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Peerage of England

The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. In that year, the Peerages of England and Scotland were replaced by one Peerage of Great Britain. English Peeresses obtained their first seats in the House of Lords under the Peerage Act 1963 from which date until the passage of the House of Lords Act 1999 all Peers of England could sit in the House of Lords; the ranks of the English peerage are, in descending order, Marquess, Earl and Baron. While most newer English peerages descend only in the male line, many of the older ones can descend through females; such peerages follow the old English inheritance law of moieties so all daughters stand as co-heirs, so some such titles are in such a state of abeyance between these. Baronets, while holders of hereditary titles, as such are not peers and not entitled to stand for internal delegation, election, in the House of Lords. Knights and holders of other non-hereditary orders and medals are not peers.

In the following table, each peer is listed only by his or her highest English title showing higher or equal titles in the other peerages. Those peers who are known by a higher title in one of the other peerages are listed in italics. Subsidiary title. Subsidiary title. Subsidiary title

Kashless.org

Kashless.org was a Seattle, Washington-based web marketplace where everything was free. Kashless provided a platform to find and redistribute any used or unwanted items, with the goal of reducing users' carbon footprint by consuming less. Another goal was to reduce the amount of matter going to landfills. Launched in the Puget Sound area of Washington in February 2009, Kashless was offered to many local communities in over 40 states and territories of the United States. Kashless.org was founded in October 2008 by ex-Microsoft IT expert Martin Tobias. Developed by Kashless, Inc. Kashless.org was a non-profit demonstration of their software to enable reuse marketplaces. Kashless not only gave its users the ability to get rid of or receive any free and unwanted items – it awarded them with points for doing so. Kashless.org partnered with rewards company RecycleBank in this effort, allocating points to users for both posted and wanted items, along with other point accumulation options. Reward points could be redeemed through partner RecycleBank’s Web site.

Kashless suspended its RecycleBank's points program in early 2010. As of early 2011 it shut down because of lack of funding, referring visitors to Craigslist and freecycle.org. RecycleBank Give It Away Now: Kashless.org to Expand Nationwide Kashless.org Debuts Free Private Label'ReCommerce' Service for Businesses, Community Groups and Charitable Organizations Recycle Bank: Tons of New Points Via Kashless Thumbs Up to Kashless and RecycleBank

Poca, West Virginia

Poca is a town in Putnam County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 974 at the 2010 census. Poca is a part of WV-KY-OH, Metropolitan Statistical Area; as of the 2010 census, the MSA had a population of 287,702. New definitions from February 28, 2013 placed the population at 363,000; the town derives its name from the Pocatalico River. Poca is located at 38°27′41″N 81°48′56″W, it is sited at the confluence of the Pocatalico River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.76 square miles, of which, 0.59 square miles is land and 0.17 square miles is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 974 people, 395 households, 290 families living in the town; the population density was 1,650.8 inhabitants per square mile. There were 415 housing units at an average density of 703.4 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 98.7% White, 0.5% African American, 0.2% Asian, 0.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.6% of the population.

There were 395 households of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.2% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.1% had a male householder with no wife present, 26.6% were non-families. 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.86. The median age in the town was 42.9 years. 21.6% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the town was 51.5 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,013 people, 404 households, 311 families living in the town; the population density was 1,806.2 inhabitants per square mile. There were 430 housing units at an average density of 766.7 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 97.24% White, 1.09% African American, 0.49% Native American, 1.18% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.49% of the population.

There were 404 households out of which 34.4% had children that were under the age of 18 living with them, 61.9% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 23.0% were non-families. 21.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.2% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 2.86. In the town, the population was spread out with 23.5% under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 27.2% from 45 to 64, 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.0 males. The median income for a household in the town was $42,273, the median income for a family was $49,500. Males had a median income of $39,306 versus $20,536 for females; the per capita income for the town was $19,108. About 9.2% of families and 12.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.1% of those under age 18 and 2.5% of those age 65 or over.

The town's high school is somewhat famous for having the mascot "Dots," Poca Dots. Poca High School was selected by ESPN as having the number one sports nickname in the country, Poca Dots. Poca High School's show choir, "Visual Volume," is a 14-time WVMEA state. Director Joseph Kincaid, renowned for his title as "Best Dressed Director" in WVMEA competitive show choir, is a National Board certified teacher; as of 2018, Leonard Varner is the director. Poca is memorialized in a series of art stamps and related stories created by West Virginian artist, Ben Mahmoud; the series of stamps feature humorous fictional stories sensationalized around bits and pieces of actual history