Portal:Ancient Near East

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

 
The Ancient Near East Portal

Selected article

Code of Hammurabi
Babylonian law is well documented from the earliest writings through the Hellenistic period — so-called "contracts" exist in the thousands, including deeds, conveyances, bonds, receipts, accounts, and most significantly, actual legal decisions given by judges in the law courts.

Other cultures involved with ancient Mesopotamia shared the same common laws and precedents, extending to the form of contacts in the Bible, down to the sequence of blessings and curses that bind the deal.

The discovery of the Code of Hammurabi has allowed for a more systematic study than could have been possible from just the classification and interpretation of other material. Even in ancient times, the Code was studied, divided into chapters, entitled Ninu ilu sirum from its incipit, and recopied for fifteen hundred years, the greater part of it remained in force, even through the Persian, Greek and Parthian conquests, which had little effect on private life in Babylonia; and it survived to influence Syro-Roman and later Islamic law. The law of Assyria was derived from the Babylonian, but conserved early features long after they had disappeared elsewhere.

Read more...

ArchiveSuggest

Selected biography

Ashurbanipal (Akkadian, Aššur-bāni-apli, "Ashur created a son", reigned 669 – c. 631 BC) was the last great king of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. He established the first systematically organized library, known as the Library of Ashurbanipal.

Read more...

ArchiveSuggest

Selected picture

Offering Bearer
Credit: Jastrow
Offering Bearer
Sargon II's palace, Dur-Sharrukin, Assyria, 721-705 BC (Louvre)

Read more...

ArchiveSuggest

Did you know...

Nabonidus Cylinder
...that the Hurrian language and the Urartian language are proposed to be distantly related to the modern Armenian language?

...that the Aramaic language, the lingua franca of the ancient Near East in Biblical times is still spoken as a first language today?

...that the syllabic cuneiform script was adapted to create a phonetic alphabet twice, for the Ugaritic language and for the Old Persian language?

ArchiveSuggest
Related Portals

History
portal
    Archaeology
portal
    Ancient Egypt
portal
    Languages
portal
    Military history
portal
    Mythology
portal
Portal:History Portal:Archaeology Portal:Ancient Egypt Portal:Languages Portal:Military history Portal:Mythology


Bible
portal
    Judaism
portal
    Zoroastrianism
portal

Portal:Bible

Portal:Judaism

Portal:Zoroastrianism


Portal:Literature Portal:Political science Portal:Law Portal:Visual arts Portal:Architecture Portal:Mathematics Portal:Astronomy Portal:Medicine
Literature
portal
    Political science
portal
    Law
portal
    Visual arts
portal
    Architecture
portal
    Mathematics
portal
    Astronomy
portal
    Medicine
portal

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

Wikibooks
Books

Commons
Media

Wikinews 
News

Wikiquote 
Quotations

Wikisource 
Texts

Wikiversity
Learning resources

Wiktionary 
Definitions

Wikidata 
Database

Purge server cache