One-shot (comics)

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In the comic book publishing industry, a one-shot is a comic book published as a single, standalone issue, with a self-contained story, and not as part of an ongoing series or miniseries.[1] In the television industry, one-shots sometimes serve as a pilot to field interest in a new series.[citation needed]

Japan[edit]

In the Japanese manga industry, the concept of one-shot is expressed by the term yomikiri (読み切り), which implies that the comic is presented in its entirety without any continuation.[2] One-shot manga are often written for contests, and sometimes later developed into a full-length manga series (much like a television pilot). Many popular manga series began as one-shot stories, including Dragon Ball, Fist of the North Star, Naruto, Bleach, One Piece, Berserk, Kinnikuman and Death Note, among others; some noted manga authors, such as Akira Toriyama and Rumiko Takahashi, have worked on numerous one-shot stories in addition to their serialized works. Rising Stars of Manga was an annual competition for original English-language one-shot manga, many of which have gone on to become full-length manga series.

United States[edit]

In the United States, one-shots are usually labeled with a "#1" despite there being no following issues, and are sometimes subtitled as "specials". On occasion, a character or concept will appear in a series of one-shots, in cases where the subject matter is not financially lucrative enough to merit an ongoing or limited series, but still popular enough to be published on a regular basis, often annually or quarterly. A current example of a series of one-shots would be Marvel Comics' Franklin Richards: Son of a Genius publications; this type of one-shot is not to be confused with a comic book annual, which is typically a companion publication to an established ongoing series.[citation needed]

Other countries[edit]

The term has also been borrowed into the Franco-Belgian comics industry, with basically the same meaning, although there, it mostly refers to albums.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Albert, Aaron. "One Shot Definition" Archived 2012-11-18 at the Wayback Machine. About Entertainment. Retrieved July 8, 2016.
  2. ^ "What is the purpose of one-shot manga?". anime.stackexchange.com.