Orders of magnitude (acceleration)

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This page lists examples of the acceleration occurring in various situations, they are grouped by orders of magnitude.

Factor
[m/s2]
Multiple Reference frame Value [g] Item
100 1 m/s2 inertial 0 m/s2 0 g The gyro rotors in Gravity Probe B and the free-floating
proof masses in the TRIAD I navigation satellite[1]
inertial 0 m/s2 0 g Weightless parabola in a reduced-gravity aircraft
lab 5×1014 m/s2 5×1015 g Smallest acceleration in a scientific experiment[2]
lab 0.25 m/s2 0.026 g Train acceleration for SJ X2[citation needed]
inertial 1.62 m/s2 0.1652 g Standing on the Moon at its equator[citation needed]
lab 4.3 m/s2 0.44 g Car acceleration 0–100 km/h in 6.4 s with a Saab 9-5 Hirsch[citation needed]
inertial 9.80665 m/s2 1 g Standard gravity, the gravity acceleration on Earth at sea level standard[3]
101 1 dam/s2 inertial 11.2 m/s2 1.14 g Saturn V moon rocket just after launch[citation needed]
inertial 15.2 m/s2 1.55 g Bugatti Veyron from 0 to 100 km/h in 2.4 s (the net acceleration vector including gravitational acceleration is directed 40 degrees from horizontal[citation needed])
inertial 29 m/s2 3 g Space Shuttle, maximum during launch and reentry[citation needed]
inertial 29 m/s2 3 g Sustainable for > 25 seconds, for a human[3]
inertial 34 – 62 m/s2 3.5 – 6.3 g High-G roller coasters[4]:340
lab? 41 m/s2 4.2 g Top Fuel drag racing world record of 4.4 s over 1/4 mile[citation needed]
inertial 49 m/s2 5 g Causes disorientation, dizziness and fainting in humans[3]
lab? 49+ m/s2 5+ g Formula One car, maximum under heavy braking[citation needed]
inertial? 51 m/s2 5.2 g Luge, maximum expected at the Whistler Sliding Centre[citation needed]
lab 49 – 59 m/s2 5 – 6 g Formula One car, peak lateral in turns[5]
inertial 59 m/s2 6 g Parachutist peak during normal opening of parachute[6]
inertial +69 / -49 m/s2 +7 / -5 g Standard, full aerobatics certified glider[citation needed]
inertial 70.6 m/s2 7.19 g Apollo 16 on reentry[7]
inertial 79 m/s2 8 g F-16 aircraft pulling out of dive[citation needed]
inertial 88 m/s2 9 g Maximum for a fit, trained person with G-suit to keep consciousness, avoiding G-LOC[citation needed]
inertial 88 – 118 m/s2 9 – 12 g Typical maximum turn acceleration in an aerobatic plane or fighter jet[8]
102 1 hm/s2 inertial 147 m/s2 15 g Explosive seat ejection from aircraft[citation needed]
177 m/s2 18 g Physical damage in humans like broken capillaries[3]
209 m/s2 21.3 g Peak acceleration experienced by cosmonauts during the Soyuz 18a abort[9]
333 m/s2 34 g Peak deceleration of the Stardust Sample Return Capsule on reentry to Earth[10]
454 m/s2 46.2 g Maximum acceleration a human has survived on a rocket sled[3]
> 491 m/s2 > 50 g Death or serious injury likely[citation needed]
982 m/s2 100 g Sprint missile[11]
982 m/s2 100 g Automobile crash (100 km/h into wall)[12]
> 982 m/s2 > 100 g Brief human exposure survived in crash[13]
982 m/s2 100 g Deadly limit for most humans[citation needed]
103 1 km/s2 inertial
≈ lab
1540 m/s2 157 g Peak acceleration of fastest rocket sled run[14]
1964 m/s2 200 g 3.5" hard disc non-operating shock tolerance for 2 ms, weight 0.6 kg[15]
2490 m/s2 254 g Peak deceleration experienced by Jules Bianchi in crash of Marussia MR03, 2014 Japanese Grand Prix[16]
2946 m/s2 300 g Soccer ball struck by foot[citation needed]
3200 m/s2 320 g A jumping human flea[17]
3800 m/s2 380 g A jumping click beetle[18]
104 10 km/s2 11 768 m/s2 1200 g Deceleration of the head of a woodpecker[19]
17 680 m/s2 1800 g Space gun with a barrel length of 1 km and a muzzle velocity of 6 km/s,
as proposed by Quicklaunch (assuming constant acceleration)
29460 m/s2 3000 g Baseball struck by bat[12]
>49 100 m/s2 > 5000 g Shock capability of mechanical wrist watches[20]
84 450 m/s2 8600 g Current Formula One engines, maximum piston acceleration[21]
105 100 km/s2 102 000 m/s2 10 400 g A mantis shrimp punch[22]
152 210 m/s2 15 500 g Rating of electronics built into military artillery shells[23]
196 400 m/s2 20 000 g Spore acceleration of the Pilobolus fungi[24]
304 420 m/s2 31 000 g 9×19mm Parabellum handgun bullet (average along the length of the barrel)[citation needed][25]
106 1 Mm/s2 1 000 000 m/s2 100 000 g Closing jaws of a trap-jaw ant[26]
1 865 800 m/s2 190 000 g 9×19mm Parabellum handgun bullet, peak[citation needed][27]
3 800 000 m/s2 390 000 g Surface gravity of white dwarf Sirius B[28]
3 900 000 m/s2 slightly below 400 000 g Ultracentrifuge[29]
107 10 Mm/s2 53 000 000 m/s2 5 400 000 g Jellyfish stinger[30]
1012 1 Tm/s2 7×1012 m/s2 7×1011 g Max surface gravity of a neutron star[citation needed]
2.1×1013 m/s2 2.1×1012 g Protons in the Large Hadron Collider[31]
1021 1 Zm/s2 9.149×1021 m/s2 9.33×1020 g Classical (Bohr model) acceleration of an electron around a 1H nucleus.
