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Peerage of the United Kingdom

The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Acts of Union in 1801, when it replaced the Peerage of Great Britain. New peers continued to be created in the Peerage of Ireland until 1898; the House of Lords Act 1999 reformed the House of Lords. Until all peers of the United Kingdom were automatically members of the House of Lords. However, from that date, most of the hereditary peers ceased to be members, whereas the life peers retained their seats. All hereditary peers of the first creation, all surviving hereditary peers who had served as Leader of the House of Lords, were offered a life peerage to allow them to sit in the House should they wish; some holders of the Peerage of United Kingdom was created for peers in the Peerage of Scotland and Peerage of Ireland as they did not have an automatic seat in the House of Lords until the Peerage Act 1963 which gave Scottish Peers an automatic right to sit in the Lords.

The ranks of the peerage are Duke, Earl and Baron. The last non-royal dukedom was created in 1900, the last marquessate was created in 1936. Creation of the remaining ranks, except baronies for life ceased once Harold Wilson's Labour government took office in 1964, only eight people have been created hereditary peers since then; these were: Subsidiary title. Imperial peerage created for the Peer of Scotland and Ireland to have an automatic seat in the House of Lords until 1963 for Scotland and 1999 for Ireland. Subsidiary title. Imperial peerage created for the Peer of Scotland and Ireland to have an automatic seat in the House of Lords until 1963 for Scotland and 1999 for Ireland. Subsidiary title. Imperial peerage created for the Peer of Scotland and Ireland to have an automatic seat in the House of Lords until 1963 for Scotland and 1999 for Ireland. Subsidiary title. Imperial peerage created for the Peer of Scotland and Ireland to have an automatic seat in the House of Lords until 1963 for Scotland and 1999 for Ireland.

Subsidiary title. Imperial peerage created for the Peer of Scotland and Ireland to have an automatic seat in the House of Lords until 1963 for Scotland and 1999 for Ireland. Duke of York Duke of Westminster Marquess of Abergavenny Earl Russell Earl Haig Earl Attlee Earl of Woolton Viscount Davidson Viscount Gough Viscount Long Viscount Craigavon Viscount Simon Viscount Margesson Viscount Montgomery of Alamein Viscount Norwich Viscount Mills Baron Stratheden and Campbell Baron Northbrook Baron Lawrence Baron Harlech Baron Burnham Baron de Villiers Baron Cullen of Ashbourne Baron Glendyne Baron Banbury of Southam Baron Rennell Baron May Baron Greenhill Baron Milner of Leeds Baron Sinclair of Cleeve Baron Birkett Baron Robertson of Oakridge Baron Sherfield Baron Glendevon Earl of Clancarty Marquesses, earls and barons are all addressed as'Lord X', where'X' represents either their territory or surname pertaining to their title. Marchionesses, countesses and baronesses are all addressed as'Lady X'.

Dukes and duchesses are addressed just as'Duke' or'Duchess' or, in a non-social context,'Your Grace'. 31 Dukes: see List of dukes in the peerages of Britain and Ireland 34 Marquesses: see List of marquesses in the peerages of Britain and Ireland 193 Earls and countesses: see List of earls in the peerages of Britain and Ireland 112 Viscounts: see List of viscounts in the peerages of Britain and Ireland 1,187 Barons: see List of barons in the peerages of Britain and Ireland Women: see List of peerages created for women and List of peerages inherited by women British nobility Dukes in the United Kingdom History of the British peerage Marquesses in the United Kingdom Peerage of England Peerage of Great Britain Peerage of Ireland Peerage of Scotland Peerages in the United Kingdom The Roll of the Peerage, The Crown Office, Ministry of Justice

Willem Tomlinson

Willem David Daniel Tomlinson is an English professional footballer who plays as a central midfielder for Mansfield Town. Tomlinson began in the youth ranks of EFL Championship side Blackburn Rovers from 2009, he was unused substitute on three occasions in the Championship, prior to making his first-team debut on 19 February 2017 in an FA Cup fifth-round tie against Manchester United. His league debut came a week versus Derby County. On 3 November 2017, Tomlinson signed a new contract with Blackburn. However, he terminated his contract just over a year in January 2019. Prior to leaving Blackburn Rovers, Tomlinson trained with Exeter City. However, on 4 February 2019, Tomlinson signed a contract with fellow EFL League Two club Mansfield Town; as of 14 September 2019 Willem Tomlinson at Soccerway

640

Year 640 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 640 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. February 27 – Pepin the Elder, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia, dies and is succeeded by his son Grimoald, he becomes the head of the Frankish household, the most powerful man in the Frankish Kingdom. King Chintila dies of natural causes after a 3-year reign, in which he permitted the bishops wide authority in Hispania and Galicia, he is succeeded by his son Tulga. At the request of Porga of Croatia, one of the first dukes or princes of Dalmatian Croatia, the Byzantine emperor Heraclius sends Christian missionaries to the Croatian Provinces; the French city of Lille is founded by Lydéric. He kills Phinaert in a duel to avenges his parents' deaths. King Eadbald of Kent dies after a 24-year reign, he is succeeded by his sons and Eormenred, who jointly rule the Kingdom of Kent.

Hartlepool Abbey in Northumbria is founded. Wooden huts surrounding a church are built in Saxon style. May – Siege of Babylon Fortress: The Rashidun army lays siege to Babylon Fortress in the Nile Delta; the next two months' fighting remain inconclusive, the Byzantines having the upper hand by repulsing every Muslim assault. July 6 – Battle of Heliopolis: The Muslim Arab army under'Amr ibn al-'As defeats the Byzantine forces near Heliopolis. Amr divides his troops into three parts. December 21 – Muslim Arabs capture Babylon after a seven-month siege; the Thebaid region is annexed by the Rashidun Caliphate. December 22 – On orders of the Saracen leader, the Serapeum of Alexandria, containing works that had survived the destruction of the Library of Alexandria, is burned down, along with its collection of 500,000 manuscripts; this story may be apocryphal. Emperor Taizong of Tang begins the military campaigns against the Western Regions states in the Tarim Basin. General Hou Junji captures the kingdom of Gaochang.

Nestorian missionaries build the Daqin Pagoda in Chang'an. Daqin is the name for the Near East. Disibod, Irish monk and hermit, arrives as a missionary in Francia, he begins his religious work in the Ardennes. May 28 – Pope Severinus succeeds Honorius I as the 71st pope, he dies in Rome only two months after being consecrated. December 24 – Pope John IV succeeds Severinus as the 72nd pope, his election is accepted by the Exarchate of Ravenna. Al-Akhtal, Arab poet Arikesari Maravarman, king of the Pandyan Empire Asparukh, ruler of the Bulgarian Empire Godeberta, Frankish abbess Isonokami no Maro, Japanese statesman Kilian, Irish bishop Luo Binwang, Chinese poet Musa ibn Nusayr, Arab general Winnoc, Welsh abbot Wulfhere, king of Mercia Wulfram, archbishop of Sens February 27 – Pepin the Elder, Mayor of the Palace August 2 – Pope Severinus September 12 – Sak K'uk', queen of Palenque Alena, Frankish martyr Arnulf of Metz, Frankish bishop and saint Bilal ibn Rabah al-Habashi, companion of Muhammed Chintila, king of the Visigoths Dushun, Chinese patriarch Eadbald, king of Kent Eanswith, Anglo-Saxon princess Li Xiaogong, prince of the Tang Dynasty Romanus, bishop of Rouen Tysilio, Welsh prince and bishop Yazid ibn Abi Sufyan, Arab general