NCAA Division III Women's Basketball Tournament

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NCAA Division III Women's Basketball Tournament
NCAA logo.svg
Sport College basketball
Founded 1982
No. of teams 64
Country NCAA Division III (U.S.)
Most recent
champion(s)
Amherst
Official website NCAA.com

The NCAA Division III Women's Basketball Championship is the annual tournament to determine the national champions of women's NCAA Division III collegiate basketball in the United States. It has been held annually since 1982, when the NCAA began to sponsor women's sports at all three levels.

Washington–St. Louis are the most successful program, with five national titles. The current champions are Amherst, who won their second straight national title and third overall in 2018.

History[edit]

1982 Final Four[edit]

Held in Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, the 1982 Women's Final Four Basketball Tournament was the first sponsored by the NCAA. Featuring host Elizabethtown College, Clark College (Massachusetts), Pomona College (California) and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the tournament was played in a classic field house over a three-day period; in the first game of the National Semi-Final, Elizabethtown took control right from the tip-off against Clark and easily cruised to a 71-51 victory. In the second game of the Final Four, Pomona took the lead early in the game, but UNC Greensboro battled back to tie the game at 56 with six minutes to play. UNC Greensboro then went on a run and pulled away for a 77-66 win. Elizabethtown and UNC Greensboro turned the championship game into an epic battle of lead changes and shifts in momentum. Last second heroics by UNC Greensboro sent the game into overtime, but Elizabethtown came up with the final stop in overtime to win 67-66 in overtime. Television coverage was provided by a fledgling ESPN while exclusive radio coverage was provided by KSPC Radio - Pomona College's tiny KSPC sports broadcasting group with Geoff Willis (Pomona '83) and James Timmerman (Pomona '82) providing the play by play and color. ESPN was so embryonic that the game was broadcast multiple times during the following two weeks and ESPN hired the KSPC Radio staff to help with background and color research about the players and the teams.

Results[edit]

