National Film Award for Best Screenplay

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National Film Award for Best Screenplay
National award for contributions to Indian Cinema
Awarded for Best screenplay for a feature film for a year
Sponsored by Directorate of Film Festivals
Reward(s)
  • Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus)
  • 50,000 (US$700)
First awarded 1967 (Screenplay Writer (Original))
2009 (Screenplay Writer (Adapted))
2009 (Dialogue)
Last awarded 2017
Most recent winner
Highlights
Total awarded 64 (Screenplay Writer (Original))
12 (Screenplay Writer (Adapted))
10 (Dialogue)
First winner S. L. Puram Sadanandan

The National Film Award for Best Screenplay is one of the categories in the National Film Awards presented annually by the Directorate of Film Festivals, the organisation set up by Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in India. It is one of several awards presented for feature films and awarded with Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus). The award is announced for films produced in a year across the country, in all Indian languages. As of 2016, the award comprises a Rajat Kamal, a certificate, and a cash prize of 50,000.[1]

The National Film Awards were established in 1954 to "encourage production of the films of a high aesthetic and technical standard and educational and culture value" and also planned to include awards for regional films.[2][3] The awards were instituted as the "State Awards for Films" but were renamed to "National Film Awards" at the 15th National Film Awards in 1967 and a new category of award for Best Screenplay was introduced, presented with a plaque and a cash prize.[4] At the 57th National Film Awards in 2009, the Screenplay award was reclassified into three different awards: Screenplay Writer (Original), Screenplay Writer (Adapted), and Dialogues.[5] Although the Indian film industry produces films in around twenty languages and dialects,[6] as of 2016, the seventy-three unique writers have been awarded those who have worked in nine major languages: Bengali (eleven awards), Hindi (twenty awards), Malayalam (twelve awards), Marathi (seven awards), Tamil (six awards), Kannada (five awards), English (two awards), Sanskrit and Assamese (one award each).

The inaugural award, in 1967, of this category was presented to S. L. Puram Sadanandan for the Malayalam film Agniputhri.[4] No award was presented at the 23rd National Film Awards (1975).[7] As of 2016, Malayalam author and screenplay writer M. T. Vasudevan Nair holds the record of winning maximum awards in category with four wins for the films: Oru Vadakkan Veeragadha (1989), Kadavu (1991),[8] Sadayam (1992),[9] and Parinayam (1994).[10] Bengali filmmaker Satyajit Ray was presented the award in 1993 posthumously for the film Uttoran;[11] he had earlier received awards for Pratidwandi (1970) and Sonar Kella (1974).[12][13] At the 59th National Film Awards in 2011, Girish Kulkarni awarded the National Film Award for Best Actor and the Best Dialogue for the Marathi film Deool. The film was itself adjudged as the National Film Award for Best Feature Film.[14] In 2015 at the 63rd ceremony, Screenplay Writer (Original) as well as Dialogue was jointly awarded to Juhi Chaturvedi and Himanshu Sharma for their films Piku and Tanu Weds Manu: Returns, respectively.[15]

As of 2016, sixty-three awards have been presented for Original Screenplay writing, eleven for Adapted Screenplay writing, and nine for dialogue. The most recent recipients of the awards are Syam Pushkaran (Screenplay Writer (Original) for Malayalam film Maheshinte Prathikaaram), Sanjay Krishnaji Patil (Screenplay Writer (Adapted) for Marathi film Dashakriya) for its cinematic adaption of a Marathi language novel by the same name by author Baba Bhand, and Tharun Bhascker Dhaassyam (Dialogue for Telugu film Pelli Choopulu) who were honoured at the 64th National Film Awards.[1]

Award[edit]

The first recipient of the award, S. L. Puram Sadanandan, was presented with a plaque and 5000 cash prize.[4] The award was revised in 1973 at the 21st ceremony to include 10,000 cash, a silver medal and a certificate. It was shared by Mrinal Sen and Ashish Burman for their Bengali film Padatik.[16] At the 54th awarding ceremony in 2006, the next revision of the award was declared to include cash remuneration of 50,000 which was presented to Abhijat Joshi, Rajkumar Hirani and Vidhu Vinod Chopra for their Hindi film Lage Raho Munna Bhai in which Mahatma Gandhi's philosophy of non-violence was depicted.[17]

