click links in text for more info
SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Moores Mill, Alabama

Moores Mill is a census-designated place in Madison County, United States, is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. The population was 5,682 at the 2010 census. Moores Mill is located at 34°49′50″N 86°31′14″W. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 13.8 square miles, of which 13.6 square miles is land and 0.2 square miles is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,178 people, 1,912 households, 1,500 families residing in the CDP; the population density was 373.6 people per square mile. There were 2,030 housing units at an average density of 146.5 per square mile. The racial makeup of the CDP was 77.62% White, 18.58% Black or African American, 1.31% Native American, 0.79% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, 1.58% from two or more races. 0.98% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 1,912 households out of which 38.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.6% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 21.5% were non-families.

18.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.1% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.09. In the CDP, the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 22.4% from 45 to 64, 7.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.8 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $50,292, the median income for a family was $53,750. Males had a median income of $32,303 versus $25,449 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $20,158. About 6.9% of families and 9.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.7% of those under age 18 and 13.8% of those age 65 or over. As of the census of 2010, there were 5,682 people, 2,204 households, 1,673 families residing in the CDP; the population density was 410 people per square mile.

There were 2,354 housing units at an average density of 173.1 per square mile. The racial makeup of the CDP was 70.9% White, 22.6% Black or African American, 1.1% Native American, 1.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.9% from other races, 2.8% from two or more races. 2.4 % of the population were Latino of any race. There were 2,204 households out of which 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 24.1% were non-families. 20.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.9% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 2.97. In the CDP, the population was spread out with 23.2% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 26.9% from 25 to 44, 31.3% from 45 to 64, 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.9 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.2 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $67,449, the median income for a family was $79,010. Males had a median income of $47,981 versus $40,257 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $30,155. About 6.8% of families and 10.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.6% of those under age 18 and 9.5% of those age 65 or over

Live at Ludlow Garage: 1970

Live at Ludlow Garage: 1970 is an album by the Allman Brothers Band. It was recorded live at Ludlow Garage in Cincinnati in April 11, 1970, it was released by Polydor Records on April 20, 1990. The album is noted for having the longest recorded version of "Mountain Jam", at 44 minutes; the entire recording, including an unreleased rendition of "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed", was remastered and released on a 2015 reissue of Idlewild South. "Dreams" - 10:15 "Statesboro Blues" - 8:09 "Trouble No More" - 4:13 "Dimples" - 5:00 "Every Hungry Woman" - 4:28 "I'm Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town" - 9:22 "Hoochie Coochie Man" - 5:23 "Mountain Jam" - 44:00 Gregg Allman - vocals, organ Duane Allman - guitar, slide guitar, vocals on "Dimples" Dickey Betts - guitar Berry Oakley - bass, vocals on "Hoochie Coochie Man" Butch Trucks - drums, percussion Jai Johanny Johanson - drums, percussion "Dreams" "Statesboro Blues" "Trouble No More" "Dimples" "Every Hungry Woman" "I'm Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town" "Hoochie Coochie Man" "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" "Mountain Jam"

High-performance instrumented airborne platform for environmental research

The high-performance instrumented airborne platform for environmental research is a modified Gulfstream V aircraft operated by the Earth Observing Laboratory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. The aircraft was purchased brand-new from Gulfstream Aerospace in 2002 and modified by Lockheed Martin in Greenville, South Carolina over a period of two years, for a total cost of $80 million; the aircraft includes a wing mounted cloud radar which allows researchers a high resolution view into snow producing storms. The aircraft is instrumented to observe and measure clouds from the stratosphere; the HIAPER cloud radar is an airborne, millimeter-wavelength radar capable of cloud remote sensing. Whole air samplers collect air samples for analysis on the ground. Data collected by the 2013 HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations campaign is publicly available. Official website Current location of the HAIPR and other NCAR research aircraft HIPPO Data Archive

