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The Chicago Portal

Chicago's population of approximately 3 million people and its metropolitan area of over 9 million people make it the third-most populous city and metropolitan area in the United States. Adjacent to Lake Michigan, it is the largest Great Lakes city and among the world's 25 largest urban areas by population. Incorporated as a city in 1837 after being founded in 1833 at the site of a portage, it became a transportation hub in North America and the financial capital of the Midwest, since the World's Fair of 1893, it has been regarded as one of the ten most influential cities in the world. For example, diverse events such as Chicago Pile-1, the first man made nuclear reactor, and Chicago school architecture have changed human history, and the way urban spaces are organized. Chicago boasts some of the world's tallest buildings (Willis Tower, and Trump International Hotel and Tower). The University of Chicago is a leader in many fields and has contributed to academic thought, such as the Chicago school of economics or Chicago school of sociology.

Today, Chicago has diverse cultural offerings: teams from each of the major league sports (Bears, Blackhawks, Bulls, Cubs, and White Sox), a financial district anchored by the Chicago Mercantile Exchange on LaSalle Street in the Chicago Board of Trade Building, and an arts culture anchored by the Art Institute of Chicago and Millennium Park as well as Chicago Landmarks such as Wrigley Field. The Magnificent Mile is a fitting tribute for a city that has revolutionized retail merchandising with mail order catalogs, the money-back guarantee, bridal registry and using posted prices on goods.

Chicago hosts O'Hare (the world's second busiest) and Midway International Airports as well as the renowned 'L' rapid transit system. Chicago was once the capital of the railroad industry and the nation's meatpacking had its hub at the Union Stock Yards. Chicago has seen the influence of Al Capone. Recent members of the Cook County Democratic Party from Chicago include Chicago Mayors Richard J. Daley and his son Richard M. Daley, Chicago's first African-American Mayor, Harold Washington, the first African-American female United States Senator, Carol Moseley Braun, and the first African-American United States President, former Senator Barack Obama.

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Selected article

The Great Ziegfeld poster
The Great Ziegfeld is a 1936 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) musical film directed by Robert Z. Leonard and produced by Hunt Stromberg. It stars William Powell, Luise Rainer, and Myrna Loy, the film, shot at MGM Studios in Culver City, California in the fall of 1935, is a fictionalized tribute to Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr. and a cinematic adaption of Broadway's Ziegfeld Follies, with highly elaborate costumes, dances and sets. Many of the performers of the theatrical Ziegfeld Follies were cast in the film as themselves, including Fanny Brice and Harriet Hoctor, and Billie Burke acted as a supervisor for the film. The "A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody" set alone was reported to have cost US$220,000 (US$3,879,808 in 2018 dollars[1]),[2], the music to the film was provided by Walter Donaldson, Irving Berlin, and Harold Adamson. The extravagant costumes were designed by Adrian, taking some 250 tailors and seamstresses six months to prepare them. One of the biggest successes in film in the 1930s and the pride of MGM at the time, it was acclaimed as the greatest musical biography to be made in Hollywood and still remains a standard in musical film making, it won three Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actress. Although the film is still praised for its lavish production and as a symbol of glamor and excess during the Golden Age of Hollywood, today Ziegfeld is generally seen less favorably and is considered to be excessively showy and long. MGM made two sequels: Ziegfeld Girl and Ziegfeld Follies.

Anna Held

Selected picture

Carrie Eliza Getty Tomb
Credit: Mindfrieze

The Carrie Eliza Getty Tomb, located in Graceland Cemetery in Chicago, Illinois, was commissioned in 1890 by the lumber magnate, Henry Harrison Getty, for his wife, Carrie Eliza. It was designed by the noted American architect, Louis Sullivan of the firm Adler & Sullivan.

Selected list

Deng shot 121407.jpg

The Chicago Bulls are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Chicago, Illinois. Dick Klein founded the Bulls in 1966 after six other professional basketball teams in Chicago had failed. In 42 Chicago Bulls seasons, the Bulls have achieved a winning record 20 times, and have appeared in the NBA playoffs 27 times, they received international recognition in the 1990s when All-Star shooting guard Michael Jordan led them to their six league championships. The only NBA franchises that have won more championships than the Bulls are the Boston Celtics (17 championships) and Los Angeles Lakers (14), the Bulls initially competed in the NBA's Western Division. The Western Division was renamed the Western Conference in 1970, and was split into the Midwest and Pacific Divisions. The Bulls played in the Midwest Division until 1980, when they moved to the Central Division of the Eastern Conference. (Read more...)



Selected biography

Norman Finkelstein
Norman Gary Finkelstein is an American political scientist and author, specialising in Jewish-related issues, especially the Holocaust and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. A graduate of SUNY Binghamton, he received his Ph.D in Political Science from Princeton University. He has held faculty positions at Brooklyn College, Rutgers University, Hunter College, New York University, and most recently, DePaul University, where he was an assistant professor from 2001 to 2007. Finkelstein's career has been marked by controversy, his writings, noted for their support of the Palestinian cause have dealt with politically-charged topics such as Zionism. Amidst considerable public debate, Finkelstein was denied tenure at DePaul in June 2007, and placed on administrative leave for the 2007-2008 academic year, among the controversial aspects of this decision were attempts by Alan Dershowitz, a notable opponent of Finkelstein's, to derail Finkelstein's tenure bid. On September 5, 2007 Finkelstein announced his resignation after coming to a settlement with the university on generally undisclosed terms.


Nelson Algren
"Once you've come to be a part of this particular patch, you'll never love another. Like loving a woman with a broken nose, you may well find lovelier lovelies, but never a lovely so real." — Nelson Algren

Selected landmark

Heller House
The Isidore H. Heller House is a house located at 5132 Woodlawn Avenue in the Hyde Park community area of Chicago in Cook County, Illinois, USA. The house was designed by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, the design is credited as one of the turning points in Wright's shift to geometric, Prairie School architecture, which is defined by horizontal lines, flat or hipped roofs with broad overhanging eaves, windows grouped in horizontal bands, and an integration with the landscape, which is meant to evoke native Prairie surroundings. The work demonstrates Wright's shift away from emulating the style of his mentor, Louis Sullivan. Richard Bock, a Wright collaborator and sculptor, provided some of the ornamentation, including a plaster frieze. The ownership history of this building demonstrates the property's evolution and development in the framework of surrounding Hyde Park buildings, and the building's location in the current community—near other Prairie School architecture—includes this building into the overall body of Lloyd Wright's work, the Heller House was designated a Chicago Landmark on September 15, 1971, and added to the National Register of Historic Places on March 16, 1972. On 18 August 2004, the U.S. Department of the Interior designated the house a National Historic Landmark.


Did you know?

  • StateStreetc1907.jpg

...that after the 1871 Great Chicago Fire, the Loop Retail Historic District (pictured) was Chicago's premier retailing district until it was replaced by commuter suburbs and the Magnificent Mile?

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  1. ^ Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Community Development Project. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved January 2, 2018. 
  2. ^ Green 1999, p. 54.