Nishkramana

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Nishkramana (Sanskrit: निष्क्रमण, Niṣkramaṇa) (literally, first outing) is the sixth of the 16 saṃskāras (sacraments) practiced by the Hindus. On the day of the Nishkramana, a square area in the courtyard from where sun can be seen is plastered with cow dung and clay and the sign of svastika is marked on it; the mother of the child scatters grains of rice over it. The child is brought by a nurse, and the ceremony ends when the father makes the child look at the sun with the sound of the conch-shell and the chanting of Vedic hymns.[1] According to the Manusmriti (II.34), in the fourth month after birth, the Nishkramana of the child should be performed.[2] According to the Yamasmriti, quoted in Viramitrodaya, a child should see the sun in the third month and the moon in the fourth month after birth.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Pandey, R.B. (1962, reprint 2003). The Hindu Sacraments (Saṁskāra) in S. Radhakrishnan (ed.) The Cultural Heritage of India, Vol.II, Kolkata:The Ramakrishna Mission Institute of Culture, ISBN 81-85843-03-1, pp.390-413
  2. ^ Buhler, George (2009) [1886]. The Laws of Manu. BiblioLife. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-559-07692-3.