NCAA Division III Women's Basketball Championship
Year Finals Site Arena Championship Semifinalists
Champion Score Runner-up
1982
Details
Elizabethtown, PA Thompson Gymnasium Elizabethtown 67–66
(OT)
UNC Greensboro Pomona-Pitzer, Clark
1983
Details
Worcester, MA Kneller Athletics Center North Central (IL) 83–71 Elizabethtown Knoxville, Clark
1984
Details
Scranton, PA John Long Center Rust 51–49 Elizabethtown Salem St, North Central
1985
Details
De Pere, WI Schuldes Sports Center Scranton 68–59 New Rochelle Millikin, St. Norbert
1986
Details
Salem, MA Twohig Gymnasium Salem State 89–85 Bishop (TX) Capital, Rust
1987
Details
Scranton, PA John Long Center UW–Stevens Point 81–74 Concordia–Moorhead Scranton, Kean
1988
Details
Moorhead, MN Memorial Auditorium Concordia–Moorhead 65–57 St. John Fisher UNC-Greensboro, Southern Maine
1989
Details
Danville, KY Alumni Gymnasium Elizabethtown 66–65 Cal State Stanislaus Centre, Clarkson
1990
Details
Holland, MI Dow Center Hope 65–63 St. John Fisher Heidelberg, Centre
1991
Details
St. Paul, MN Schoenecker Arena St. Thomas (MN) 73–55 Muskingum Eastern Connecticut St, Washington (MO)
1992
Details
Bethlehem, PA Johnston Hall Alma 79–75 Moravian Luther, Eastern Connecticut St
1993
Details
Pella, IA Kuyper Gymnasium Central (IA) 71–63 Capital Scranton, St. Benedict
1994
Details
Eau Claire, WI W.L. Zorn Arena Capital 82–63 Washington (MO) UW-Eau Claire, Wheaton (MA)
1995
Details
Columbus, OH Alumni Gymnasium Capital 59–55 UW–Oshkosh St Thomas, Salem State
1996
Details
Oshkosh, WI Albee Hall UW–Oshkosh 66–50 Mount Union St Thomas, New York University
1997
Details
New York City, NY Coles Sports Center NYU 72–70 UW–Eau Claire Capital, Scranton
1998
Details
Gorham, ME Warren Hill Gymnasium Washington (MO) 77–69 Southern Maine Mount Union, Rowan
1999
Details
Danbury, CT Stephen Feldman Arena Washington (MO) 74–65 St. Benedict Salem State, Scranton
2000
Details
Washington (MO) 79–33 Southern Maine St Thomas, Scranton
2001
Details
Washington (MO) 67–45 Messiah Ohio Wesleyan, Emmanuel
2002
Details
Terre Haute, IN Hulbert Arena UW–Stevens Point 67–65 St. Lawrence DePauw, Marymount
2003
Details
Trinity (TX) 60–58[1] Eastern Connecticut State UW-Eau Claire, Rochester
2004
Details
Norfolk, VA Jane P. Batten Student Center Wilmington (OH) 59–53[2] Bowdoin Rochester, UW–Stevens Point
2005
Details
Millikin 70–50[3] Randolph–Macon Southern Maine, Scranton
2006
Details
Springfield, MA Springfield Civic Center Hope 69–56 Southern Maine Scranton, Hardin–Simmons
2007
Details
DePauw 55–52 Washington (MO) Mary Washington, NYU
2008
Details
Holland, MI Holland Civic Center Howard Payne 68–54 Messiah UW–Whitewater, Oglethorpe
2009
Details
George Fox 60–53[4] Washington (MO) TCNJ, Amherst
2010
Details
Bloomington, IL Shirk Center Washington (MO) 65–59[5] Hope Amherst, Rochester
2011
Details
Amherst 64–55 Washington (MO) Christopher Newport, Illinois Wesleyan
2012
Details
Holland, MI DeVos Fieldhouse Illinois Wesleyan 57–48[6] George Fox St Thomas, Amherst
2013
Details
DePauw 69–51 UW–Whitewater Williams, Amherst
2014
Details
Gorham, ME Warren Hill Gymnasium FDU–Florham 80–72[7] Whitman UW-Whitewater, Tufts
2015
Details
Grand Rapids, MI Van Noord Arena Thomas More (vacated)[8] 83–63[9] George Fox Montclair State, Tufts
2016
Details
Indianapolis, IN[n 1] Bankers Life Fieldhouse[n 1] Thomas More 63–51[11] Tufts Amherst, Wartburg
2017
Details
Grand Rapids, MI Van Noord Arena Amherst 52–29 Tufts Christopher Newport, St Thomas
2018
Details
Rochester, MN Mayo Civic Center Amherst[12][13] 65–45 Bowdoin Thomas More, Wartburg

Championships[edit]

School Titles Years
Washington (MO) 5 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2010
Amherst 3 2011, 2017, 2018
DePauw 2 2007, 2013
Hope 2 1990, 2006
Wisconsin-Stevens Point 2 1987, 2002
Capital 2 1994, 1995
Elizabethtown 2 1982, 1989
Thomas More^ 1 2016
Farleigh Dickinson-Florham 1 2014
Illinois Wesleyan 1 2012
George Fox 1 2009
Howard Payne 1 2008
Millikin 1 2005
Wilmington (OH) 1 2004
Trinity (TX) 1 2003
NYU 1 1997
Wisconsin–Oshkosh 1 1996
Central (IA) 1 1993
Alma 1 1992
St. Thomas (MN) 1 1991
Concordia (Moorhead) 1 1988
Salem State 1 1986
Scranton 1 1985
Rust 1 1984
North Central 1 1983

^ 2015 championship vacated by Thomas More

Final Fours[edit]

Appearances School
10 Washington (MO)
8 Scranton
7 Amherst
6 St Thomas (MN)
5 Capital, Southern Maine
4 Elizabethtown, Salem St, Tufts
3 DePauw, Eastern Connecticut St, George Fox, Hope, New York University, Rochester, Thomas More, UW-Eau Claire, UW-Stevens Point, UW-Whitewater
2 Centre, Christopher Newport, Clark, Concordia-Moorhead, Illinois Wesleyan, Messiah, Millikin, Mount Union, North Central (IL), Rust, St Benedict, St John Fisher, UNC-Greensboro, UW-Oshkosh

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Only the final game was held in Indianapolis. The semifinals were held at Performance Arena at Capital University in Columbus, Ohio.[10]

References[edit]

External links[edit]