Paul Seymour (basketball)

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Paul Seymour
Personal information
Born(1928-01-30)January 30, 1928
Toledo, Ohio
DiedMay 5, 1998(1998-05-05) (aged 70)
Jensen Beach, Florida
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Listed weight180 lb (82 kg)
Career information
High schoolWoodward
(Toledo, Ohio)
CollegeToledo (1945–1946)
Playing career1946–1960
PositionPoint guard / Shooting guard
Number24, 25, 8, 5
Career history
As player:
1946–1947Toledo Jeeps
1947–1948Baltimore Bullets
1948–1960Syracuse Nationals
As coach:
19561960Syracuse Nationals
19601962St. Louis Hawks
1965–1966Baltimore Bullets
1968–1969Detroit Pistons
Career highlights and awards
As player:

As coach:

Career NBA statistics
Points5,836
Rebounds1,694
Assists2,341
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Paul Norman Seymour (January 30, 1928 – May 5, 1998) was an American professional basketball player and coach.

Playing career[edit]

A 6'1" guard, Seymour played collegiately at the University of Toledo, and had a 12-year career in the NBA and its predecessor, the Basketball Association of America (BAA). He played his first season for the Baltimore Bullets of the BAA; the remainder of his career was with the Syracuse Nationals.

Seymour was named to the All-NBA second team in the 1954–55 and 1954–55 seasons and played in three NBA All-Star Games during his career. He won a championship with the Nationals in the 1954–55 season. For a good part of his career, Seymour was a player-coach for the Nats.

Seymour still shares, with former teammate Red Rocha, the NBA record for most minutes in a playoff game with 67.[1]

Coaching career[edit]

After finishing his playing career, Seymour continued a successful coaching career in the NBA, coaching three teams. Altogether he coached four teams in eight seasons. In 1961, he was the head coach of the Western Division Team in the All Star Game.

Seymour was mentioned in the ESPN documentary, Black Magic, which told the story of African-Americans and basketball. In a segment about Cleo Hill, it was revealed that during the 1961–62 season, Bob Pettit and Cliff Hagan approached management and complained that Hill was taking too many shots. (Allegedly, this was just a cover-up for their desire to not play with an African-American teammate.) Management granted their wish, telling Seymour to severely diminish Hill's offensive role. Seymour refused and was fired 14 games into the season.

While coaching at Baltimore during the 1965–1966 season, Seymour deliberately ended Johnny Kerr's then-record consecutive-games-played streak of 844 games by benching the team captain for one game. According to Kerr, only after the game did Seymour tell Kerr about his intention to end Kerr's streak, saying, "This will take the pressure off you." [2]

Later years[edit]

Seymour was featured in the book, Basketball History in Syracuse, Hoops Roots by author Mark Allen Baker published by The History Press in 2010. The book is an introduction to professional basketball in Syracuse and includes teams like (Vic Hanson's) All-Americans, the Syracuse Reds and the Syracuse Nationals (1946–1963).

Seymour was elected to the first class of the Greater Syracuse Sports Hall of Fame in 1987 along with owner Dan Biasone and NBA all time great Dolph Schayes.[3]

BAA/NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field-goal percentage  FT%  Free-throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game
 PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high
Denotes season in which Seymour won an NBA championship

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG
1947–48 Baltimore 22 .267 .595 .3 3.5
1949–50 Syracuse 62 .334 .716 3.0 7.7
1950–51 Syracuse 51 .325 .736 3.8 3.7 7.2
1951–52 Syracuse 66 33.5 .335 .759 3.4 3.3 9.1
1952–53 Syracuse 67 40.1 .383 .817 3.7 4.4 14.2
1953–54 Syracuse 71 38.4 .377 .813 4.1 5.1 13.1
1954–55 Syracuse 72 41.0 .362 .811 4.3 6.7 14.6
1955–56 Syracuse 57 32.0 .339 .807 2.7 4.8 11.3
1956–57 Syracuse 65 19.0 .324 .821 2.0 3.0 6.0
1957–58 Syracuse 64 11.9 .340 .841 1.7 1.5 4.2
1958–59 Syracuse 21 12.7 .327 .897 1.9 1.7 4.3
1959–60 Syracuse 4 1.8 .000 .000 .3 .0 .0
Career 622 30.1 .350 .792 3.1 3.8 9.4
All-Star 3 16.2 .412 .875 2.3 2.0 7.0

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG
1950 Syracuse 11 .290 .857 3.1 7.1
1951 Syracuse 7 .208 .667 3.7 3.6 4.9
1952 Syracuse 7 38.6 .417 .814 3.7 3.6 12.1
1953 Syracuse 2 56.0 .375 .947 5.0 4.0 18.0
1954 Syracuse 13 43.0 .413 .809 2.6 4.6 14.9
1955 Syracuse 11 37.3 .309 .900 3.9 6.8 12.5
1956 Syracuse 7 21.9 .291 .750 1.6 2.6 6.7
1957 Syracuse 5 19.6 .216 .833 2.0 1.6 4.2
1958 Syracuse 3 16.7 .348 .667 1.3 1.3 6.0
Career 66 34.4 .329 .824 3.0 3.9 9.8

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A March Marathon – Flashback: 1953's Four-OT Thriller – Boston Celtics vs. Syracuse Nationals", Basketball Digest, March 2003, archived from the original on 2006-03-30, retrieved 2008-05-28
  2. ^ "Commentary: Boss ends amazing streak", CNN, June 14, 2009
  3. ^ "Greater Syracuse Sports Hall of Fame". Retrieved 2018-11-04.

External links[edit]