Mount Somma

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Mount Somma
Monte Somma
Monte Somma S.Maria.jpg
Highest point
Elevation 1,132 m (3,714 ft)
Coordinates 40°49′18″N 14°25′34″E / 40.82167°N 14.42611°E / 40.82167; 14.42611Coordinates: 40°49′18″N 14°25′34″E / 40.82167°N 14.42611°E / 40.82167; 14.42611
Geography
Mount Somma is located in Italy
Mount Somma
Mount Somma
Italy
Location Province of Naples, Italy
Parent range Somma-Vesuvius
Geology
Age of rock 25,000 years before present

Mount Somma is a mountain located in the Province of Naples, in the Campania region.

Mount Somma is an integral part of the volcanic complex "Somma-Vesuvius." It has a recorded height of 1,132 metres (3,714 ft).

Geography[edit]

Mount Somma is the remnant of a large volcano, out of which the peak cone of Mount Vesuvius has grown. Currently, Mount Somma appears to be spread in a semicircle around the north side and north-east of Vesuvius. Vesuvius's formation began during the collapse Caldera of Mount Somma.

Coming from the east, you will encounter the first ridges:

  • the "Cognoli di Trocchia" (961 m)
  • the "Cognoli di Sant'Anastasia" (1,086 m)
  • the "Punta del Nasone (Tip of the nose)" (1,132 m)
  • the "Cognoli di Ottaviano" (1,112 m)

Punta del Nasone[edit]

The highest point of Mount Somma, at 1,132 meters, is called "Punta del Nasone" because of its similarity with a nose covered in the profile of a face lying along the top of the mountain, this similarity can be seen by looking the Mount Somma from the peak of Vesuvius.

Lava flows of 1944[edit]

In March 1944, a spectacular lava flow interrupted the north outline of the mountain down to the town of San Sebastiano al Vesuvio. A fascinating hiking trail (No. 9 in the numbering of the Vesuvius National Park) allows visitors to cross the entire large path of almost 200 meters.

The Olivella[edit]

The Olivella is a village more than 400m north of Mount Somma, in the territory of the municipality of Sant'Anastasia, it looks like a natural amphitheater on top of which is located above the outlet Olivella source, a short distance to the outlet is higher than the outlet of the source surmounted by a stone arch that was part of the aqueduct, when at the time Ferdinando of Bourbon wanted to get the water to Naples.

History[edit]

The first evidence of volcanic activity in this area dates back about 400,000 years ago, but the first major eruptive phenomenon of some significance occurred about 25,000 years ago: the eruption of pumice base when the top of the Somma volcano collapsed forming a caldera, in which later formed Vesuvius. Today the caldera is only the northern side, which is Mount Somma.

Tourism[edit]

Since 1995, Mount Somma has been part of the Vesuvius National Park.