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Midfield, Alabama

Midfield is a town in Jefferson County, United States, located two miles south of the Birmingham suburb of Fairfield. It incorporated in 1953; as of the 2010 census, it had a population of 5,365. Midfield is located at 33°27′21″N 86°55′37″W. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, this town has a total area of all land; as of the census of 2000, there were 5,626 people, 2,186 households, 1,532 families residing in this town. The population density was 2,167.1 people per square mile. There were 2,393 housing units at an average density of 921.8 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 39.28% White, 59.49% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.11% from other races, 0.57% from two or more races. 0.14% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 2,186 households out of which 36.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.4% were married couples living together, 21.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 29.9% were non-families.

27.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.6% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.13. In the town the population was distributed with 28.8% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 30.8% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 85.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.2 males. The median income for a household in the city was $31,378, the median income for a family was $36,281. Males had a median income of $30,087 versus $25,386 for females; the per capita income for the city was $15,729. About 12.4% of families and 16.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.1% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over. As of the census of 2010, there were 5,365 people, 1,999 households, 1,398 families residing in this town; the population density was 2,063.5 people per square mile.

There were 2,330 housing units at an average density of 896.2 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 81.6% Black or African American, 16.4% White, 0.1% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 0.7% from other races, 0.9% from two or more races. 1.4 % of the population were Latino of any race. There were 1,999 households out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.3% were married couples living together, 31.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.1% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.24. In the town the population was distributed with 27.7% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 27.8% from 45 to 64, 9.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34.4 years. For every 100 females, there were 82.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,138, the median income for a family was $46,444. Males had a median income of $39,420 versus $28,648 for females; the per capita income for the city was $16,496. About 15.6% of families and 15.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.9% of those under age 18 and 12.1% of those age 65 or over. Ron Casey, former editor for the Birmingham News Michael Gibbons, American boxer J. J. Nelson, All-American wide receiver for the UAB Blazers Official website Midfield Area Chamber of Commerce

Walt Smallwood

Walter Clayton Smallwood was a professional baseball pitcher from 1913 to 1931. He won 192 games in the minor leagues and played two seasons in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees. Smallwood weighed 190 pounds. Smallwood was born in Dayton, Maryland, in 1893, he started his professional baseball career in 1913. The following season, he joined the South Atlantic League's Savannah Colts and compiled a win–loss record of 17–6. Smallwood went 8–16 in 1915 to lead the league in losses, he moved to the International League in 1916 and went 14–19 there to lead that league in losses, too. Smallwood rebounded in 1917, going 21–15, he made his major league debut in September with the New York Yankees. In two MLB relief appearances that year, he did not allow a run. Smallwood was out of professional baseball in 1918, he relieved in six games, all of which the Yankees lost. For the next few years, Smallwood bounced around the minor leagues, he had stints in the Pacific Coast League, American Association, International League, Eastern League from 1920 to 1927 and pitched over 150 innings in most of those seasons.

He finished his playing career with the Western League's Pueblo Braves, which he managed, in 1931. Smallwood lost 201 during his 17-season career in professional baseball, he was buried in New Cathedral Cemetery. Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Baseball-Reference

Sant'Angelo in Pescheria

Sant'Angelo in Pescheria or in Piscaria is a church in Rome. It dates from the 8th century. "In Pescheria" refers to its location close to the fish market built in the ruins of the ancient Porticus Octaviae. The relics of St. Symphorosa and her seven sons were transferred to the Church of Sant'Angelo in Pescheria at Rome by Pope Stephen II in 752. A sarcophagus was found here in 1610, bearing the inscription: Hic requiescunt corpora SS. Martyrum Simforosae, viri sui Zotici et Filiorum ejus a Stephano Papa translata; this inscription refers to Saint Getulius and Saint Symphorosa, purported to be husband and wife, who had seven sons, who were martyred. The remains of these saints were transferred to Sant'Angelo by Pope Stephen II in 752; the revolutionary "tribune" Cola di Rienzo was born near Sant'Angelo. He launched his effort to seize control of Rome from the vicinity of the church in 1347; the Roman Ghetto was established nearby in the rione Sant'Angelo in 1555 by order of Pope Paul IV. The Ghetto was abolished in 1870 after the reunification of Italy or Risorgimento, the Ghetto wall was demolished in 1888.

