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Museum of Primitive Art

The Museum of Primitive Art, is a now defunct museum devoted to the early arts of the indigenous cultures of Africa, the Americas, Asia and Oceania. It was founded in 1954 by Nelson Rockefeller; the museum opened to the public in 1957 in a townhouse on at 15 West 54th Street in New York City. Robert Goldwater was the museum’s first director; the museum closed in 1976, its collections were transferred to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Lowman, Displays of Power: Art and War among the Marings of New Guinea, New York, Museum of Primitive Art, 1973. Mead, Technique & personality, New York, Museum of Primitive Art, 1963. Metropolitan Museum of Art, Art of Oceania and the Americas from the Museum of Primitive Art: student preparation materials, New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1969. Museum of Primitive Art, Rituals of Euphoria: Coca in South America. Museum of Primitive Art, Art of Oceania and the Americas, from the Museum of Primitive Art, New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1969. Museum of Primitive Art, The Great Bieri, New York, Museum of Primitive Art, 1962.

Museum of Primitive Art, Masterpieces in the Museum of Primitive Art: Africa, North America, Central to South America, New York, Museum of Primitive Art, 1965. Museum of Primitive Art, Primitive Art Masterworks, New York, American Federation of Arts, 1974. Museum of Primitive Art, Sculpture from Mexico Selected from the Collection of the Museum of Primitive Art, New York, Museum of Primitive Art, 1964. Museum of Primitive Art, Sculpture from Peru Selected from the Collection of the Museum of Primitive Art, New York, Museum of Primitive Art, 1964. Museum of Primitive Art, Sculpture from the South Seas in the Collection of the Museum of Primitive Art", New York, Museum of Primitive Art, 1962. Museum of Primitive Art, Selected Works from the Collection, New York, The Museum of Primitive Art, 1957. Museum of Primitive Art, Traditional Art of the African Nations in the Museum of Primitive Art, New York, Museum of Primitive Art, 1961. Museum of Primitive Art, Sculpture from Africa in the Collection of the Museum of Primitive Art, New York, Museum of Primitive Art, 1963.

Newton, Malu Openwork Boards of the Tshuosh Tribe, New York, Museum of Primitive Art, 1963. Newton, New Guinea Art in the Collection of the Museum of Primitive Art, New York, Museum of Primitive Art, 1967. Museum of Primitive Art catalogs digitized and available through The Metropolitan Museum of Art Libraries

Martha Bronson

Martha Bronson is a fictional recurring character in the American television sitcom Leave It to Beaver. "Aunt Martha," as she is known in the series, appears in five of the show's 234 episodes and is mentioned but not seen. The character is portrayed by Madge Kennedy. In the 1997 film adaptation of the series, Leave It to Beaver, Aunt Martha is played by Barbara Billingsley. Billingsley portrayed June Cleaver in the original series. Aunt Martha is June Cleaver's spinster aunt. June credits Martha with raising her and says Aunt Martha was the only mother she knew. June spent summers as a girl with her. Beaver was named for Aunt Martha's brother, and, in one episode, Beaver receives her brother's heirloom ring; the boys call Martha their "umbrella aunt". Martha lives within a few hours of Mayfield at Riverside. In one episode, the boys take a train trip to her house, and, in another episode, Beaver visits her for the weekend. Martha makes her first appearance in the first season episode, "Beaver's Short Pants" when she steps in to take care of Ward and the boys while June visits an out-of-town sister who has given birth.

Martha's "old maid" mindset and way of doing things irks the rugged Cleaver males. Martha prepares milk toast for breakfast, for example, eggplant for dinner, she insists on buying Beaver a short pants suit for school. Beaver is ridiculed by his classmates. In this episode, Aunt Martha was picked up at the airport so she lived further away than Riverside. In another episode and her friend, Mrs. Hathaway, visit the Cleavers on short notice; the boys are forced to cancel plans to attend a carnival with their pals. In her final appearance, Martha presses her wish that Beaver attend a hoity toity prep school on the east coast. Although Beaver gives the idea some consideration, he tells Martha he would rather attend Mayfield High with the friends he has known for years. In another inconsistency, Aunt Martha is sometimes referred to as living in Bellport. In The New Leave It To Beaver Aunt Martha appears in 2 episodes, she is played by Irene Tedrow. In a previous series, Professional Father, in which Billingsley played the wife of a child psychologist, there was an "Aunt Martha", the aunt of Billingsley's character.

"Beaver's Short Pants": Aunt Martha buys Beaver a short pants suit for school. "Train Trip": Aunt Martha sees the boys off when they return home after paying her a visit. "The Visiting Aunts": Aunt Martha drops by, forcing the boys to cancel plans to attend a carnival. "Beaver the Magician": Beaver visits his aunt after pretending to be turned into a rock. "Beaver's Prep School": Aunt Martha wants Beaver to attend a prep school on the east coast. Applebaum, Irwyn; the World According to Beaver. TV Books, 1984, 1998.. Bank, Frank. Call Me Lumpy: my Leave It To Beaver days and other wild Hollywood life. Addax, 2002.. Colella, Jennifer; the Leave It to Beaver Guide to Life: wholesome wisdom from the Cleavers! Running Press, 2006.. Leave It to Beaver: the complete first season. Universal Studios, 2005. Leave It to Beaver: the complete second season. Universal Studios, 2006. Mathers, Jerry.... And Jerry Mather as "The Beaver". Berkley Boulevard Books, 1998

Ocean Fast Ferries

Ocean Fast Ferries, Inc. is a wholly owned Filipino corporation that operates high-speed crafts known as OceanJet, serving destinations in the Visayas, Luzon region in the Philippines. The company started in the late 90's as Socor Shipping Line, operating one vessel, the M/V Oceanjet 1; the company was not aggressive to expansion until 2001, when the company acquired their second vessel, M/V Oceanjet 2. In the same year, the company changed their name into Ocean Fast Ferries Corporation, they acquired 3 new ships from 2001 to 2003: the sister ships Oceanjet 3, Oceanjet 5 and Oceanjet 6, all built in Hong Kong. Starting 2011, the company continued their expansion, with the arrival of Ocean Jet 8 into service, she was the first among the ships acquired by the company to be designed by Global Marine Design, based in Australia, who manufactured the marine kits of these ships, which were assembled here in the Philippines by Golden Dragon Shipyard, located in Mandaue, Cebu. As of December 2017, the company is serving 10 destinations, has a fleet of 17 vessels.

The company serves 10 different destinations, namely: Bacolod, Negros Occidental Batangas City, Batangas Calapan, Oriental Mindoro Camotes Island, Cebu Cebu City, Cebu Dumaguete, Negros Oriental Iloilo City, Iloilo Ormoc, Leyte Larena, Siquijor Tagbilaran, Bohol Oceanjet presently operates in the following routes: Cebu-Ormoc & Vice Versa Cebu-Tagbilaran-Dumaguete-Larena, Siquijor & Vice Versa Cebu-Camotes & Vice Versa Bacolod-Iloilo & Vice Versa Batangas-Calapan & Vice Versa The company operates a total of 17 vessels, a mix of monohulls and catamarans, making them the largest operator of high-speed crafts in the Visayas region. Official website