For twelve times, multiple writers were awarded for their work in a single film; Mrinal Sen and Ashish Burman for Padatik (1973), Satyadev Dubey, Shyam Benegal, and Girish Karnad for Bhumika (1977), T. S. Ranga and T. S. Nagabharana for Grahana (1978), Ashok Mishra and Saeed Akhtar Mirza for Naseem (1995), Manoj Tyagi and Nina Arora for Page 3 (2004), Prakash Jha, Shridhar Raghavan, and Manoj Tyagi for Apaharan (2005), Abhijat Joshi, Rajkumar Hirani, and Vidhu Vinod Chopra for Lage Raho Munna Bhai (2006), Gopal Krishan Pai and Girish Kasaravalli for Kanasemba Kudureyaneri (2009), P. F. Mathews and Harikrishna for Kutty Srank (2009), Anant Mahadevan and Sanjay Pawar for Mee Sindhutai Sapkal (2010), Vikas Bahl, Nitesh Tiwari, and Vijay Maurya for Chillar Party (2011), Bhavesh Mandalia and Umesh Shukla for OMG – Oh My God! (2012).

Shyamoli Banerjee Deb, one of the jury members at the 53rd National Film Awards, filed a petition objecting to the selections in five awards categories; the Best Feature Film in Hindi, the Best First Film of a Director, the Best Actress, the Best Screenplay, and the Best Special Effects. Deb challenged the decision to confer the award to Prakash Jha, Shridhar Raghavan, and Manoj Tyagi for the Hindi film Apaharan and claimed that the film was not in the primary selection list. The Delhi High Court put a stay on the announcement and requested a reply from the Directorate of Film Festivals.[18] Fourteen months later, Justice B. D. Ahmed removed the stay and the award was announced for Apaharan.[19][20][21]

Winners[edit]

Following are the award winners over the years:

Awards legends
Screenplay Writer (Original)
Screenplay Writer (Adapted)
Dialogue
List of award recipients, showing the year (award ceremony), film(s), language(s) and citation
Year Recipient(s) Film(s) Language(s) Citation Refs.
1967
(15th)
S. L. Puram Sadanandan Agniputhri Malayalam  – [4]
1968
(16th)
Pandit Anand Kumar Anokhi Raat Hindi  – [22]
1969
(17th)
Puttanna Kanagal Gejje Pooje Kannada  – [23]
1970
(18th)
Satyajit Ray Pratidwandi Bengali  – [12]
1971
(19th)
Tapan Sinha Ekhonee Bengali  – [24]
1972
(20th)