The rione Sant'Angelo, numbered as XI, is named for the church. The inscriptions found in S. Angelo, a valuable source illustrating the history of the Basilica, have been collected and published by Vincenzo Forcella. In the second chapel to the left inside the church are frescoes of the Madonna with Child and Angels attributed to Benozzo Gozzoli; the Church is in the possession of the Order of Clerics Regular Minor, which utilizes the attached convent as their Generalate House. Conradus Eubel, Hierarchia catholica medii aevi Tomus I, editio altera, p. 49.

Miao Lu

Dr. Miao Lu (Chinese: 苗绿. Miao is an expert on international cultural exchange, she is the Secretary General of China Global Talent Society under the Ministry of Human Resources in China and Deputy Secretary General of Policy Advisory Committee of China Western Returned Scholars Association. She is the Associate Dean of South China Global Talent Institute. In 2012, she assisted Mo Yan, the Chinese Nobel Prize Laureate in Literature, in founding the International Writing Center of Beijing Normal University, serves as Deputy Director General there. Dr. Lu Miao is the Co-founder, Vice President and Secretary-General of the Center for China and Globalization, a leading Beijing-based non-governmental Chinese think tank. In ten years under the leadership of Dr. Miao and other Co-founder Dr. Wang Huiyao, CCG has grown from a small research center with a limited staff, into China's largest independent think tank, boasting over 100 full-time research and professional staff. Through her vision and unwavering dedication, she has helped build a strong foundation for the organization's research and policy advisory capacities in the areas of international migration, global trade and investment relations, global governance.

Beijing’s recent decision to establish two new state apparatus: the National Immigration Administration and the International Development Agency, testifies to the think tank’s unique policy advocacy capability in the Chinese context. Dr. Miao is part of the organization's "track II diplomacy" initiative, in which high-level government officials and think tankers from the United States, Great Britain, other major countries in intellectual engage in exchanges and bridge-building efforts. Dr. Miao has played a leading role in the establishment of the CCG Advisory Council, an elite platform drawing from members of China's elite business and policy-making communities, including former ministers, university presidents, founders of China's largest conglomerates, she has invited former heads of state, Nobel laureates, celebrated scholars and journalists, such as Kevin Rudd, Condoleezza Rice, Thomas Friedman and Mo Yan to CCG offices for high-level talks on critical issues in the field of globalization.

She chairs the organizing committees of the China and Globalization Forum and the China Outbound Forum, CCG's two annual flagship conferences attended by the nation's business elites, opinion leaders, senior government officials. She is a member of the prestigious B20 China Business Council. In June 2018, she was awarded "Management Excellence Award" by the China Management Science Society. Dr. Miao is an experienced public speaker, having delivered keynote speeches and moderated numerous panels at home and abroad, she was awarded "International Young Leader" by the King of Belgium, H. M. Philippe Leopold Louis Marie in 2016, the only Chinese recipient to receive this honour. An accomplished scholar, she has 30 publications under her belt, including monographs, edited volumes, co-authored books, journal articles in both Chinese and English, she holds a Ph. D degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies from Beijing Normal University and was a visiting fellow at New York University and Harvard University, holds a postdoctoral from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

