the Los Angeles Dodgers, Colorado Rockies, Oakland Athletics, Texas Rangers, he is a switch-hitter. Melhuse collected his first career hit on August 24, 2000, in the 12th inning of an unusual game between the Rockies and Atlanta Braves. Out of pitchers, Rockies manager, Buddy Bell, asked injured catcher, Brent Mayne, unable to swing a bat due to a sprained left wrist, if he could pitch. Mayne held the Braves scoreless.

The following inning, with two outs and the bases loaded, pinch hitting for Mayne, singled over the shortstop's head to win the game. On January 5, 2007 Melhuse signed a minor league contract with the Oakland Athletics. On June 9, 2007, Melhuse was traded by the Athletics to the Texas Rangers for cash. Adam's career as a Texas Ranger was short-lived; the Rangers traded for Jarrod Saltalamacchia on July 31, 2007, which lessened Melhuse's playing time. Melhuse was designated for assignment on August 23, 2007, would be released, he re-signed with the Athletics for his second stint in 2007 on September 1 when rosters were expanded. Despite being on the Athletics for a second go-around in September, Melhuse sat on the bench the whole time and did not get into a game, he declared free agency on October 8, 2007, though not before being outrighted to the minors on October 5. On January 11, 2008 Melhuse signed a minor league contract with an invitation to spring training with the Texas Rangers, he made the team out of spring training as a backup to starting catcher Gerald Laird, but injured his hand in a game against the Detroit Tigers on April 24, resulting in his release.

In late June 2008, Melhuse signed a minor league contract with the Colorado Rockies and was called up on August 14, 2008. On August 30, 2008, Melhuse was called up to the Rockies from the Triple-A Sky Sox to replace Yorvit Torrealba, placed on the DL. Melhuse signed a minor league contract with the Texas Rangers in January 2009. However, he was released on April 4. On May 8, 2009, he signed a minor league contract with the Pittsburgh Pirates. On June 17, 2009 Melhuse announced his retirement. Melhuse spent four seasons as an advance scout for the Chicago Cubs and two seasons in the Los Angeles Angels system as manager of the Burlington Bees. In 2018, he joined the Los Angeles Dodgers organization as hitting coach for the Oklahoma City Dodgers, he was transferred to the Tulsa Drillers for 2019. Career statistics and player information from MLB, or ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or Baseball-Reference, or Retrosheet, or Pelota Binaria

Dhruv Raina

Dhruv Raina is a philosopher and historian of science from India. He is best known for his work on the domestication of science in colonial India, transnational intellectual networks of science and historiographies of science, he is Professor of History of Science Education at the Zakir Husain Centre for Educational Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. He had been a scientist at the National Institute of Science and Development Studies, New Delhi from 1991 to 2002, he was the first Heinrich Zimmer Chair for Indian Philosophy and Intellectual History, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany. His basic training is in physics, he completed his doctoral studies with Aant Elzinga in the philosophy of science from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden on the Jesuit enlightenment historiography of Indian astronomy and mathematics, his intellectual association with S. Irfan Habib led to the publication of a series of research articles on the cultural redefinition of modern science in colonial India.

They edited a volume on Joseph Needham and the section on Science in Twentieth South and South-East Asia for volume 7 of UNESCO's History of Mankind Project. Dhruv Raina and S. Irfan Habib. 1999. Situating the History of Science: Dialogues with Joseph Needham. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. Dhruv Raina. 2003. Images and Contexts: The Historography of Science and Modernity in India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. Dhruv Raina and S. Irfan Habib. 2004. Domesticating Modern Science: A Social History of Science and Culture in Colonial India. New Delhi: Tulika Books. S. Irfan Habib and Dhruv. Raina.. 2007. Social History of Science in Colonial India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. Feza Günnergun and Dhruv Raina. 2011. Science between Europe and Asia: Historical Studies on the Transmission and Adaptation of Knowledge, Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science. Dordrecht:Springer. Dhruv Raina 2015. Needham's Indian Network: The Search for a Home for the History of Science in India. New Delhi: Yoda Press.

Science and technology studies in India Profile on JNU Website"Seminar Magazine Special Issue on State of Science: a symposium on the relationship between science and democracy "Betwixt Jesuit and Enlightenment HIstoriography: Jean-Sylvain Baily's History of Indian Astronomy" "A Study in the Social-epistemology of "Science and Society" Education at Indian Universities and Technical Institutes" Institutions and the Global Transfer of Knowledge: A Discussion "How to Go to Heaven or How the Heavens Go?" "The Making of a Classic: The Contemporary Significance of P. C. Ray’s Historical Approach" "The Naturalization of Modern Science in South Asia: A Historical Overview of the Processes of Domestication and Globalization" Articles in Down to Earth Magazine