Gulzar Koshish Hindi  – [25]
1973
(21st)
Mrinal Sen Padatik Bengali  – [16]
Ashish Burman
1974
(22nd)
Satyajit Ray Sonar Kella Bengali  – [13]
1975
(23rd)
No Award [7]
1976
(24th)
Vijay Tendulkar Manthan Hindi  – [26]
1977
(25th)
Satyadev Dubey Bhumika Hindi
For powerfully recreating the biography of an actress, for its rare, psychological insights and understanding of human relationships, for the complex integration of theme, style and dramatic situation into an engrossing whole, which provokes the spectator into a new awareness of the predicament of the working woman in Indian society.
[27]
Shyam Benegal
Girish Karnad
1978
(26th)
T. S. Ranga Grahana Kannada
For Maintaining taunt narrative line without resorting to melodrama and retaining a film grip on the central idea in an action packed film.
[28]
T. S. Nagabharana
1979
(27th)
Sai Paranjpye Sparsh Hindi  – [29]
1980
(28th)
Mrinal Sen Akaler Sandhane Bengali
For effectively combining the terse and pithy dialogue with creation of well-defined, lively characters to convey a poignant story which leaves a lasting impression.
[30]
1981
(29th)
K. Balachander Thanneer Thanneer Tamil
For translating the suffering of the people in drought-affected areas into a gripping visual narrative.
[31]
1982
(30th)
Mrinal Sen Kharij Bengali
For its economy of expression in the treatment of a sensitive theme.
[32]
1983
(31st)
G. V. Iyer Adi Shankaracharya Sanskrit
For its rich texture, lyricism and cinematic elegance in its presentation of Shankaracharya as an embodiment of greatness.
[33]
1984
(32nd)
Adoor Gopalakrishnan Mukhamukham Malayalam  – [34]
1985
(33rd)
Bhabendra Nath Saikia Agnisnaan Assamese
For the powerful rendering of the saga of a woman who goes through the revolution against the prevailing social mores and comes to terms with herself.
[35]
1986
(34th)
Buddhadeb Dasgupta Phera Bengali
For its penetrative and sensitive screenplay depicting the trauma faced by an artist in search of his identity in relation to his professional and personal life.
[36]
1987
(35th)
Adoor Gopalakrishnan Anantaram Malayalam
For the precision in structuring a very complex narrative content requiring both exceptional dramatic and literary skills.
[37]
1988
(36th)
Arundhati Roy In Which Annie Gives It Those Ones English
For capturing the anguish prevailing among students of professional institutions.
[38]
1989
(37th)
M. T. Vasudevan Nair Oru Vadakkan Veeragatha Malayalam
For the gripping plot, clearly etched characterisations and the brilliant portrayal of life in Kerala a few hundred years ago.
[39]
1990
(38th)
K. S. Sethumadhavan Marupakkam Tamil
For depicting a simplistic story, capturing the various levels of philosophy, psychology, tradition and relationships perfectly.
[40]
1991
(39th)
M. T. Vasudevan Nair Kadavu Malayalam
For its sensitive and poetic treatment of disillusionment of an underprivileged adolescent.
[8]
1992
(40th)
M. T. Vasudevan Nair Sadayam Malayalam
For an extremely well structured script.
[9]
1993
(41st)
Satyajit Ray (Posthumously) Uttoran Bengali
For designing and structuring a screenplay from an imaginative and aesthetic angle, with a superb control over the unity of impressions.
[11]
1994
(42nd)
M. T. Vasudevan Nair Parinayam Malayalam
For his masterly use of fiction in cinema, reconstructing pre-1940s Kerala through sharply defined characters and remarkable control over dialogue.
[10]
1995
(43rd)
Ashok Mishra Naseem Hindi
For their masterly and sensitive visual narration of a volatile and confused situation of the year 1992 in India with great depth and simplicity of words.
[41]
Saeed Akhtar Mirza
1996
(44th)
Agathiyan Kadhal Kottai Tamil
For tightly knit and smooth flowing plot with excellent dialogues and razor-sharp tuning.
[42]
1997
(45th)
Rituparno Ghosh Dahan Bengali
For tactfully crafting a sensitive theme that dwells upon an incident which raises issues of social responsibility and personal awareness.
[43]
1998
(46th)
Ashok Mishra Samar Hindi
For Hindi film Samar where he has used a unique structure to ekplore the complek contradictions of urban/rural, rich/poor, pcwerful/dcwntrodden in a simple story line laced with poignant Moments of humour and irony for a perceptive insight into contemporary indian life.
[44]
1999
(47th)
Madampu Kunjukuttan Karunam Malayalam
For expressing with extreme economy and skilful cinematic treatment a story based on a sensitive screenplay woven around an old couple.
[45]
2000
(48th)
P. Bharathiraja Kadal Pookkal Tamil
For focusing, in present times of degeneration, on love, sacrifice and family values.
[46]
2001
(49th)
G. Neelakanta Reddy Show Telugu
For the film, which seems to probes a real – unreal dramatic situation involving two characters full of emotion and conflicts, with a rare touch of artistic sensitivity.
[47]
2002
(50th)
Aparna Sen Mr. and Mrs. Iyer English
For its fluid narration of the nuances of an ambiguous relationship in troubled times.
[48]
2003
(51st)
Gautam Ghose Abar Aranye Bengali
For weaving together the strands of time creating a resonant dialogue between the past and the present.
[49]
2004
(52nd)
Manoj Tyagi Page 3 Hindi
For telling a complex story in a stunningly simple manner. It takes you into the empty shallow world of Page 3, in a manner which is funny yet deeply empathetic.
[50]
Nina Arora
2005
(53rd)
Prakash Jha Apaharan Hindi
For creating a crisp screenplay that is riveting and renders pace to the entire film.
[19]
Shridhar Raghavan
Manoj Tyagi
2006
(54th)
Abhijat Joshi Lage Raho Munnabhai Hindi
For the original vision with which Gandhi's philosophy of non-violence is given life in popular parlance.
[17]
Rajkumar Hirani
Vidhu Vinod Chopra
2007
(55th)
Feroz Abbas Khan Gandhi, My Father Hindi
