Morrison Avenue–Soundview (IRT Pelham Line)

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 Morrison Avenue–Soundview
 "6" train
New York City Subway station
Morrison Avenue - 6 Train Arrives.jpg
A R142A 6 train arriving at Morrison Avenue
Station statistics
Address Morrison Avenue & Westchester Avenue
Bronx, NY 10472
Borough The Bronx
Locale Soundview
Coordinates 40°49′46″N 73°52′28″W / 40.829495°N 73.874474°W / 40.829495; -73.874474Coordinates: 40°49′46″N 73°52′28″W / 40.829495°N 73.874474°W / 40.829495; -73.874474
Division A (IRT)
Line IRT Pelham Line
Services       6 all times (all times)
Transit connections Bus transport NYCT Bus: Bx4, Bx4A, Bx27
Structure Elevated
Platforms 2 side platforms
Tracks 3
Other information
Opened May 30, 1920; 98 years ago (1920-05-30)
Rebuilt February 8, 2010; 8 years ago (February 8, 2010) to September 13, 2010; 7 years ago (September 13, 2010)
Station code 368[1]
Former/other names Sound View Avenue
Morrison–Sound View Avenues
Morrison Avenue–Sound View Avenue
Traffic
Passengers (2017) 2,125,767[2]Decrease 0.5%
Rank 234 out of 425
Station succession
Next north St. Lawrence Avenue: 6 all times
Next south Elder Avenue: 6 all times

Morrison Avenue–Soundview[3] is a local station on the IRT Pelham Line of the New York City Subway. It is served by the 6 train at all times and is located at Morrison Avenue and Westchester Avenue in the Soundview neighborhood of the Bronx.

History[edit]

The station opened on May 30, 1920 as Sound View Avenue and has also been known as Morrison Avenue–Sound View Avenue and Morrison–Sound View Avenues.[4] The station was opened as the Pelham Line was extended to East 177th Street from Hunts Point Avenue,[5][6] the construction of the Pelham Line was part of the Dual Contracts, signed on March 19, 1913 and also known as the Dual Subway System.[7] The Pelham Line was built as a branch of the Lexington Avenue Line running northeast via 138th Street, Southern Boulevard and Westchester Avenue.[8] Initially, service to the extension was served by a shuttle service operating with elevated cars. Passengers transferred to the shuttle at Hunts Point Avenue.[9]

In 1981, the MTA listed the station among the 69 most deteriorated stations in the subway system.[10]

Station layout[edit]

Track layout
P
Platform level
Side platform, doors will open on the right
Southbound local "6" train toward Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall (Elder Avenue)
Peak-direction express "6" express train does not stop here →
Northbound local "6" train toward Parkchester (PM rush) or Pelham Bay Park (other times) (St. Lawrence Avenue)
Side platform, doors will open on the right
M Mezzanine Fare control, station agent, MetroCard machines
G Street level Exit/entrance
Southwest street entrance

This elevated station has three tracks and two side platforms, the center track is used by the <6> train on weekdays in the peak direction.[11] The platforms have beige windscreen, green canopies, and red roofs in the center and waist-level black steel fence at both ends.

Exits[edit]

Two staircases from each platform lead to the wooden elevated mezzanine beneath the tracks, the station house has a turnstile bank, token booth, and three street staircases to all four corners of Morrison and Westchester Avenues except for the southeast one.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Station Developers' Information". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved June 13, 2017. 
  2. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2012–2017". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 12, 2018. Retrieved July 12, 2018. 
  3. ^ "Subway Map" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. January 18, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018. 
  4. ^ "Bronx Subway Extension Opened" (PDF). New York Times. May 28, 1920. Retrieved January 25, 2016. 
  5. ^ Brooklyn Daily Eagle Almanac. Brooklyn Daily Eagle. 1922. p. 372. 
  6. ^ Annual Report for the Year Ending June 30, 1920. Interborough Rapid Transit Company. 1920. pp. 5, 13. 
  7. ^ nycsubway.org—The Dual Contracts
  8. ^ "The Dual System of Rapid Transit (1912)". www.nycsubway.org. Retrieved March 25, 2014. 
  9. ^ Cunningham, Joseph; DeHart, Leonard O. (1993). A History of the New York City Subway System. J. Schmidt, R. Giglio, and K. Lang. p. 48. 
  10. ^ Gargan, Edward A. (June 11, 1981). "AGENCY LISTS ITS 69 MOST DETERIORATED SUBWAY STATIONS". The New York Times. Retrieved August 13, 2016. 
  11. ^ Dougherty, Peter (2006) [2002]. Tracks of the New York City Subway 2006 (3rd ed.). Dougherty. OCLC 49777633 – via Google Books. 
  12. ^ "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Bronx Zoo" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved July 20, 2016. 

External links[edit]