North American Indian Women's Association

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The North American Indian Women's Association is a non-profit educational and service association, which seeks to promote intertribal-communications, betterment of home, family life and community, betterment of health and education, awareness of Indian cultures, and fellowship among North American Indian people.[1] NAIWA was founded in the summer of 1970 and was the first national Native American women's group.[2][3] Marie Cox (Comanche), from Midwest City, Oklahoma served as founding president at the inaugural meeting, which was held in Fort Collins, Colorado.[4][5] During the 1970s adoption reform was one of its greatest concerns. [6] Cox's presidency was followed by Agnes Dill of the Isleta Pueblo, in New Mexico in 1973,[7] who was in turn succeeded by Mary Jane Fate (Koyukon Athabaskan) from Fairbanks, Alaska in 1975.[8] Only women from federally recognized Indian tribes can be members.[9]

The association named Muriel Hazel Wright the outstanding Indian woman of the 20th century in 1971.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Naiwa
  2. ^ Welch, Judy (June 16, 1977). "Oklahoma Woman Named Top Indian". Arkansas City, Kansas: The Arkansas City Traveler. Retrieved 30 July 2016 – via Newspaperarchive.com. open access publication – free to read
  3. ^ "Conference of Indian Women Set at FSIS Campus Today". Lawton, Oklahoma: The Lawton Constitution. June 16, 1971. p. 13. Retrieved 24 August 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ "Mrs. Fate helps to organize North American Indian unit". Fairbanks, Alaska: Fairbanks Daily News Miner. August 27, 1970. p. 3. Retrieved 24 August 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  5. ^ Google
  6. ^ Google
  7. ^ "Indian Women Convene". Gallup, New Mexico: The Gallup Independent. October 15, 1973. p. 3. Retrieved 24 August 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  8. ^ "Passes Gavel to New President". Albuquerque, New Mexico: The Albuquerque Journal. June 22, 1975. p. 24. Retrieved 24 August 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  9. ^ Britannica
  10. ^ Muriel Hazel Wright, Joey Horsley, FemBio.org, retrieved 8 February 2015