For the imaginative and emotional handling of uncompromisingly steadfast side of the Father of the Nation with special reference to his relationship with his troublesome son.
[51]
2008
(56th)
Sachin Kundalkar Gandha Marathi
For its remarkable integration of three different plots using the sense of smell at as a liet motif to focus sensitively on human relationships.
[52]
2009
(57th)
P. F. Mathews Kutty Srank Malayalam
For the mysterious narrative that weaves together multiple perspectives to create a coherent whole, and yet leaves a haunting ambiguity.
[5]
Harikrishna
Gopal Krishan Pai Kanasemba Kudureyaneri Kannada
For linking the theme of death and its inevitability through a narrative style that presents two versions of the same event, not necessarily in chronological order.
Girish Kasaravalli
Pandiraj Pasanga Tamil
For the conversational quality with its cutting edge wit and life like freshness.
2010
(58th)
Vetrimaaran Aadukalam Tamil
For its kaleidoscopic variety that uses realism, tradition and contemporaneity, soaked in local flavour on an infinite canvas.
[53]
Anant Mahadevan Mee Sindhutai Sapkal Marathi
For retaining the concerns and values of a biographical account while translating it into the cinematic medium and honouring the essence of the original.
Sanjay Pawar
Sanjay Pawar Mee Sindhutai Sapkal Marathi
For bringing to life the textures of various characters through articulating their emotion and thought process.
2011
(59th)
Vikas Bahl Chillar Party Hindi
For a charming and utterly professional construct of an engaging middle class urban narrative that neatly delivers the values of compassion, friendship, loyalty, commitment and imagination in the world of children. They use familiar spaces, characters and situations to create an entertaining and surprising fabric of a caring society that still believes in what is good and right.
[14]
Nitesh Tiwari
Vijay Maurya
Avinash Deshpande Nigdi Shala Marathi
For the cinematic adaptation of a literary work that encompasses several issues and characters is always a challenging task. He skilfully transforms the descriptive power of the literary text into a cinematic narrative of layered and tender moments. Despite a range of characters and subplots, the screenplay engagingly links the lives of its teenage protagonists to the repressive context of the National Emergency.
Girish Kulkarni Deool Marathi
For its immensely varied and textured use of language that is both an authentic and an energetic reflection of the different sections of life shown in the film: the language of the village, of politicians, of the scholar and much else. His dialogues – robustly rustic yet influenced by urban vocabulary – is characteristic of the Indian scene today.
2012
(60th)
Sujoy Ghosh Kahaani Hindi
A well structured screenplay that formed the heart of an edge of the seat suspense film.
[54]
Bhavesh Mandalia OMG - Oh My God! Hindi
A carefully crafted screenplay dealing with a social satire with shades of oriental philosophy.
Umesh Shukla
Anjali Menon Ustad Hotel Malayalam
Easy flowing, yet down to earth dialogues complement the well mounted entertainer with a social message.
2013
(61st)
P. Sheshadri December-1 Kannada
For its kaleidoscopic variety that uses realism and colloquialism that is soaked in a contemporary flavour.
[55]
Panchakshari Prakruti Kannada
For retaining the concerns and values of an original work by a celebrated author while adapting it into the cinematic idiom.
Sumitra Bhave Astu Marathi
For an extraordinary blend in language and conversations that cover philosophy day-to-day anxieties and emotions in a most compelling manner.
2014
(62nd)
Srijit Mukherji Chotushkone Bengali
Chotushkone for the masterful telling of a taut suspense thriller which weaves a sinister web around the journey and lives of four egotistical characters.
[56]
Joshy Mangalath Ottaal Malayalam
Ottal for beautifully transposing Anton Chekov’s short story onto a canvas of nature that enhances the shades of the original.
Vishal Bhardwaj Haider Hindi
Haider for the multi layered and resonant dialogues that evoke angst and passion with crispness and brevity.
2015
(63rd)
Juhi Chaturvedi Piku Hindi
For effortless movement of the plot structure, and natural repartees which happens in a delightful love/ hate relationship of a father and daughter.
[15]
Himanshu Sharma Tanu Weds Manu: Returns Hindi
For The writer's interpretation of love story set in a small town, becomes populated with interesting characters and their dialogues and dialects.
Vishal Bhardwaj Talvar Hindi
For the dramatic structure devised by this writer effectively mirrors the tragedy of a family when their daughter is found murdered.
Juhi Chaturvedi Piku Hindi
For effortless movement of the plot structure, and natural repartees which happens in a delightful love/ hate relationship of a father and daughter.
Himanshu Sharma Tanu Weds Manu: Returns Hindi
For The writer's interpretation of love story set in a small town, becomes populated with interesting characters and their dialogues and dialects.
2016
(64th)
Syam Pushkaran Maheshinte Prathikaaram Malayalam
The screenplay interweaves the various idiosyncrasy of a small town near Idukki river.
[1]
Sanjay Krishnaji Patil Dashkriya Marathi
The film brings out a semblance of 'time' and 'place' specified in the novel by Baba Bhand.
Tharun Bhascker Dhaassyam Pelli Choopulu Telugu
The film has incorporated a Modern, Witty and 'on-your-face' dialogue that too with the local flavor.
2017
(65th)
Sajeev Pazhoor Thondimuthalum Driksakshiyum Malayalam
Jayaraj Bhayanakam Malayalam
Sambit Mohanty Hello Arsi Oriya

References[edit]

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  56. ^ "62nd National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. 24 March 2015. Retrieved 24 March 2015.

External links[edit]