Dr. Miao is a recent member of the Hupan University, an exclusive top elite program founded by Alibaba's Jack Ma that admits only the most outstanding social and business entrepreneurs under 35. Dr. Miao is a scholar of Lien Ying Chow Legacy Fellowship, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Co-Author, China Goes Global, How China's Overseas Investment is Transforming its Business Enterprises, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016 Co-Author, International Talent War, China Machinery Press, China, 2015 Co-Author, Global Think Tanks, People's Press, China, 2014 Co-Author and the Novelist, Beijing Normal University Press, 2010 Co-Author, Contemporary Chinese Literature Ideological Trend History, Beijing Normal University Press, China, 2009 Co-Author and the Novelist, Beijing Normal University Press, China, 2009 Co-Author, Contemporary Chinese Returned Scholars, China State Council Development Press, China Co-Editor, Handbook on China and Globalization, Edward Edgar, England, 2017 Co-Editor, Entrepreneurial Advice —40 Most Well-Known Chinese Entrepreneurs from Start-ups in China, China's Central Translating and Compiling Press, China, 2016 Co-Editor, China Outbound Tide, Chinese Enterprisers Going Global, China Machinery Press, China, 2015 Co-Editor, Global Enterprises Blue Book—Annual Report on Chinese Enterprises Globalization Development, China Social Science Academy Press, China, 2015 Co-Editor, Global Talent Blue Book—Annual Report of Chinese International Migration, China Social Science Academy Press, China, 2015 Co-Editor, Global Talent Blue Book—Annual Report of Chinese Students Study Abroad, China Social Science Academy Press, China, 2013 Co-Editor, Global Talent Blue Book—Annual Report of Chinese Returnee Development, China Social Science Academy Press, China, 2013 Co-Editor, Global Enterprises Blue Book—Annual Report on Chinese Enterprises Globalization Development, China Social Science Academy Press, China, 2014 Co-Editor, Global Talent Blue Book—Annual Report of Chinese Students Study Abroad, China Social Science Aca

Mount Zion Cemetery (New York City)

Mount Zion Cemetery is a large Jewish cemetery located in Maspeth, New York City. The first burial was in 1893, as of 2015, more than 210,000 individuals had been buried there, it is noted for its memorial to those. Its grounds cover 78 acres, are divided into hundreds of plots, or gates, by landsmanshaften, synagogues, or families. Herman M. Albert, New York State Assemblyman Birdie Amsterdam, lawyer and New York State Supreme Court justice William Cohen, U. S. Army sergeant killed by troops of Pancho Villa on U. S. soil in the Glenn Springs raid Bernard Drachman, rabbi Morris Michael Edelstein, U. S. congressman Isidore Einstein, federal agent in the Bureau of Prohibition Berta Gersten, actress in Yiddish theater Marvin Hamlisch and conductor Lorenz Hart, lyricist Naftali Herz Imber, poet and composer of Hatikva, the Israeli national anthem. Disinterred and reburied in Israel in 1953. Irving L. Levey, New York State Supreme Court justice Edna Luby and comedian Teresa Mors, killed by the boxer Kid McCoy Herman Weiss, New York assemblyman Nathanael West and screenwriter Eva Zeisel, industrial designer Mount Zion Cemetery

Rogers Middle School for the Creative and Performing Arts

Rogers Middle School for the Creative and Performing Arts was an arts magnet school located in Garfield, near East Liberty, Highland Park neighborhoods of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Rogers CAPA offers students nine Arts majors: Creative Writing, Drama, Multimedia, Stagecraft, Visual Arts, Vocal. Admission is by audition. Academic courses include Communications, Health, Mathematics, Physical Education, Social Studies, Spanish. Rogers CAPA is one of ten middle schools in the Pittsburgh Public Schools. In 2005 it was ranked 111th of 500 middle schools in the state of Pennsylvania. In June 2009, this building was closed and the program was merged into the Pittsburgh Creative and Performing Arts School; as part of the court-mandated desegregation plan, the Gladstone School for the Creative and Performing Arts opened in September 1979 for grades 4–8. One of the plan's objectives was to create a unique program that would attract a population that would be drawn from all neighborhoods in the city. A process of application and audition was instituted, which has served as a successful method of admission to the school.

