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JĂșlia Paes

Gislaine Fernandes de Sousa Leme, best known as Júlia Paes, is a Brazilian model and former adult actress. Born in São Paulo, Gislaine started her career at 12 as model with stage name Michelle Alves, she appeared in the opening of the telenovela Belíssima in 2006 and took part at the 2007 summer edition of the São Paulo Fashion Week. Dissatisfied with the name, she chose the stage name Júlia Paes as a reference to actress Juliana Paes. Júlia attracted the attention of Brazilian media because of her romantic relationship with Thammy Miranda, daughter of singer Gretchen started a career in adult industry as actress and adult model. In 2009 she was elected by the newspaper A Folha do Motoristaas as "Queen of Taxi Drivers" and crowned by the Governor of São Paulo, Geraldo Alckmin; the same year Paes paraded with the Samba School Praiana in the Carnival of Porto Alegre. In 2009, Júlia started her music career as lead singer of "Sexy Dolls", a girl group inspired by Pussycat Dolls consisting of her, Carol Miranda and Sabrina Boing Boing.

Júlia left "Sexy Dolls" at the end of the same year, motivated by the desire to develop other projects and with doubts about the direction the trio was taking. Júlia is a singer of forró genre, her debut album was released in late 2010 and a follow up album was released at the end of 2011. Julia makes appearances as a DJ. After becoming a born-again Christian, she left the porn industry in 2010, married businessman Gabriel Ribeiro, with whom she had a daughter. Júlia Paes on IMDb Júlia Paes at the Internet Adult Film Database

Iberian 10,000 Metres Championships

The Iberian 10,000 Metres Championships or Iberian Trophy is an annual team track running competition over 10,000 metres, contested between athletes from Portugal and Spain. The event has been held over two separate periods. Launched in 1991, the competition ran for six editions, but was made defunct by the European 10000 Metres Challenge in 1997; that competition was expanded further as the European Cup 10,000m in 2005. A desire to resume a bi-national event saw the relaunch of the original event under the title of the "Iberian Trophy" in 2011; the competition consists of two elements: a team aspect. The team competition is decided by combining the finishing times of each nations four best performing athletes. There are one for each of the sexes. On top of this, the host nation incorporates its nation championship into the race, so the host's leading athlete is declared the national champion. Guest athletes are a common feature and, although their times and finishing positions are recorded, they are not considered part of the international Iberian Trophy race.

Nb1 The 1991 individual women's race was won by guest athlete Delilah Asiago of Kenya. Nb2 The 2011 individual races were won by Kenya guest athletes Vincent Vivian Cheruiyot. Nb3 The 2013 individual women's race was won by guest athletes Trihas Gebre Aunoon of Ethiopia, she became a Spanish citizen

List of Michigan Civil War units

This article provides a list of Michigan military units active during the American Civil War. As a northern state, Michigan was part of the Union, its units were active during the entire length of the war. Units included the Michigan Brigade, which served under George Armstrong Custer during the Gettysburg Campaign. 1st Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 1st Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 1st Michigan Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment - African-American 102nd Regiment United States Colored Troops 2nd Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 3rd Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 3rd Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 4th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 4th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 5th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 6th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 7th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 8th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 9th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 10th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 11th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 11th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 12th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 13th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 14th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 14th Michigan Volunteer Mounted Infantry Regiment 15th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 16th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment - Stockton's Independent Regiment 17th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment - Stonewall Regiment 18th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 19th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 20th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 21st Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 22nd Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 23rd Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 24th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 25th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 26th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 27th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 28th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 29th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment 30th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment Stanton Guard Independent Company 1st Regiment Michigan Volunteer Sharpshooters Hall's Independent Battalion Michigan Volunteer Sharpshooters Brady's Independent Company Michigan Volunteer Sharpshooters Dygert's Independent Company Michigan Volunteer Sharpshooters Jardine's Independent Company Michigan Volunteer Sharpshooters Company "C" 1st United States Sharpshooters Regiment Company "I" 1st United States Sharpshooters Regiment Company "K" 1st United States Sharpshooters Regiment Company "B" 2nd United States Sharpshooters Regiment Company "D" Western Sharpshooters Regiment 1st Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment 2nd Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment 3rd Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment 4th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment 5th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment 6th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment 7th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment 8th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment 9th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment 10th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment 11th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry Regiment 1st United States Lancer Regiment Chandler's Horse Guard 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery Battery "A" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery – Battery "B" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery Battery "C" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery – Battery "D" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery Battery "E" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery Battery "F" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery Battery "G" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery Battery "H" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery – Battery "I" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery Battery "K" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery Battery "L" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery Battery "M" 1st Regiment Michigan Light Artillery 6th Regiment Michigan Volunteer Heavy Artillery 13th Independent Battery Michigan Light Artillery 14th Independent Battery Michigan Light Artillery 1st Regiment Michigan Volunteer Engineers and Mechanics Howland's Company Michigan Volunteer Engineers The Michigan Cavalry Brigade was a brigade of volunteer cavalry during the latter half of the war.

