Portal:Middle-earth

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Introduction

Middle-earth is the fictional setting of much of British writer J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. The term is equivalent to the term Midgard of Norse mythology, describing the human-inhabited world, that is, the central continent of the Earth in Tolkien's imagined mythological past.

Tolkien's most widely read works, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, take place entirely in Middle-earth, and Middle-earth has also become a short-hand to refer to the legendarium and Tolkien's fictional take on the world.

Selected image

Tolkien The two trees.jpg
Credit: Julia Pelzer

The Two Trees of Valinor in the fictional universe of J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth are Telperion and Laurelin, the Silver Tree and the Gold Tree that brought light to the Land of the Valar in ancient times. They were destroyed by Melkor and Ungoliant the great spider. Morgoth/Melkor stabbed each of the trees with his spear, and Ungoliant drank them dry, but the last flower of Telperion and the last fruit of Laurelin were made by the Valar into the Moon and the Sun.

Selected article

The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy saga by English author J. R. R. Tolkien, his magnum opus and a sequel to his well-received earlier work, The Hobbit. The Lord of the Rings was originally published in three volumes in 1954 and 1955. Three film adaptations have been made of the story told by the books: the first, by animator Ralph Bakshi was released in 1978 (as part one of what was intended to be a two-part adaptation of the story); the second, a 1980 television special; and the third, director Peter Jackson's epic film trilogy, released in three installments in 2001, 2002, and 2003 which starred Elijah Wood as the main character of Frodo.

For more information regarding the fictional universe in which the story takes place, including lists of characters and locations, see Middle-earth (the name Tolkien bestowed upon his world).

The titular character of the Lord of the Rings is the Dark Lord Sauron, ruler of the land of Mordor; the evil power of the work, Sauron created the One Ring to control nineteen other Rings of Power, and was thus the "Lord of the Rings." Sauron, in turn, was the servant of an earlier Dark Lord, Morgoth (Melkor), who is prominent in Tolkien's The Silmarillion, an earlier history of Middle-Earth.

Subcategories

Category puzzle
Middle-earth(17 C, 12 P)
Middle-earth animals(1 C, 17 P)
Middle-earth books(6 C, 26 P)
Middle-earth characters(17 C, 8 P, 2 F)
Middle-earth eras(11 P)
Middle-earth events(2 C, 15 P)
Middle-earth languages(2 C, 32 P)
Middle-earth lists(1 C, 23 P)
Middle-earth locations(11 C, 78 P, 3 F)
Middle-earth objects(2 C, 22 P)
Middle-earth plants(30 P)
Middle-earth poetry(18 P)
Middle-earth races(10 C, 19 P)
Works based on Middle-earth(7 C, 8 P)
Middle-earth stubs(89 P)

Things you can do

Tasks clipboard

Here are some open tasks for WikiProject Middle-earth. Feel free to help with any of the following tasks:

Collaboration: Return Middle-earth to featured status, make Lord of the Rings a good article, review Cirth for good article nomination.
Cleanup: List of Hobbits, List of hobbit families, Second Age
Copyedit/extensive work: Círdan, Meriadoc Brandybuck, Valaquenta
Create: J. R. R. Tolkien: A Descriptive Bibliography, Kay Miner, Tolkien's View: Windows into his world
Expand to separate pages/list entries: Alliterative verse by J. R. R. Tolkien, Art inspired by J. R. R. Tolkien
Stubs: The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, Tolkien Studies
Provide references: The Notion Club Papers
Add secondary sources: Númenor, Moria (Middle-earth)
Current topics (may need updating): The History of The Hobbit, The Hobbit films
Merge into: Minor places in Middle-earth, Minor places in Beleriand
Other: See the Things to do page, update a Random article (reset) , or review recent changes

Interwiki Links

J.R.R. Tolkien     Guide to The Lord of the Rings     Elven writing     Quenya     J.R.R. Tolkien
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