Phenazone

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Phenazone
Phenazone2DCSD.svg
Clinical data
Synonyms analgesine, antipyrine
ATC code
Pharmacokinetic data
Elimination half-life 12 hours
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.442 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
Formula C11H12N2O
Molar mass 188.2258g/mol
3D model (JSmol)
  (verify)

Phenazone (INN and BAN; also known as phenazon, antipyrine (USAN), or analgesine) is an analgesic, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and an antipyretic. It was first synthesized by Ludwig Knorr in 1887.[1][2]:26–27 Phenazone is synthesized[3] by condensation of phenylhydrazine and ethyl acetoacetate under basic conditions and methylation of the resulting intermediate compound 1-phenyl-3-methylpyrazolone[4] with dimethyl sulfate or methyl iodide. It crystallizes in needles which melt at 156 °C. Potassium permanganate oxidizes it to pyridazine tetracarboxylic acid. Phenazone has an elimination half life of about 12 hours.[5] Indication: Used to relieve pain and fever. Antipyrine is often used in testing the effects of other drugs or diseases on drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver.[6]

Adverse effects[edit]

Possible adverse effects include:[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brune, K (1997). "The early history of non-opioid analgesics". Acute Pain. 1: 33. doi:10.1016/S1366-0071(97)80033-2.
  2. ^ Enrique Ravina. The Evolution of Drug Discovery: From Traditional Medicines to Modern Drugs. John Wiley & Sons, 2011 ISBN 9783527326693
  3. ^ https://books.google.ca/books?id=07g30rxCA0EC&lpg=PA225&ots=KjJPobMfjq&dq=synthesis%20of%20phenazone&pg=PA226#v=onepage&q=synthesis%20of%20phenazone&f=false
  4. ^ http://www.chemspider.com/Chemical-Structure.63516.html
  5. ^ http://www.mims.com/USA/drug/info/phenazone/?q=Other%20Ear%20Preparations&type=full
  6. ^ http://www.medicatione.com/?c=ing&s=antipyrine

External links[edit]