Olive Wyon

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Dr. Olive Wyon (7 March 1881 - 21 August 1966) was a British author and translator of books of the Christian faith.

Life[edit]

She was born in Hampstead, London, into a cultured Victorian family; the daughter of Allan Wyon, Chief Engraver of Seals to Queen Victoria, she had a brother, the Rev. Allan G. Wyon, the sculptor and medalist, and two sisters, one an Anglican Deaconess and the other a Congregational Minister.

Wyon was given an honorary doctorate by the University of Aberdeen for her contribution to theological learning, she died in Edinburgh in 1966, aged 85.

Works[edit]

In 1953, Wyon, a member of the faculty of St. Colm's College, Edinburgh, Scotland published these books: The school of prayer, The world's Christmas, Living springs: New religious movements in Western Europe, Prayer: An answer to the question why should I pray and how do I pray? The dawn wind : a picture of changing conditions among women in Africa and the East, Consider him; three meditations on the Passion story, Radiant freedom; the story of Emma Pieczynska, Teachings toward Christian perfection : introducing three spiritual classics, The grace of the Passion, The altar fire; reflections on the sacrament of the Eucharist, Desire for God : a study of three spiritual classics: Francois Feńelon, "Christian perfection"; John Wesley, "Christian perfection"; Evelyn Underhill, "The spiritual life." An eastern palimpsest : a brief survey of the religious situation in Turkey, Syria, Palestine, Transjordania, Egypt On the way; reflections on the Christian life Praying for unity Prayer and life The church and world peace : principles which should govern a righteous peace settlement The three windows. The story of Ann Hunter Small

She translated the works of theologians Emil Brunner, Adolf von Harnack, Maurice Goguel, Friedrich Heiler, Ernst Robert Curtius, Hanns Lilje, Nils Ehrenström, Jacques Ellul, Ernst Troeltsch, Basilea Schlink, Paul Seippel, Suzanne de Dietrich, Helmut Gollwitzer, and Léopold Malevez.

References[edit]

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