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Open access in Norway

Open access scholarly communication of Norway can be searched via the Norwegian Open Research Archive. "A national repository consortium, BIBSYS Brage, operates shared electronic publishing system on behalf of 56 institutions." Cappelen Damm Akademisk, Nordic Open Access Scholarly Publishing, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Universitetsforlaget belong to the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association. Norwegian signatories to the international "Open Access 2020" campaign, launched in 2016, include CRIStin, Norsk institutt for bioøkonomi, Norwegian Institute of Palaeography and Historical Philology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Tromsø, University of Bergen, University of Oslo, Wikimedia Norge. There are a number of collections of scholarship in Norway housed in digital open access repositories. Key events in the development of open access in Norway include the following: 2001 26 November: Norwegian Wikipedia, an open educational resource, begins publication.

2003 Norsk Institutt for Palaeografi og Historisk Filologi signs the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities. 2006 Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing begins in Tromsø. 2007 May: OpenAccess.no website launched. 27 June: Ministry of Education and Research State Secretary Lisbet Rugtvedt endorses open access. November: National policy adopted "requiring government agencies to provide open access to any geodata they gather or produce." 2009 Research Council of Norway signs the Berlin Declaration. 2010 CRIStin launched. 2011 18 February: UiT The Arctic University of Norway creates fund to cover author fees. 2013 Research Council of Norway pays for 40 open access journals. Norwegian University of Science and Technology creates fund to cover author fees. 2017 Comparative Research Programme on Poverty, a government agency, begins providing "open access to two of its publications: the CROP Series in International Poverty Poverty Studies and Global Challenges - Working Paper Series."

Aneta Laskowska. 2007-2011 Greater access to Norwegian scientific publications, Norwegian Association of Higher Education Institutions, 2009 Institutional Policy Implementation at UiT. The Arctic University of Norway, PASTEUR4OA Case Study, 2015, doi:10.5281/zenodo.44311 Eelco Ferwerda. "Norway". Gold Open Access by Country 2012-2017. US: Cites & Insights Books. "Norway". Global Open Access Portal. UNESCO. "Browse by Country: Europe: Norway". Registry of Open Access Repositories. UK. "". Directory of Open Access Journals. United Kingdom: Infrastructure Services for Open Access. "Tag "oa.norway"". Open Access Tracking Project. Harvard University. OCLC 1040261573. "Browse by Country: Norway". ROARMAP: Registry of Open Access Repository Mandates and Policies. United Kingdom: University of Southampton. "Our members: Norway". Sparceurope.org. Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition. Pål M. Lykkja, Åpen Vitenskap – via Blogspot Open Access in Norway, DRIVER: Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research, archived from the original on 23 August 2011

Greg Walker (baseball)

Gregory Lee Walker is a former power-hitting first baseman in Major League Baseball. He played in MLB from 1982 to 1990, he is the former hitting coach of the Chicago White Sox, the team for which he played all but the last 14 games of his career, until leaving the White Sox to become the hitting coach for the Atlanta Braves, a position he held from 2012 until 2014. Walker was drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1977, he was selected by the White Sox in the Rule 5 draft in 1979. He was called up to the major leagues in 1982 and spent his entire MLB playing career with the White Sox. In 1988 he had a seizure on the field at Comiskey Park during fielding practice, he was released by Chicago early in the 1990 season and subsequently signed with the Baltimore Orioles. Baltimore released him shortly thereafter. Over his career, Walker hit 113 home drove in 444 runs, while scoring 368 times; when he began his coaching career, he did so with the White Sox Triple-A club in Charlotte. In 2003, he joined the parent club as hitting coach.

After nine seasons serving as the hitting coach of the Chicago White Sox, including their victory in the 2005 World Series, it was announced on October 21, 2011 that Walker was hired by the Atlanta Braves to serve as their hitting coach for the 2012 season. Walker filled the role vacated by the firing of Larry Parrish. Walker resigned in September 2014, as the team compiled a.241 batting average, 573 runs, 123 home runs, 1,369 strikeouts, struggling mightily in the final month of the season. He returned to the Braves as a special assistant of baseball operations in February 2015. Walker is a cousin of a former MLB player. Career statistics and player information from MLB, or ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or Baseball-Reference, or Retrosheet

Kuiseb River

The Kuiseb River is an ephemeral river in western-central Namibia. Its source is in the Khomas Highland west of Windhoek. From there it flows westwards through the Namib-Naukluft National Park and the Namib desert to Walvis Bay. Several settlements of the Topnaar people are situated on the banks of the lower Kuiseb, for instance Homeb, Sandfontein and Utuseb. Inflows of the Kuiseb are Gomab, Chausib, Koam and Goagos; the Kuiseb's catchment area is estimated to be between 15,500 and 16,692 km2. It has a mean run-off of 20 million cubic metres per annum. Friedenau Dam, built in 1972, is located on the river. In January 2005, for the first time in years, the Kuiseb flowed to the ocean. Between Naukluft and Namib the Kuiseb carved out a canyon in a inaccessible area. During World War II the area around the Kuiseb Canyon served as a shelter for Henno Martin and Hermann Korn who moved there to wait the war out. Two books and a film were subsequently published about this 2-year stay. On its course through the Namib the Kuiseb is bordered on one side by some of the tallest sand dunes in the world, on the other by barren rock.

