Military Order of the World Wars

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The Military Order of the World War was created in 1919 by General of the Armies John J. Pershing as a fraternity for American military officers coming out of the Great War. Two decades later, when the USA became involved in WWII the organization name was pluralized to its current title of Military Order of the World Wars. Though the Order's title has not changed since 1945, it remains a current officer's society welcoming new qualified members in current military service and has members from the Korean War, Vietnam War, Gulf War, War in Afghanistan, War in Iraq, and peacetime service.[1]

Membership[edit]

Membership in the MOWW is open to any and all commissioned and warrant officers who served honorably, or are currently serving, in any branch of the U.S. Armed Forces regardless of length of service or status as a combat veteran dating back to April 6, 1917 when the USA entered WWI. Additionally, any direct lineal descendant from a qualifying officer may also join the order, which indicates that the order also serves as a genealogical society.[2]

Famous members include:

Awards & Insignia[edit]

All members of the Order are entitled to wear the badge of the order, which consists of the emblem suspended from a mini rainbow ribbon of reversed colors from the WWI Victory Medal. Perpetual (life) membership denoted by a silver service star.

Any member of the Order may earn the Patrick Henry Award in any of three levels: bronze, silver, and gold for patriotic achievements to the nation or community.

Any member of the Order may earn the Outreach Service Medal for serving as the chairman of a chapter's outreach programs serving various American youth, institutions, or public servants for at least 1 year. Examples of these outreach groups include scouting (Eagle Scouts and Girl Scout Gold Award recipients), JROTC cadets, ROTC cadets, law enforcement professionals, and other similar civic organizations. Multiple awards denoted by silver service stars.

Any member of the Order may earn the Outstanding Service Award for exceptional service to the Order for a period of at least three years. Multiple awards denoted by silver service stars.[4]

Awards Presented to other Organizations[edit]

-JROTC Award of Merit: presented to the best first year, second year, and third year cadet in a JROTC battalion each class year. Multiple awards denoted by silver service stars.

-ROTC Award of Merit: presented to the best first year (bronze), second year (silver), and third year (gold) cadet in a JROTC battalion each class year. As there is a different ribbon for each ROTC program year, multiple awards to the same cadet are not possible (though a single exceptional cadet could earn the different awards).

-Eagle Scout Certificate: presented to members of the Boy Scouts of America who have earned the Eagle Scout rank.

-Gold Award Certificate: presented to members of the Girl Scouts of the USA who have earned the Gold Award.

It was announced in late 2016 that certificates would be added for the BSA Summit and BSA Quartermaster awards as well.[5]

Related Organizations[edit]

Society of the Cincinnati For officers of the War of the Revolution and their male descendants (est. 1783).

Aztec Club of 1847 For officers of the Mexican War and their male descendants (est. 1847).

Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States For Union officers of the Civil War and their male descendants (est. 1865).

Military Order of the Stars and Bars For Confederate officers of the Civil War and their male descendants (est. 1936).

Military Order of Foreign Wars For officers of any foreign war and their descendants (est. 1894). (Excluded only officers of the Civil War and Indian Wars. This charter allows for veteran officers of the Spanish War, WWI, WWII, Korean War, Vietnam War, Gulf War, War in Afghanistan, and the War in Iraq thus precluding the need for any new combat officers order.)

Order of the Indian Wars of the United States For officers of the Indian Wars and their male descendants (est. 1896).

These six organizations listed above are, like the MOWW, also open to direct lineal descendants of qualifying officers of their respective war(s). Only the MOWW does not require the officer to be a combat veteran.

References[edit]