Old House (Cutchogue)

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The Old House
The-old-house-cutchogue.jpg
Old House (Cutchogue) is located in New York
Old House (Cutchogue)
Old House (Cutchogue) is located in the United States
Old House (Cutchogue)
LocationCutchogue, New York
Coordinates41°0′29.4″N 72°29′10.04″W / 41.008167°N 72.4861222°W / 41.008167; -72.4861222Coordinates: 41°0′29.4″N 72°29′10.04″W / 41.008167°N 72.4861222°W / 41.008167; -72.4861222
Built1699
Architectunknown
Architectural styleEnglish domestic
NRHP reference #66000573
Significant dates
Added to NRHPOctober 15, 1966[1]
Designated NHLNovember 5, 1961[2]

The Old House is a historic home on State Route 25 in Cutchogue in Suffolk County, New York. It is "notable as one of the most distinguished surviving examples of English domestic architecture in America."[2]

History[edit]

Debate over origin[edit]

According to the results of a 2003 dendrochronology study, the house was built ca. 1699.[3] Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical Council, the owner of the house, commissioned a second dendrochronology study in July 2017 to verify the build date, with the same results.[4][5]

Prior to 2017 The Old House was thought to have been built by John Budd on land east of town near a pond that became known as Budd Pond. John Budd's daughter Anna and her husband Benjamin Horton were deeded a house in 1658 as a wedding present, they moved it to a location in the village of Cutchogue. Benjamin's brother John inherited the house and sold it to Joseph Wickham in 1699; these events and transactions are well documented.[6]

Post 17th century[edit]

Parker Wickham (February 28, 1727 – May 22, 1785), famous for being a Loyalist politician during the American Revolution and who was banished from the state of New York under dubious circumstances, owned and lived in the house,[7] it was damaged by the Hurricane of 1938 which swept away surrounding trees, leaving it visible from the street and coming to public attention,[5] restored in 1940, and restored again in 1968.[7]

It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1961;[2] the house is located on the Cutchogue Village Green, along with the 1840 Old Schoolhouse, the 1704 Wickham Farmhouse, a barn, the Cutchogue New Suffolk Free Library, a 19th-century carriage house, and the Old Burying Ground dating from 1717. The buildings are owned and maintained by the Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical Council, which gives guided tours in the summer.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  2. ^ a b c "The Old House (Cutchogue)". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. 2007-09-18. Archived from the original on 6 June 2011.
  3. ^ "Dated buildings in New York State Oxford Tree-Ring Laboratory". dendrochronology.net. Retrieved 2018-04-07.
  4. ^ "North Fork History Project: When was Cutchogue's Old House built? | Suffolk Times". suffolktimes.timesreview.com. Retrieved 2018-04-12.
  5. ^ a b "Cutchogue's Old House losing distinction as oldest English-style home in NYS". suffolktimes.com. Retrieved 2018-04-01.
  6. ^ Hall, Warren (1975). Pagans, Puritans, and Patriots of Yesterday’s Southold. Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical Council. ASIN B0006CJTLS.
  7. ^ a b Richard Greenwood (July 14, 1975). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: The Old House" (pdf). National Park Service. and Accompanying 5 photos, exterior, from 1975. (1.53 MB)

External links[edit]

Media related to The Old House (Cutchogue, New York) at Wikimedia Commons