Sigbjørn Bernhoft Osa

Sigbjørn Bernhoft Osa was a Norwegian fiddler and traditional folk musician. He was one of the best known Norwegian performers of folk music in the 1900s. Osa was born in Ulvik, Hardanger as the son of fiddler and painter Lars Osa and children's writer Augusta Sophie Hermine Bernhoft, he spent his first years in Valle and moved to Voss when he was six years old. He was married to Kersti Alice Grambo from 1937, to Anne Heggtveit from 1950, he was the father of actress Liv Bernhoft Osa. He died in Voss in 1990. Osa's father was a skilled violin and Hardingfele player, the boy started to play both instruments, he studied violin with Bjarne Brustad in Oslo in Bergen with the academy of Musikselskabet Harmoniens orkester from 1929 to 1930, in Berlin from 1931 to 1932. He made his début as violinist in 1937, he started playing for the radio in the 1940s, recorded more than 350 traditional airs, either on hardingfele or violin, between 1948 and 1978. His airs were based on the Voss tradition, from elder fiddlers such as Sjur Helgeland, Ola Mosafinn or his own father.

He toured in Norway and the United States, with concerts or causeries. He composed a concert for Three fjords, in cooperation with Geirr Tveitt. In the 1970s he cooperated with the rock group "Saft", he published the textbook Hardingfela in 1952. He became Horary Citizen of the U. S. state of Washington in 1968. He received the Arts Council Norway Honorary Award in 1976, he received the Spellemannprisen Honorary Prize. Hardingfela textbook Spelmannsliv autobiography

Serpent Trail

The Serpent Trail is a 64-mile long distance footpath. It runs from Haslemere to Petersfield, which are 11 miles apart in a straight line, by a route, designed to join up the many heathland areas on greensand in the western Weald; the path takes its name both from its serpentine shape and from passing through habitat of all three British species of snake. From Haslemere High Street the trail goes south to Blackdown westward through Marley Common, Linchmere Common, Stanley Common and Chapel Common to Rake. South of Rake the trail turns east, heading over Fyning Hill to Iping Marsh, Woolbeding Common, Henley Common, Bexley Hill and Leggatt Hill to Upperton Common. From Upperton to Petworth the official route follows the public road, but many walkers may prefer to cross Petworth Park, which can be entered down some steps by the southernmost house in Upperton. A tunnel on the northern side of Petworth House leads into the town, as do the lodge gates south of the house. From the east side of Petworth the trail crosses the Shimmings valley and climbs the sandstone ridge, passing through Flexham Park to Bedham, where it turns southward in a gentle descent to Fittleworth passing, at its easternmost part, close to Brinkwells, the former home of composer Sir Edward Elgar.

From Lower Fittleworth the trail crosses the River Rother and follows the greensand stratum that lies between the river and the South Downs escarpment, passing through Sutton Common, Burton Park, Duncton Common, Lavington Common, Graffham Common and Heyshott Common to Cocking Causway. Crossing the A286 the trail skirts the west side of Midhurst to Midhurst Common and passes through Stedham Common, Iping Common and Trotton Common to Dumpford; the trail continues along Dumpford Lane to Nyewood crosses farmland to West Heath Common, reaching the A272 road at Durleighmarsh passing the site of Durford Abbey to Heath Common at Petersfield, ending at Heath Pond. The trail is waymarked with white plastic discs showing a snake in the approximate shape of the route on a purple triangle. Serpent Trail The Serpent Trail Official Guide www.serpenttrailrace.com - Trail Running races that take place on the Serpent Trail, from all 100k of it to 10k

Countess Amalie Elisabeth of Hanau-Münzenberg

Amalie Elisabeth of Hanau-Münzenberg was Landgravine consort and Regent of Hesse-Kassel. She married the future William V, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel in 1619. Upon her husband's death in 1637, she became regent for their son William VI. Through skillful diplomacy and military successes in the Thirty Years' War, she advanced the fortunes of Hesse-Kassel and handed over an enlarged landgraviate to her son upon his majority in 1650. However, her health was ruined by the war, she died in 1651. Amalie Elisabeth was born in 1602 to Philip Louis II, Count of Hanau-Münzenberg and Countess Catharina Belgica of Nassau, her mother was a daughter of William the Silent, who had led the war of independence of the Netherlands against the Habsburgs in the 16th century. Through her mother's numerous siblings, Amalie Elisabeth was related to many of the noble houses of Europe; these included the Reformation-minded Wittelsbachs in Heidelberg, where she lived for a while with her aunt, Countess Louise Juliana of Nassau, married to Frederick IV, Elector Palatine.