176×1021 m/s2 1.79×1022 g Electrons in a 1 TV/m wakefield accelerator[32]
1051 1051 m/s2 5.561×1051 m/s2 5.67×1050 g Planck acceleration[33]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stanford University: Gravity Probe B, Payload & Spacecraft, and NASA: Investigation of Drag-Free Control Technology for Earth Science Constellation Missions. The TRIAD 1 satellite was a later, more advanced navigation satellite that was part of the U.S. Navy’s Transit, or NAVSAT system.
  2. ^ http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.150801
  3. ^ a b c d e csel.eng.ohio-state.edu - High Acceleration and the Human Body, Martin Voshell, November 28, 2004 Archived August 19, 2014, at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ George Bibel. Beyond the Black Box: the Forensics of Airplane Crashes. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008. ISBN 0-8018-8631-7.
  5. ^ 6 g has been recorded in the 130R turn at Suzuka circuit, Japan. [1] Many turns have 5 g peak values, like turn 8 at Istanbul or Eau Rouge at Spa
  6. ^ http://www.pcprg.com/g-forces.htm
  7. ^ NASA: SP-368 Biomedical Results of Apollo, Chapter 5: Environmental Factors, Table 2: Apollo Manned Space Flight Reentry G Levels
  8. ^ "Maxed out: How many gs can you pull?". New Scientist. Retrieved 2017-11-19. 
  9. ^ Hall, Rex; David Shayler (2003). Soyuz, A Universal Spacecraft. Springer Praxis. p. 193. ISBN 1-85233-657-9. 
  10. ^ ReVelle, D. O.; Edwards, W. N. (2007). "Stardust—An artificial, low-velocity "meteor" fall and recovery: 15 January 2006" (PDF). The Meteoritical Society. 
  11. ^ Sprint
  12. ^ a b tomshardware.co.uk - Hard Drive Shock Tolerance - Hard-Disks - Storage, Physics, by O'hanian, 1989, 2007-01-03
  13. ^ “Several Indy car drivers have withstood impacts in excess of 100 G without serious injuries.” Dennis F. Shanahan, M.D., M.P.H.: ”Human Tolerance and Crash Survivability, citing Society of Automotive Engineers. Indy racecar crash analysis. Automotive Engineering International, June 1999, 87–90. And National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: Recording Automotive Crash Event Data
  14. ^ http://www.holloman.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet_print.asp?fsID=6130&page=1
  15. ^ wdc.com - Legacy Product Specifications : WD600BB, read 2012-01-11
  16. ^ "Formula 1 - Bianchi crash impact was 254g". uk.eurosport.yahoo.com. 23 July 2015. Archived from the original on 23 July 2015. 
  17. ^ "The jump of the click beetle (Coleoptera, Elateridae)—a preliminary study - Evans - 2009 - Journal of Zoology". Retrieved 22 April 2015. 
  18. ^ http://www.its.caltech.edu/~biomech/papers/BennetClarkLucey1967.pdf
  19. ^ S-H Yoon; S Park (17 January 2011). "A mechanical analysis of woodpecker drumming and its application to shock-absorbing systems" (PDF). Bioinspiration & Biomimetics. 6 (1): 12. Retrieved 10 January 2016. 
  20. ^ Omega [2], Ball Watch Technology
  21. ^ Cosworth V8 engine ; Up to 10,000 g before rev limits
  22. ^ S. N. Patek, W. L. Korff & R. L. Caldwell (2004). "Deadly strike mechanism of a mantis shrimp" (PDF). Nature. 428 (6985): 819–820. Bibcode:2004Natur.428..819P. doi:10.1038/428819a. PMID 15103366. 
  23. ^ "L-3 Communication's IEC Awarded Contract with Raytheon for Common Air Launched Navigation System". 
  24. ^ bu.edu - Rockets in Horse Poop, 2010-12-10
  25. ^ Assuming an 8.04 gram bullet, a muzzle velocity of 350 metres per second (1,100 ft/s), and a 102 mm barrel.
  26. ^ Patek SN, Baio JE, Fisher BL, Suarez AV (22 August 2006). "Multifunctionality and mechanical origins: Ballistic jaw propulsion in trap-jaw ants" (PDF). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 103 (34): 12787–12792. doi:10.1073/pnas.0604290103. PMC 1568925Freely accessible. PMID 16924120. Retrieved 7 June 2008. 
  27. ^ Assuming an 8.04 gram bullet, a peak pressure of 240 MPa (35,000 psi) and 440 N of friction.
  28. ^ Holberg, J. B.; Barstow, M. A.; Bruhweiler, F. C.; Cruise, A. M.; Penny, A. J. (1998). "Sirius B: A New, More Accurate View". The Astrophysical Journal. 497 (2): 935–942. Bibcode:1998ApJ...497..935H. doi:10.1086/305489. 
  29. ^ Berkeley Physics Course, vol. 1, Mechanics, fig. 4.1 (authors Kittel-Knight-Ruderman, 1973 edition)
  30. ^ "Immunological and Toxinological Responses to Jellyfish Stings". PMC 3773479Freely accessible. 
  31. ^ Calculated from their speed and radius, approximating the LHC as a circle.
  32. ^ https://arxiv.org/abs/1002.1976
  33. ^ "Wolfram|Alpha: Computational Knowledge Engine". www.wolframalpha.com. Retrieved 2016-07-25.