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Portal:Bulgaria

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Bulgarian: Добре дошли в българския портал!

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Welcome to the Bulgarian portal!

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Къде е България? • Where is Bulgaria?

(Partially recognized Western-Bulgarian autonomy, the Republic of Macedonia is marked in orange)
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Bulgaria (/bʌlˈɡɛəriə, bʊl-/ (About this sound listen); Bulgarian: България, tr. Bǎlgariya), officially the Republic of Bulgaria (Bulgarian: Република България, tr. Republika Bǎlgariya, IPA: [rɛˈpublikɐ bɐɫˈɡarijɐ]), is a country in southeastern Europe. It is bordered by Romania to the north, Serbia and Macedonia to the west, Greece and Turkey to the south, and the Black Sea to the east. With a territory of 110,994 square kilometres (42,855 sq mi), Bulgaria is Europe's 16th-largest country.

Organised prehistoric cultures began developing on current Bulgarian lands during the Neolithic period, its ancient history saw the presence of the Thracians, Ancient Greeks, Persians, Celts, Romans, Goths, Alans and Huns. The emergence of a unified Bulgarian state dates back to the establishment of the First Bulgarian Empire in 681 AD, which dominated most of the Balkans and functioned as a cultural hub for Slavs during the Middle Ages. With the downfall of the Second Bulgarian Empire in 1396, its territories came under Ottoman rule for nearly five centuries, the Russo-Turkish War of 1877–78 led to the formation of the Third Bulgarian State. The following years saw several conflicts with its neighbours, which prompted Bulgaria to align with Germany in both world wars; in 1946 it became a one-party socialist state as part of the Soviet-led Eastern Bloc. In December 1989 the ruling Communist Party allowed multi-party elections, which subsequently led to Bulgaria's transition into a democracy and a market-based economy.

Bulgaria's population of 7.2 million people is predominantly urbanised and mainly concentrated in the administrative centres of its 28 provinces. Most commercial and cultural activities are centred on the capital and largest city, Sofia, the strongest sectors of the economy are heavy industry, power engineering, and agriculture, all of which rely on local natural resources.

The country's current political structure dates to the adoption of a democratic constitution in 1991. Bulgaria is a unitary parliamentary republic with a high degree of political, administrative, and economic centralisation, it is a member of the European Union, NATO, and the Council of Europe; a founding state of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE); and has taken a seat at the UN Security Council three times.

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The pier at Shkorpilovtsi.
Credit: Evgeni Dinev

Shkorpilovtsi is a resort town on the Bulgarian Black Sea Coast. Black Sea Coast beaches occupy approximately 130 km of the 378 km coast, the region is an important centre for tourism during the summer, drawing foreign and Bulgarian tourists alike.

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The map of Bulgaria.

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Bogomil shrine in Travnik, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Bogomilism (Bulgarian: Богомилство) is the Gnostic dualistic sect, the synthesis of Armenian Paulicianism and the Bulgarian Slavonic Church reform movement, which emerged in Bulgaria between 927 and 970 and spread into Byzantine Empire, Serbia, Bosnia, Italy and France.

The now defunct Gnostic social-religious movement and doctrine originated in the time of Peter I of Bulgaria (927–969) as a reaction against state and clerical oppression; in spite of all measures of repression, it remained strong and popular until the fall of Bulgaria in the end of the 14th century.

Bogomilism is the first significant Bulgarian "heresy" that came about in the first quarter of the 10th century in the area of today’s Plovdiv (Philippopolis), it was a natural outcome of many factors that had arisen till the beginning of 10th century. The forced Christianization of the Slavs and proto-Bulgarians by khan Boris I in 863 and the fact that the religion was practiced in Greek, which only the ‘elite’ knew, resulted in a very superficial level of understanding of the religion, if any understanding at all. Another very important factor was the social discontent of the peasantry.

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Nuvola apps kate.png Requested articlesBirth rate in Bulgaria (bg) • Census of Bulgaria, 1992 (bg) • Census of Bulgaria, 2001 (bg) • Census of Bulgaria, 2011 (bg) • Bulgarian architecture (bg) • Bulgarian gardenersTotyu Mladenov (bg) • Alexander Tsvetkov (bg) • Nona Karadzhova (bg) • Stefan Konstantinov (bg) • Minko Gerdzhikov (bg) • Nikolay Liliev (bg) • Teodor Trayanov (bg) • Bulgarian dressPliska–Preslav culture (bg) • Evgeni Tanchev (bg) • Plamen Paskov (bg)

Nuvola kdict glass.png ExpandDulo clanYantra RiverNestinarstvoVrana PalacePliskaGate of TrajanGeorgi IvanovGeorgi BenkovskiEkaterina DafovskaName days in BulgariaEvlogi GeorgievSlivenShumenShishman dynasty


Nuvola apps kappfinder.png Requested imagesKlokotnitsaNaftex StadiumPalitsiVrana PalaceDimitar Petkov

Nuvola apps filetypes.svg Further informationWikiProject BulgariaBulgarian Collaboration ProjectTranslation into English/Bulgarian

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Did You Know?

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  • ... that the early 17th-century church in the village of Dobarsko features frescoes of Jesus taking off in a rocket?