After the early death of her father in 1612, she returned to Hanau. She stayed for a long time with her relatives in the Netherlands. In 1617 Albrecht Jan Smiřický von Smiřice appeared at the court in Hanau, to ask Amalie Elisabeth to marry him; as this had not been discussed, the status and rank of the Bohemian aristocratic title was not clear in Hanau, this caused some confusion. Albrecht Johann Smiřický was after all Protestant, one of the richest landowners of Bohemia. So they became engaged. Albrecht Johann Smiřický was one of the six Bohemian nobles at the second defenestration of Prague who threw the Emperor's representative from a window, the beginning of the Thirty Years' War, he was one of the possible candidates for the Bohemian crown. Albrecht Johann Smiřický died, before the Winter King Frederick V was defeated. There was a quarrel between Amalie Elisabeth and his heirs over his inheritance, which came to an end when the Habsburgs confiscated it in 1621. Amalie Elisabeth married in 1619 the Landgrave William V of Hesse-Kassel.

After his father Maurice abdicated, William in 1627 became ruler of Hesse-Kassel. In the Thirty Years' War, William fought on the Protestant side. After Imperial and Spanish troops' success against Sweden in the 1634 Battle of Nördlingen, he lost his most powerful ally, he was still one of three rulers who refused to accept the Peace of Prague in 1635, he now allied with the French. In the further course of the war he liberated the city of Hanau on 13 June 1636 from a siege by Imperial troops. However, he was defeated by the Emperor's troops and had to withdraw to his possessions in Frisia. During this flight and Amalie Elisabeth had to leave their little daughters Amelia and Elisabeth behind in Kassel. Amalie Elisabeth only saw her daughters again three years later. William V had by this point died in Leer at age 36, his will named his wife as regent for his still underage son, William VI. The most important instrument of power he left his wife was a well-led army, able to flee to Frisia. William V's successor in Hesse-Kassel was his 8-year-old son, Landgrave William VI.

Until he reached adulthood 1650, Amalie Elisabeth ran the government in his place. She proved to be a energetic regent. Despite the sorry state of affairs in 1637, she managed to not only preserve the Landgraviate for her son, but to consolidate it, she first had the troops located in Frisia swear fealty to the new Landgrave, received recognition of her regency by the government in Kassel, despite the rival claim by George II of Hesse-Darmstadt. As regent, Amalie Elisabeth continued to be allied like her husband, she still retained the valuable army. She agreed a cease-fire with the Emperor, but in 1639 and 1640 accepted offers of alliance from Cardinal Richelieu and Duke Bernard of Saxe-Weimar, which broke her agreement with the Emperor. Through a skilled policy of alliances, Hesse-Kassel again became a leading power in the German Protestant camp. Against her relatives in Hesse-Darmstadt she started the conflict over Upper Hesse again. With legal expert opinions she showed. On 6 March 1645, troops of Kassel marched into Upper Hesse.

It was the start of the "Hessian War". The army of Landgrave George II was defeated by the experienced attackers; the peace treaty between both parts of Hesse of 1648 was confirmed in the Peace of Westphalia. Hesse-Kassel received a quarter of Upper Hesse, with Marburg. Backed by Sweden and France, Hesse-Kassel received for its army of 20,000 men a compensation payment of half a million thalers, the only German territory to do so. Hersfeld Abbey and parts of the County of Schaumburg now were part of the Landgraviate of Hesse-Kassel; until it was assumed that Amalie Elisabeth was one of the driving forces in peace negotiations, demanding the Reformed confession's equal recognition as the Lutherans and Roman Catholics. Recent research has shown; the cost of Hanau's liberation during the siege in 1636 brought Amalie Elisabeth back to the Hanauer court. Unable to pay, Hanau pledged the Hanauer Schwarzenfels Office and the Naumburg Cellar as compensation. In 1642, the last of the Hanau-Münzenberg counts died, the distantly related counts of Hanau-Lichtenberg assumed their legacy.

The new countess honored the agreement, Amalie Elisabeth received the inheritance from Hesse-Kassel and the county of Hanau. If the Count of Hanau-Lichtenberg died, Hanau-Münzenberg would belong to Hesse-Kassel, which took place in 1736, her efforts during the war and th