In September 1980, the program was moved to its present location in the Rogers building and changed to its current format of grades 6–8. A major addition to the program was the hiring of an adjunct teaching staff of artists and performers with a high level of expertise. In its lifetime the school has served over 8000 students by developing their artistic and academic talents. One of the hallmarks of Rogers School has been the institution of school-wide interdisciplinary units that unite academic and arts subjects, thus enriching and extending student learning. Throughout the years, units have included Shakespeare, the Civil War, Broadway musicals, the Shapers of History. All arts staff involve their students in the production of stage presentation, the academic staff creates specific lesson plans that relate to the theme and support the creation of the stage production. In 1992, the entire staff and student body collaborated with the Pittsburgh Opera in the student-centered production of the opera The Pied Piper of Hamelin.

Shadowing the professionals, students wrote copy for the print and electronic media, designed the program cover, conducted the orchestra though some rehearsals, interviewed the principal actors and wrote biographies, choreographed dance sequences, designed and created costumes worn during the production. Community partners and supporters included the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, the Dance Alloy, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Pittsburgh Citiparks, the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, the Pittsburgh Opera; the building housing the current Middle School CAPA program was named for James E. Rogers, a member of the Hiland Sub-District School Board for twenty years, it was built in 1915 and had 742 students enrolled that year, by 1953 the enrollment had increased to 900 students. In 1980 the school was closed, reopened in 1982 for the current CAPA program. In 2002 the building was designated a Historic Landmark by the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation.

As of October 1, 2007, the student enrollment of 315 has the following demographics: The faculty at Rogers CAPA teach in either the Arts or Academics, with some teaching both. Creative Writing: Ms. Kathleen Donnelly, Mrs. Janelle Price Dance: Mrs. Denise Azzari, Mr. Anthony Dixon Drama: Ms. Christine Laitta, Mrs. Sara Lamb Instrumental: Mr. Jan Fung, Mr. Tom Godfrey, Mr. James Guerra, Mr. Dale Hertrick, Mr. Richard Mansfield, Ms. Dena Miller, Ms. Karen Sloneker Multimedia: Ms. Sheila McBride Piano: Mrs. Ellen Keeney Stagecraft: Mr. William Scheuering Visual Arts: Mr. Victor Capone, Mr. Parris Hugley, Mr. George Morris, Ms. Kyra Schon*Vocal: Mr. Henry Biggs, Mr. Mark Spondike, Ms. Margery Schell Communications: Mrs. Caroline Kelly Anthony, Mrs. Diane Carroll, Ms. Adel Fougnies, Ms. Lynn Marsico, Mrs. Angela Wynert Health/Physical Education: Ms. Cindy Haigh Library: none Mathematics: Mr. David Hairston, Ms. Ehrin, Mrs. Wilma Rubin, Ms. Alice Rysdon Science: Dr. Terrance Golden, Mr. David Hairston, Mr. Robert Vogel, Mrs. Ilyssa Ringold Social Studies: Mr. P.

J. Loskoch, Mr. Robert Vogel, Mrs. Angela Wynert Spanish: Mr. Arlo Benjamin African American History Bowl book club National Junior Honor Society Pennsylvania Junior Academy of Science Rogers CAPA PSCC Rogers CAPA Sports Teams Students for Justice Think-a-Thon Tri-M Yearbook club When Superintendent Mark Roosevelt announced his right-sizing plan on November 9, 2005, it included the relocation of Rogers CAPA to the Baxter Elementary building occupied by CAPA High. Due to the negative response of the students and faculty, this plan was dropped in the final right-sizing plan of February 28, 2006. At a community meeting on March 28, 2006, Superintendent Roosevelt announced plans to form a committee to find and recommend a suitable destination for relocation; the committee, formed of parents, teachers and community members, first met on July 20, 2006 and made a final recommendation to the Superintendent on October 19, 2006. On November 1, Roosevelt presented to the Board of Education the committee's recommendation to move the CAPA Middle School program into the closed Milliones Middle School building.

40.4497°N 79.9625°W / 40.4497.