Composed of the 1st, 5th, 6th and 7th Michigan Cavalry Regiments the Michigan Brigade fought in every major campaign of the Army of the Potomac from the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863 to the Confederate surrender at Appomattox Court House in April 1865. Minor Michigan Cavalry Units of the American Civil War Minor Michigan infantry units of the American Civil War Lists of American Civil War Regiments by State

George Currie (Scottish politician)

George Welsh Currie was British politician. Born in Edinburgh, he was the son of the Reverend James Currie. Following education at the University of Edinburgh he entered business as an accountant, travelled in the United States and South America, he became a strong supporter of Joseph Chamberlain and in 1906 became secretary of the Scottish branch of the Tariff Reform League. When the sitting member of parliament for Leith Burghs, Ronald Ferguson, was appointed Governor-General of Australia in 1914, Currie was chosen by the Scottish Unionist Party to attack the seat at the resulting by-election, he only by a narrow majority of 16 votes. When the next general election was held at the end of 1918, there was a redistribution of parliamentary seats under the Representation of the People Act. Currie stood in the new Leith seat as a supporter of David Lloyd George's coalition government, but lost narrowly to the Liberal candidate, William Wedgwood Benn. Currie was appointed to a number of advisory boards.

Over time he moved politically to the left, in June 1935 was elected to the London County Council as a Labour Party councillor representing Wandsworth Central. He was president of the Chelsea Labour Party from 1936, he resigned from the council in 1939. Outside politics Currie was active in the administration of the Church of England in the Dioceses of London and Guildford, he died at his home in Witley, aged 79. Works by or about George Currie at Internet Archive Hansard 1803–2005: contributions in Parliament by George Welsh Currie

Funeral of Qasem Soleimani

The funeral of Qasem Soleimani, an Iranian major general in the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, was held from 4 to 7 January 2020 in some cities in Iraq and Iran – including Baghdad, Najaf, Mashhad, Tehran and his hometown Kerman. The funeral ceremony of Soleimani in Tehran was described as "the largest in Iran since the funeral of Grand Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini", founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran, in 1989. On 7 January 2020, a stampede took place at the burial procession in Kerman, killing at least 56 mourners and injuring over 200. Soleimani's burial was delayed due to the massive crowds, his body was buried in his hometown of Kerman on Wednesday, 8 January, just hours after Iran attacked two US bases in Iraq. On 5 January, a funeral procession for Qasem Soleimani was held in Baghdad with thousands of mourners in attendance, waving militia and Iraqi flags and chanting "death to America, death to Israel"; the procession started at the Al-Kadhimiya Mosque in Baghdad. Iraq's prime minister, Adil Abdul-Mahdi, leaders of Iran-backed militias attended the funeral procession.

Soleimani's remains were taken to the holy Shia cities of Najaf. Iranian State TV estimated that there were millions of mourners in Ahvaz on 5 January. CNN described the number of mourners who participated in the Tehran funeral with "a sea of people" on Monday. Iranian State TV reported estimates of millions of mourners there; the mourners had Soleimani's photos in their hands, screamed "down with the USA" and "death to the USA". Satellite imagery showed that gathered people stretched from "Azadi Square and for nearly 6 kilometres along Azadi Street in central Tehran". Associated Press journalists estimated "a turnout of at least 1 million" in Tehran. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei prayed over Soleimani's body during the funeral ceremony alongside President of Iran Hassan Rouhani and other officials. General Ismail Qaani cried over his coffin. According to France24, the number of mourners attending the funeral procession in Kerman, Qom and Ahvaz were the same. BBC stated that there were widespread chants of "death to America" and "death to Trump".

During Ayatollah Khomeini's 1989 funeral procession, eight people were killed in a stampede caused in part due to difficulty in containing the massive crowd. Soleimani had asked prior to his death to be buried next to his wartime comrade Mohammad-Hossein Yousefollahi, he asked for a simple gravestone "similar to shahid comrades" and with the inscription "Private Qassem Soleimani", without any honorific title. On 7 January 2020, a stampede crush took place at the burial procession for Soleimani in Kerman, killing at least 56 mourners and injuring more than 200. Head of the burial committee Mehdi Sadafi told the state-run ISNA news agency that Soleimani's burial was cancelled after the deaths. Commenting on photos of the huge crowds in Tehran's funeral, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Iran Javad Zarif tweeted: "Do you still imagine you can break the will of this great nation and its people? End of malign US presence in West Asia has begun." 2020 Baghdad International Airport airstrike 2020 in Iran 2020 Iranian attack on U.

S. forces in Iraq Death and state funeral of Ruhollah Khomeini Reactions to the 2020 Baghdad International Airport airstrike List of largest funerals Media related to Funeral of Qasem Soleimani at Wikimedia Commons