Pingyuan Province

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former province of the People's Republic of China
平原省
Pingyuan Province

(1949-1952)
PRC-Pingyuan.png
Capital Xinxiang

Pingyuan (Chinese: 平原; pinyin: Píngyuán) was a former province of the People's Republic of China that existed between 1949 and 1952. Its capital was Xinxiang, now in Henan province.

History[edit]

Pingyuan Province was established on August 20, 1949, comprising adjoining prefectures in the provinces of Henan and Shandong:

  • Xinxiang, Henan (along with then-separate urban centre Xinxiang City)
  • Puyang, Henan
  • Anyang, Henan (along with then-separate urban centre Anyang City)
  • Heze, Shandong
  • Huxi, Shandong
  • Liaocheng, Shandong

Pan Fusheng was the first Communist Party Chief of the province,[1] and Chao Zhefu was its only governor.[2] In March 1950, a number of peasants and cattle froze to death when transporting grain to government storage in Puyang prefecture. Pan took partial responsibility for the "Puyang Incident" and was demoted to deputy party chief,[1] he was replaced by Wu De.[3]

The province was abolished on November 15, 1952, its component territories were returned to their original provinces - with the exception of Anyang's Wu'an, Shexian and Linzhang counties, which were transferred to Handan prefecture in Hebei.

Administrative divisions[edit]

Name Administrative Seat Simplified Chinese Hanyu Pinyin Subdivisions
Xinxiang Xinxiang 新乡市 Xīnxiāng Shì none
Anyang Anyang 安阳市 Ānyáng Shì none
Heze Division Heze County 菏泽专区 Hézé Zhuānqū 8 counties
Huxi Division Dianxian 湖西专区 Húxī Zhuānqū 2 counties
Liaocheng Division Liaocheng County 聊城专区 Liáochéng Zhuānqū 11 counties
Puyang Division Puyang County 濮阳专区 Púyáng Zhuānqū 7 counties
Anyang Division Anyang County 安阳专区 Ānyáng Zhuānqū 6 counties
Xinxiang Division Xinxiang County 新乡专区 Xīnxiāng Zhuānqū 13 counties

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 潘复生 [Pan Fusheng] (in Chinese). Xinhua. Retrieved 15 October 2014. 
  2. ^ Yang Dezhi. "Chao Zhefu" (in Chinese). People's Daily. Retrieved 15 October 2014. 
  3. ^ "Wu De" (in Chinese). People's Daily. Retrieved 15 October 2014.