The red sand dunes south of the river reach heights over 150 meters. The prevailing winds blow the dunes northward. In the process, so much sand and silt is deposited in the Kuiseb that it only reaches the sea while it is in flood. In 1907, the area between the Swakop River and the Kuiseb was designated by the German colonial administration as a game reserve; the area is part of the Namib-Naukluft National Park. The Desert Research Foundation of Namibia is located at Gobabeb on the banks of the river. List of rivers of Namibia Malan, Johan S. Die Völker Namibias. Windhoek, Göttingen: Klaus Hess. Moritz, Walter. Verwehte Spuren in der Namibwüste - Alte Ansiedlungen am Kuiseb. Windhoek: Typoprint. ISBN 99916-750-0-0; the original entry was from the NASA Earth Observatory Kuiseb River at the Encyclopædia Britannica NASA Earth Explorer page PhD Dissertation at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Moritz von Engelhardt

Otto Moritz Ludwig von Engelhardt was a Baltic German mineralogist. He was a member of the Engelhardt family, he was born in 1779 in his family's manor Wieso an estate in Estonia. He studied Chemistry at the University of Leipzig and at University of Göttingen. In company with Karl von Raumer he traveled through central Europe and England, in 1811 he undertook a journey with Friedrich Parrot through the Crimea and the Caucasus; the results of his extensive tour through Finland in 1818 were published in the work entitled Geognostischer Umriss von Finland, vol. i. of an elaborately projected Darstellung aus dem Felsgebäude Russlands. From 1820 to 1830 he was professor of mineralogy at Dorpat, in 1826 he entered upon those extensive travels through Russia in the course of which he discovered the vast deposits of gold and diamonds described in his famous reports published at Riga in 1828 and 1830, his other literary productions include a description of his first extensive tour, published by him jointly with his companion Raumer in the works entitled Geognostische Versuche and Geognostische Umrisse.

Engelhardt married two times. His first wife Mary Pierson of Balmadis died young at the age of 25 and he married Catharina Elisabeth Johanna von Müller, he had 6 children in total, one daughter, Alexandra Eveline, with his first wife and 5 more with the second wife. His son, Moritz II became Professor of Theologie at the University of Dorpat

Unigine Corp

Unigine Corp is a Russian multinational software development company headquartered in Tomsk, Russia. It is well known for developing the Unigine Engine proprietary cross-platform middleware; the company has a game development team. Its first title, Oil Rush, was released on January 25, 2012. Unigine Corp is a developer of advanced GPU benchmarks: Unigine Sanctuary Unigine Tropics Unigine Heaven Unigine Valley Unigine Superposition The roots of Unigine are in the personal open source project, initiated in 2002 by Alexander "Frustum" Zapryagaev, a co-founder and CTO of Unigine Corp. Unigine Engine Oil Rush Linux gaming Official website

National Security Act of 1947

The National Security Act of 1947 was a law enacting major restructuring of the United States government's military and intelligence agencies following World War II. The majority of the provisions of the Act took effect on September 18, 1947, the day after the Senate confirmed James Forrestal as the first Secretary of Defense; the Act merged the Department of War and the Department of the Navy into the National Military Establishment, headed by the Secretary of Defense. It created the Department of the Air Force and the United States Air Force, which separated the Army Air Forces into its own service, it protected the Marine Corps as an independent service, under the Department of the Navy. Aside from the military reorganization, the act established the National Security Council and the Central Intelligence Agency, the U. S.'s first peacetime non-military intelligence agency. The National Security Act of 1947 was a major restructuring of the United States government's military and intelligence agencies following World War II.

The act and its changes, along with the Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan, were major components of the Truman administration's Cold War strategy. The bill signing took place aboard Truman's VC-54C presidential aircraft Sacred Cow, the first aircraft used for the role of Air Force One; the majority of the provisions of the Act took effect on September 18, 1947, the day after the Senate confirmed James Forrestal as the first Secretary of Defense. His power was limited and it was difficult for him to exercise the authority to make his office effective; this was changed in the amendment to the act in 1949, creating what was to be the Department of Defense. The Act merged the Department of War and the Department of the Navy into the National Military Establishment, headed by the Secretary of Defense, it created the Department of the Air Force, which separated the Army Air Forces into its own service. It protected the Marine Corps as an independent service, under the Department of the Navy; each of the three service secretaries maintained quasi-cabinet status, but the act was amended on August 10, 1949, to ensure their subordination to the Secretary of Defense.

At the same time, the NME was renamed as the Department of Defense. The purpose was to unify the Army and Air Force into a federated structure; the Joint Chiefs of Staff was established under Title II, Section 211 of the original National Security Act of 1947 before Sections 209–214 of Title II were repealed by the law enacting Title 10 and Title 32, United States Code to replace them. Aside from the military reorganization, the act established the National Security Council, a central place of coordination for national security policy in the executive branch, the Central Intelligence Agency, the U. S.'s first peacetime intelligence agency. The council's function was to advise the president on domestic and military policies, to ensure cooperation between the various military and intelligence agencies. Goldwater–Nichols Act McFarland, Keith D. "The 1949 Revolt of the Admirals." Parameters 11.2: 53+. Stevenson, Charles A. "The Story Behind the National Security Act of 1947." Military Review 88.3: 13+.

Online Stevenson, Charles A. "Underlying assumptions of the National Security Act of 1947." Joint Force Quarterly 48.1: 129-133. Trager, Frank N. "The National Security Act of 1947: Its Thirtieth Anniversary." Air University Review, November–December. Text at the United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Information at the Department of State Bibliography of sources relating to the Act, including many links to online, public-domain sources "National Security Act of 1947". Enrolled Acts and Resolutions of Congress, compiled 1789 - 2008. U. S. National Archives and Records Administration. July 26, 1947