Naval Recruitment Training Agency

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Naval Recruitment Training Agency (NRTA)
Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg
Agency overview
Formed 1944-2005
Preceding agency
Jurisdiction United Kingdom United Kingdom
Headquarters HMNB Portsmouth, England
Agency executive
  • Flag Officer, Training and Recruitment
Parent agency Office of the Second Sea Lord

The Naval Recruitment Training Agency (NRTA) originally called the Naval Training Department [1] was first established in 1944 as a department within the Admiralty it underwent numerous name changes until 1 April 1995 as a new agency of the Navy Department of the British Ministry of Defence. [2] Its role was to contribute to the operational capability of the United Kingdom Armed Forces by recruiting to the Naval Service, delivering training to the Defence community [3] it was administered by the Chief Executive (NRTA)/Flag Officer, Training and Recruitment [4] it was abolished in 2005.

History[edit]

The Navy first established a naval training department in December 1944 under the command of Rear-Admiral John W. Durnford, until 1951 [1] when it was renamed the Department of the Deputy Chief of Naval Personnel(Training) administered by Rear-Admiral Charles F.W. Norris.[1] In 1960 the department was then renamed the Directorate-General, Training until 1969 when it was abolished.[1] In 1972 a new training organization was re-established called the Directorate-General, Naval Manpower and Training placed initially under the command of Vice-Admiral David Williams the directorate lasted until 1994.[1] A new Naval Recruiting and Training Agency (NRTA) was launched in April 1995. It was an agency of the Ministry of Defence (MoD). The chief executive of NRTA was the Flag Officer, Training and Recruitment he also held the joint post of Director-General Naval Training and Education. [5] The agency was headquartered at the Victory Building, HM Naval Base Portsmouth. The agency was responsible for the recruitment and training of personnel for the Royal Navy, and additionally to recruit for the Royal Marines. [6] In addition it managed the Royal Naval Reserve and the University Royal Naval Units. The NRTA provided support to maritime-related youth organisations such as combined cadet forces, recognised sea scout units and volunteer cadet.[7] The Agency was a subsidiary department of the Office of the Second Sea Lord and consisted of 21 training schools.

In command of training[edit]

Director of Naval Training[edit]

Post holders included:[1]

Deputy Chief of Naval Personnel, (Training)[edit]

Post holders included:[1]

Director-General of Training[edit]

Post holders included:[1]

Director-General, Naval Manpower and Training[edit]

Post holders included:[1]

Chief Executives (NRTA) and Flag Officer Training and Recruitment[edit]

Post holders included:[1]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Mackie, Colin. "Royal Navy Senior Appointments from 1865" (PDF). gulabin.com. C. Mackie, June 2018. Retrieved 29 June 2018. 
  2. ^ "Ministry of Defence Agencies". The Army Quarterly and Defence Journal. 125: 198. 22 August 2008. 
  3. ^ Commons, The Committee Office, House of. "House of Commons - Defence - Third Report". publications.parliament.uk. H.M. Government, UK, 14 March 2005. Retrieved 9 February 2018. 
  4. ^ Westminster, Department of the Official Report (Hansard), House of Commons,. "House of Commons Hansard Written Answers for 9 Jun 1997 (pt 13)". publications.parliament.uk. Hansard, 9 June 1997. Retrieved 9 February 2018. 
  5. ^ (ed.), Elayne Coakes ... (2002). Knowledge management in the sociotechnical world : the graffiti continues. London ; Berlin ; Heidelberg ; New York ; Barcelona ; Hong Kong ; Milan ; Paris ; Singapore ; Tokyo: Springer. p. 139. ISBN 9781852334413. 
  6. ^ Inspectorate, Adult Learning. "Inspection Report Naval Recruiting and Training Agency" (PDF). reports.ofsted.gov.uk. OFSTED, H.M. Government UK, 11 March 2005. Retrieved 9 February 2018. 
  7. ^ Heyman, Charles (2006). The Armed Forces of the United Kingdom 2007-2008. Oxford, England: Casemate Publishers. p. 64. ISBN 9781844154890. 
  8. ^ "Vice-Admiral Sir Norman Dalton; Obituary.(Features)". The Times (London, England). 3 February 1992. p. 15. Retrieved 29 June 2018. 
  9. ^ "Obituaries: Rear Admiral George Gay". Daily Telegraph, London. 4 December 2001. Retrieved 29 June 2018. 

Sources[edit]

  • (ed.), Elayne Coakes ... (2002). Knowledge management in the sociotechnical world : the graffiti continues. London ; Berlin ; Heidelberg ; New York ; Barcelona ; Hong Kong ; Milan ; Paris ; Singapore ; Tokyo: Springer. ISBN 9781852334413.
  • Heyman, Charles (2006). The Armed Forces of the United Kingdom 2007-2008. Oxford, England: Casemate Publishers. ISBN 9781844154890.
  • Inspectorate, Adult Learning. "Inspection Report Naval Recruiting and Training Agency" (PDF). reports.ofsted.gov.uk. OFSTED, H.M. Government UK, 11 March 2005.
  • Mackie, Gordon. "Royal Navy Senior Appointments from 1865" (PDF). gulabin.com. Gordon Mackie, p.199. December 2017.
  • "Ministry of Defence Agencies". (2008), The Army Quarterly and Defence Journal. Volume 125. West of England Press, Bristol England.